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Old 01-20-2014, 12:44 AM   #11
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Probably a leftover term for the yeast when it was first marketed, assuring that it was an "active" form of yeast.
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Old 01-20-2014, 12:50 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Probably a leftover term for the yeast when it was first marketed, assuring that it was an "active" form of yeast.
You know, that's probably it. I can imagine people were quite skeptical of the dry yeast, when they were used to moist cakes of yeast.
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Old 01-20-2014, 01:54 AM   #13
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Umm...Discuss Cooking is that resource...
+1 Well said!
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Old 01-20-2014, 09:46 AM   #14
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Mom used little cubes of yeast wrapped in foil. I use the active dry yeast.
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Old 01-20-2014, 12:12 PM   #15
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This is the explanation from Bread World (maintained by ACH, the parent company of Fleischmann's) and the one I would trust:
"RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are different strains than Active Dry Yeast. RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are grown with a higher level of nutrients and are dried to lower moisture content. The particle size of RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast are finely granulated to allow complete hydration of the yeast cells during the mixing process. The Active Dry Yeast larger particle size should be dissolved in water to achieve complete hydration prior to adding to the mixer. In addition, RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast contain ascorbic acid resulting in increased loaf volumes."
The bottom line is that active dry yeast should always be hydrated in water before use, while RapidRise and Bread Machine Yeast can be mixed straight into the dough.
I find this interesting information. I've been making all our household's bread products for most of my life and have only, except in the early days, used active dry yeast...for every application. Bread machine or not. Plus, I've never hydrated my yeast before using it, with the minor exception if I'm not sure how old my yeast is. That, too, usually isn't a problem because I use it up so quickly.

I buy yeast in one-pound vacuum-sealed packages. When I open one, the yeast goes immediately into a glass jar with a tightly-sealing lid and into the freezer. Annually, I estimate we use about 4 pounds of yeast. But that's a conservative estimate.

I mentioned the "early days," which is when I used the cake yeast, found in the refrigerated section of my markets. Now, it's nearly impossible to find it in my region and when I see it, it's outrageously expensive. About $1.50 per cake. I can buy a LOT of dry yeast for several of those cakes. Plus, I've noticed that the three-section packs of dry yeast are pretty pricey as well.

My brother, who is an awesome cook and baker, swears he can't make any yeast goods using dry yeast. Claims he can't get it to rise. I've walked him through all sorts of steps and he still insists the dry won't work for him. As a result, last Christmas I gave him a half dozen cakes of yeast as a present.

By now, I've memorized the equivalent of a packet of dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons) so I can use my bulk yeast just as easily as a packet or a fraction of a packet if I'm reducing a recipe.
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Old 01-20-2014, 12:33 PM   #16
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Instant yeast that I get at the club store is awesome, I'm working on the second pound, I bought the two pounds about 5 years ago! Instant seems to give the most consistent results. I still often proof the yeast because it is so old. I have great acrylic, air tight container that I use and it is stored in the fridge.

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Old 01-20-2014, 12:58 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
I find this interesting information. I've been making all our household's bread products for most of my life and have only, except in the early days, used active dry yeast...for every application. Bread machine or not. Plus, I've never hydrated my yeast before using it, with the minor exception if I'm not sure how old my yeast is. That, too, usually isn't a problem because I use it up so quickly.
Katie, the original poster asked about the differences. What I posted is from the manufacturer's web site and explains the difference, along with their recommendations.

Can there be exceptions? Of course. Especially if you are an experienced baker, as you apparently are.

I've also been baking bread for a long time. I started because good bread used to be hard to come by. I suspect that's why most of us bake-your-own types started. To this day, I can't eat the stuff you find in the bread aisle at the supermarket. It's only been in the last couple of years, since my daughter went off to college, that I now buy an occasional loaf from the store bakery. Two reasons for the change. First, we no longer seem to go through as much bread without a teenage eating machine in the house. And second, many stores now have their own bakeries and it's much easier to find good quality bread than it used to be. Maybe there's a third reason: I've grown a little less energetic with age.

I think most of us simply use what we're used to. My grandmother swore by cake yeast. She never used anything else. And for more than a dozen years, I used only active dry yeast in the packets and never had any problems.

Since about 2005 I've used primarily RapidRise yeast for homemade bread. I buy a big jar and keep it in the fridge. My go-to recipe only calls for 1/4 tsp. and makes two smaller loaves so the jar lasts quite a while. I just mix it into the dough, add my water, and run it through the food processor for about 30 seconds to "knead" it. Easy peasy.

In the end, pretty much any yeast will get the job done if you know how to use it (even feral yeast, provided you have the patience and a good culture). I even remember one time running out of "bread yeast" and using wine yeast to bake with. Guess what? The bread came out fine.
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Old 01-20-2014, 01:26 PM   #18
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Ok Thanks for that. Could use dry active yeast and hydrate it in warm water. I do this in home brew wine and beer.
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Old 01-20-2014, 01:57 PM   #19
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Old 01-20-2014, 02:31 PM   #20
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My last sourdough culture (AudreyII) I allowed it to dry and I crumbled it, placing it in the freezer. I just wasn't using it fast enough, and rehydrating it as needed works great. Just takes an extra day or two of planning ahead.
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