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Old 10-21-2004, 05:55 PM   #1
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"Authentic" Texas Chili

Chili is a serious subject across this continent and everyone has their own way of making it, as Lifter kindly mentioned in his delicious post on the subject. But, as requested by dear Alix, here is the recipe for “authentic” Texas Chili, given to me by Texas Gov. Ann Richards, avid hunter, great cook, and downright warm, wonderful gal.

As I mentioned under Lifter’s recipe, with tongue in cheek, Texans claim that chili is a Texas creation, a Texas invention, and a Texas tradition! It was created as a cheap food for cowboys, one that could easily be made while riding the hard trails and that would also travel well. In other words, it was quick and easy to make, but could be made to serve lots of people over a long period of time. Following the herds across country, a group of cowboys could start a pot of chili and continually add meat scraps and fat to the pot over the weeks as they traveled…and it only got better as the trail went on.

Think about this for a minute from an historical standpoint. Chili was cowboy food…food made by and for cowboys traveling across the ranges away from civilization back in the 1800s. There were no canned tomatoes, and certainly no fresh tomatoes on the trail. There were no pasta makers, and there certainly weren't any beans very often in real life. (Beans were dried (of course) and required you to soak them in water for a day or more and then boil them for hours more just to make them edible...a whole lots of inconvenient work.) Chili is fast, easy food, and is made up of nothing but ingredients you can travel with safely without refrigeration, or scrounge around and find while you're on the trail. That limited the ingredients to only a few things: meat, chili powder, and possibly a few wild leaks, onions, or a little garlic, and maybe a few wild vegetables on top of that, but darned little.

I encourage you to try this recipe at least once, so you will understand how far this dish has come to its present variations a century and a half later.

Here's how to make real Texas Cowboy Chili. Start with the following ingredients:

2 pounds of coarsely ground beef (not lean!)
2 ounces of animal fat (bacon grease or beef suet--the pork fat is a little better)
2 cloves minced garlic
1 large chopped onion
3-5 tablespoons chili powder (McCormick's is authentic enough, although you can mix your own with cumin, ground red pepper, oregano, cumin, black pepper and salt if you're really, really serious…)

And that’s it -- the entire ingredient list. Nothing more.

First, render your pork or beef fat by frying it over low heat until it melts. An iron skillet is best if you want to be really authentic. Remove the rinds from the fat, if any, then add the coarse ground beef. Brown the beef lightly over medium heat, until it just begins to turn brown. Then add the minced garlic and chopped onions.

Do not drain ANY of the fat off. (I know, I know...!) Continue to cook.

Once the onions begin to become translucent, slowly start sprinkling in the chili powder, stirring slowly and gently as you add it. Once it's blended, reduce the heat and let the chili simmer at a very low, mildly bubbling heat for at least two hours. Stir the chili gently every half hour or so.

Add salt to taste. You shouldn't need much though!

You will notice that the consistency of this chili changes rather dramatically over time, becoming thicker the longer it cooks. You can add a little water if it gets too thick, but keep in mind that it's supposed to be thick – I’ve met more than a few “serious” Texas Chili folk who will tell you that a spoon should stand up if you stick it into a bowl of real chili!

That's it! Two hours, and the chili is ready to eat. However, the longer it cooks, the better it will be! Cook it four hours, six hours, eight hours…start it in the morning and eat it for dinner, whatever. Refrigerate the chili and reheat it the next day, and it will taste even better still!

Sound boring? You will be absolutely astounded with how good it is. Feel free to add a fresh, sliced jalapeno or two for a nice kick. A SINGLE fresh tomato chopped into the mix isn't too far from the original to be sacrilegious to a native Texan. A single chopped green pepper might not hurt either. However, I encourage you to try the plain, original recipe at least once, to understand what it was and perhaps, even, how far the dish has evolved.

Hope you enjoy it, and I hope you'll try the real thing at least once in your life!


** This recipe is attributed to Jim Perry, an exceptional cowboy, cook and fiddler who worked on the XIT Ranch, located primarily in the Texas Panhandle. Jim, by the way, was one of many African-American cowboys that our history has only recently begun to celebrate.

The XIT Ranch (XIT=Ten in Texas) included land in ten counties and was one of the largest ranches in the history of our nation. Its lands were sold to a Chicago company in exchange for constructing our state capitol building, which was completed in 1888.

The exact date of this recipe is unknown, but is estimated to have been created somewhere around 1840.

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Old 10-21-2004, 09:24 PM   #2
 
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Seeing as the 13th century "search for the new world" was in fact trying to get a maritime spice route...

The reason Europe wanted spices was to disguise the smell and taste of rotting meats (there being no refridgeration)

Extend this thinking to the "trail" in the 19th century, and its pretty obvious where the chili powder got evolved....

Lifter

Chili=Texan Stir Fry
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Old 10-21-2004, 09:35 PM   #3
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Lifter (LMAO), you have a very valid point there!!!

Perhaps I omitted the wee important point that chili was a Winter meal???

