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Old 04-25-2010, 09:30 PM   #11
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My mother-in-law's family was from Slovakia (father-in-law's from Slovenia). Halupke is something I have to make every winter. After almost 30 years of marriage, I have Halupke down pat, but would love any other recipes you care to post. Oh, yes, she also made a mean potica, which I tried a couple of times and now buy from Vermont Country Store, it is just too darned hard!
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Old 04-25-2010, 10:28 PM   #12
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Welcome!

Everyone on both sides of my family were originally from Bohemia, so I am also quite fond of & familiar with much of the cooking - Czech bread dumplings, Bohemian potato dumplings (both with sauerkraut, of course), goulash, Jaternice (liver sausages), Jelita (blood sausages), roast duck & goose (always with caraway seeds), chicken in sour cream dill sauce, Kolache & Buchti pastries (mmmm). . . .

What can I say? It's 100% in my blood - lol!!
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:19 AM   #13
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Thanks for all your nice comments! When it comes to "halupki", I'll add a recipe at some point. But the thing is, halupki are not actually common in Slovakia at all. What???? Ok, let me rephrase that. They are not common in the part of Slovakia where I grew up, smack in the middle. They are mostly an eastern dish, common in the Russyn region which spans the Slovak/Ukrainian border. This part of the country has also historically always been the poorest (I guess due to the distance from the western markets), and as such the majority of Slovak immigrants to the United States came from this area. With them, they brought their own traditions, and meals like halupki - "plnena kapusta", stuffed cabbage. Same goes with pierogi, pasha (never heard of this) and eastern cheese (never heard of this either, found out its an orthodox thing). The only kinds of pierogi that are common throughout Slovakia are pierogi filled with bryndza, and also pierogi filled with jam and topped with fried bread crumbs. Meat filled pierogi are quite uncommon.

But things like bread dumplings, goulash, kolache and buchty, jaternica, now those are the real Slovak and Czech dishes :)
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:25 AM   #14
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Eastern cheese? Did you mean Easter Cheese?
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:28 AM   #15
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Seems the cuisine of Slovakia was heavily influenced by Hungary, Austria, and Poland. Even the names of many towns changed depending on who was in charge.
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Old 04-30-2010, 10:31 AM   #16
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Ooops typo :) Yup, I meant Easter Cheese. Never heard of this until I came to the US and people started asking me about it. I eventually found out it's common in the Orthodox church, but majority of Slovakia is Catholic (or at least follows the Catholic traditions, since many Slovaks are not religious). And totally! Slovak cuisine is a melting pot, mostly of Hungarian and German influences. Goulash, which is like THE Hungarian dish, is also one of the most popular dishes in Slovakia. Of course, we have given it our unique twist, in that we serve it with the bread steamed dumpling. You use the dumpling to soak up the juices in the stew. It's so yummy.
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Old 04-30-2010, 04:31 PM   #17
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Lekvar filled Roshky

How can one reduce or eliminate leakage when baking plum lekvar filled Roshky made from a pliable & thin rolled up yeast dough?
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Old 04-30-2010, 04:34 PM   #18
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Hehe, the same has happened to me! So I asked my grandma to show me how she makes buchty, which is I think what you are referring to. You can go to my site to see how to roll them right: Baked Buns (Pečené Buchty) recipe - Slovak Cooking
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Old 04-30-2010, 04:41 PM   #19
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Thanks. I'll czech it out. Seems to be a cake of a thousand names- orechovnik / biegli / potica
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Old 04-30-2010, 05:03 PM   #20
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Nice interesting website Lubos.
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