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Old 02-01-2006, 05:29 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
I felt it was a little on the salty side
Al, an easy way to solve that problem is to add some cooked macaroni, and turn it into chili mac.
"Waste not, want not."
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Old 02-01-2006, 05:49 PM   #12
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Allen; I made a "white" chili for a cookoff last fall. The people who tried it were very suprised by the flavor. They absolutely loved it.

I made it with great white beans, pork, a bit of tomatillo, yellow and green peppers (light yellow dried tobasco peppers are great), just enough chili powder to give it some kick, and some wicked hot sauce from a bottle called "May Produce Side Effects). I also used white pepper in it.

I entered it in the "White Chili" categori as the judges wouldn't let me put it into the Hot-Chili category. The judges were completely floored as they were expecting something that tasted like chicken or turkey soup that was called chili. That's what every other white chili I have tasted in our Northern region tasted like. Mine tasted like chili.

It didn't win anything, but as I said, it was well received by the public who tasted it. In fact, it was more popular than the "red" that I also made. And I had a guy who said that he came back to the cookoff because he'd eaten my "red" the year before.

Why am I telling you about this experience? Because you are a man who understands chili, and isn't afraid to try something new. And Navy or great white (Northern) beans have a milder flavor than do pinto or kidney beans. They aren't better or worse, jsut different.

Another thing you can do to enhance your chili is to add some broken up fresh corn tortillas, or white hominy (has a similar flavor to the tortillas). it goes wonderfully well with the chili flavor and helps thicken the red (or white chili).

I'd love to be able to give you the be-all, end-all chili recipe or technique, but as Robo410 said, it's all in the available ingredients, and the aprticular mood you are in. I'd prbably be safe to say, that on any given day, at any given chili cookoff, that there are a number of excellent chili's, each as good as the other, and that for that particular time, a judge has a hankoring for a specific flavor. And if the contest were to be held on a different day, a different chili would probably win.

Chili is what it is. You make it the way you like it, and the way your family likes it. Surely try different things. Your brisket idea is great. But before using it in chili, play with different smoking woods, as each imparts a different flavor to the meat. You will find that you will like one better than another.

In my opinion, hickory would not be right for chili. I would use either alder, or mesquite. I might use maple or white oak. I don't think apple would be right either. But I'm only taking an educated guess here. Try them and determine what is right for yourself. That's how you learn what works and what doesn't. But then, you already know that.

As i said, you are as good at this as I am, maybe better. So go perfect the flavor you want.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-01-2006, 09:56 PM   #13
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Hiya Goodweed!

One of my coworkers made a White Chili for a cookoff or a potluck. He made it at work. Basically, it just gets chicken, lots of pepperjack, cream, Great Northern Beans, and maybe some cornstarch to tighten it a bit. I tried it, and it was good! I might still throw some tortilla chips in some if I make it, or the hominy you suggested (I love Posole, so I keep some hominy around).

I completely agree with you on the woods used to smoke meat with. I normally use a mix of Hickory and local Red Oak for my pork butt, which gives it a nice flavor. If I ever do smoke a brisket, I'm going to use Mesquite and Red Oak, as brisket is from Texas, and they smoke with Mesquite. I like the flavor the oak provides as well. I may even try to smoke a batch of pork butt with Mesquite, just to see what it's like.

I tried using some local maple last year on chicken, pork butt, and spareribs, and wasn't really pleased. I found that the local maple turned the exterior of the meat coal-black. Now, maybe that processed stuff you can buy would be different. I don't know, as I've never used it, apple, or cherry. I might break down and use some Jack Daniel's barrel chips.
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Old 02-02-2006, 02:04 AM   #14
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Glad to see this thread was resurrected, always love chili recipes and thanks for all of the great ideas. Big Al's recipe sounds great.

When I heard about cinnamon in the stuff it brought back a memory.

A number ofl years ago a friend, who originally hailed from the Cincinnati area, brought us one of those mix packets labelled something like Cincinnati chili mix.

We knew a bit about about Cincinnati chili from TV, mags, friends, and such, but those sources had mostly concentrated on the five ways they serve it. Not what they put in it.

Tried it and the taste of cinnamon was overwhelming.

As I remember we tossed most of the batch.

Googled and found that Cincinnati chili can contain cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, chocolate and coffee.

Believe that a person has a right in this country to toss almost anything into her/his chili and call it that. It is not in the Constitution, but probably should be (that is about as political as I am going to get).

Maybe if put in below the level at which it can be identified, well, heck, it might be OK.

But would probably opt to leave it out.

Same with the cloves and cardamom.

But have become a convert to chocolate in chili. Just a tad. If you know it is there, it is too much. And generally include it. It gives it an interesting flavor.

As for the coffee, am kinda kicking that about. Am not a fan of coffee in most dishes, but it might just work. Just a tad. Am not sure.

Anyway there is nothing better than a good bowl of red, thanks for the thread.
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Old 02-02-2006, 02:06 AM   #15
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Glad to see this thread was resurrected, always love chili recipes and thanks for all of the great ideas. Big Al's recipe sounds great.

When I heard about cinnamon in the stuff it brought back a memory.

A number ofl years ago a friend, who originally hailed from the Cincinnati area, brought us one of those mix packets labelled something like Cincinnati chili mix.

We knew a bit about about Cincinnati chili from TV, mags, friends, and such, but those sources had mostly concentrated on the five ways they serve it. Not what they put in it.

Tried it and the taste of cinnamon was overwhelming.

As I remember we tossed most of the batch.

Googled and found that Cincinnati chili can contain cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, chocolate and coffee.

Believe that a person has a right in this country to toss almost anything into her/his chili and call it that. It is not in the Constitution, but probably should be (that is about as political as I am going to get).

Maybe if put in below the level at which it can be identified, well, heck, it might be OK.

But would probably opt to leave it out.

Same with the cloves and cardamom.

But have become a convert to chocolate in chili. Just a tad. If you know it is there, it is too much. And generally include it. It gives it an interesting flavor.

As for the coffee, am kinda kicking that about. Am not a fan of coffee in most dishes, but it might just work. Just a tad. Am not sure.

Anyway there is nothing better than a good bowl of red, thanks for the thread.
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Old 02-02-2006, 11:11 AM   #16
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auntdot, I hear you about the cinnamon being strong. My first version of this had, I believe, a full tablespoon of cinnamon in it. It was way to strong. Now, I've dropped it down to the point that you can't pick it out of the flavor medley, but you know that something is in there.

I've been kicking around the coffee idea as well. However, that's going to be a very tough sell to my family, especially PeppA, as she absolutely detests coffee, even the smell of it. I'd have to really fiddle with how much coffee to use, since I have instant right now. I would either start with 1/4 t of instant coffee granules, or, I could just make a mugfull of coffee and add a little, taste, add a little more, taste, etc., until I get it right. Of course, then I'd have to drink the remainder coffee, but that's a good thing.

Maybe do a batch of "cowboy" chili, with the smoked brisket, and use some really strong "cowboy" coffee? OMG, I've giving myself ideas again. I'm not going to sleep easy tonight, knowing I have a project in mind, and won't be able to do it anytime soon.
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