Too funny!
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Old 10-28-2004, 01:53 PM   #4
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Audeo, Thank you for posting this. This is exactly what I have been looking for. I just have two questions...

1. I was under the impressing that real chili did not use ground beef, but actually used little diced pieces of meat instead. Is this not correct? What are your thoughts on this?

2. In the recipe, you render the pork then add the beef et al. then it says to simmer. Is there liquid somewhere in this that I am missing? Maybe I misunderstand what simmer really means.

This sounds delicious and I can't wait to make it. Thanks so much for posting it and giving us the history behind it as well! I was looking for a good chili recipe to test out my new dutch oven and this is the winner. I will give this a shot on Sat or Sun :)
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Old 10-28-2004, 02:42 PM   #5
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GB, the old stuff surely didn't use ground beef. It was just too much trouble, so diced/cubed meat would be correct.

But there is no additional liquid -- just what comes from the meat. (Yet, if it becomes too thick, I add some water anyway, just not much.) Lifter made an exceptional point, in my opinion, regarding various vegetables that would be found at settlements and homesteads along the way, so you're not going to offend any authenticity by adding another vegetable you find vital, unless it's a daikon radish perhaps...!

I can't wait to hear your opinion -- this is very different from most modern chilis, but it's darned good on my taste buds!

Mega kudos on the bravery, GB! Hope you enjoy it!
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Old 10-28-2004, 03:15 PM   #6
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Thanks for the clarification Audeo. I am very very VERY excited to try this. It sounds fantastic. I will give a review on Monday.
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Old 10-28-2004, 06:07 PM   #7
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Audeo: I took the liberty of copying your entire post onto my computer as I believe it to be of great value (I'm a knowledge loving kind of guy). I know it is to me. I will definitley be trying your the recipe. If there are no objections, I may even make it for next-year's chili cookoff. Thanks for the post. :D

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-29-2004, 12:51 AM   #8
 
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In reviewing the "Texas Chili" concept, I doubt very much if the beef was in fact cut up much more than you will find today's stewing beef, or much different from neck cuts such as stewing beef...

Audeo and I conversed on this point off-Board, and I reminded her that this was beef that was "grass fed", as opposed "feeder lot finished" as we enjoy today...likewise, I've done a fair bit of reading on the 1800's "Western" lifestyle and cooking history...its substantiated in the Laura Ingalls Wilder writings that the drivers of the herds drove them to Chicago for processing, and traded slaughtered "cuts" to settlers in exchange for assistance in herd monitoring and/or the oh so neccessary veggies...certainly, tomatoes and peppers would have been available in such "trades" as would onions or at the very least "leeks", which would have been as good...

Therefore Audeo's comments are likewise spot on the mark in that it would be the weird and wonderful "untradeable parts" that would have been hacked up and tossed into the pot...and by this, I do not mean "diced", but rather "roughly cubed" at best...(and this may be the source of "making the spoon stand up straight" in Texan chili...) but I expect that they were just tearing meat scraps off he bones, to keep the herd from diminishing...

In reference my somewhat "ribald" remark on the evolution of "Chili Powder" as Texas's answer to disguise the "flavour" or "scent" of rotting meats or fats. I mentioned, privately, to Audeo, that there was a "chuck" wagon, with an assigned cook, who gathered firewood and fed it into a (probably) cast iron pan suspended on the wagon, which kept the "chili" working night and day, and marched beside it, ladle in hand, stirring as they went (and, with cattle, this was NOT terribly quickly!) which gives doubt to the "winter" nature of chili...

Anyways, a century and a half later, we get lazy and use "cheap" ground beef, and I'd agree with Audeo that this was hardly available to the cattle drovers...

And it will be terribly "far" from what we'd normally cook today, but its not the only thing that tasted different a hundred odd years ago....and those "cowboys" would have killed for my recipe, with tomato sauce, etc, and extra veggies, just they had a ton of problems accessing it...no matter what they traded, settlers could hardly give up the veggie garden for beef they could neither freeze nor otherwise preserve...

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Old 10-29-2004, 05:03 AM   #9
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If you add a couple of cans of kidney beans, a can of tomato soup, and a can of tomatoes to that chili and I'm there! :P
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Old 10-29-2004, 09:12 AM   #10
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A lot to chew on here -- thank you, gentlemen!

Goodweed, I hope this version serves you exceptionally well in the next competition! I know it has for a couple of folks down here. People are usually surprised to discover that the "secret ingredients" are the dearth of ingredients, instead of additions! It is really tasty stuff for my palate.

Lifter has offered some very thought-provoking comments for me in this thread, helping me to expand my thoughts on the making of chili and cooking and food preparation in general on the trail. (Thank you for the continued reparte, lifter!) We take so very much for granted in our lives today, not the least of which is the foods available to us so readily. And I darned sure agree that the rare availability of beans and tomatoes to this mix would have seemed like mana from the heavens to the cowboy!

As always, I appreciate the thoughts here and very much look forward to your comments after the fact of making the stuff, Goodweed!
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