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Old 04-09-2012, 07:09 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I would agree that no matter the rest of the varied ingredients, the use of MASA as a thickener can make all the difference for a winner of a recipe. I had to buy a 5 lb bag several years ago, just to make chili and I now have a lifetime supply as I have no intention of making anything else with it.

Don't forget the Masa.
I can't find MASA here, so I buy it in MN (of all places--such a huge Mexican population in N MN). I learnt the hard way that it should be kept in the freezer...one of my unopened bags was full of bugs when I opened it. But I agree, MASA makes a huge difference and I'm glad I twigged to that for chili, etc.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:02 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I can't find MASA here, so I buy it in MN (of all places--such a huge Mexican population in N MN). I learnt the hard way that it should be kept in the freezer...one of my unopened bags was full of bugs when I opened it. But I agree, MASA makes a huge difference and I'm glad I twigged to that for chili, etc.
Actually, I don't think that Masa is more prone to bugs than anything else. I've had that 5 lb bag in my pantry for years and it's still bug free. You're right though, if space permits (not for me) anything like that is safer in the freezer.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:06 PM   #63
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Any grain ground to a meal or flour can contain bug larva. They are a no cost addition from the mill.

To solve the problem, place the bag of flour or meal in the freezer for three days. This will permanently kill the larva and you can take it out of the freezer and store it in a cabinet or pantry.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:33 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Looks like ingredients have been well covered. You might want to consider simplicity. Make a chili powder with 2-3 ground chilis (a little cascabell, ancho and California), paprika, ground cumin. You choose the combination, but I would caution the use of more than one hottie in the mix. A simple sofrito of onion, garlic and 1 type of fresh green chili. Personally, I would not use tomato as it adds too much acid that will have to be balanced with something. Mexican oregano for sure and more cumin, freshly ground. Sneak in a little chipotle in adobo. S&P and as previously mentioned, masa as the thickener. For liquid, beef stock or water. Just my idea how to approach it considering the folks being served.
Yeah all of those are good ideas. Particularly the oregano and cumin. And of course if it doesn't have chili peppers then it isn't chili!

(highlighted above) I balance the tomatoes with sugar. It seems to work for me.

I'm intrigues by the comments about cocoa powder or chocolate. That reminds me of mole sauce which features cocoa or chocolate plus chiles. That sounds like Mexican or Central/South American chili to me. I'm tempted to dump a bottle of mole sauce in my chili some time. Or use some chocolate, probably unsweetened, then add sugar to my chili to taste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I would agree that no matter the rest of the varied ingredients, the use of MASA as a thickener can make all the difference for a winner of a recipe. I had to buy a 5 lb bag several years ago, just to make chili and I now have a lifetime supply as I have no intention of making anything else with it.

Don't forget the Masa.
I don't know how long masa lasts. I hope you keep it in a tightly sealed container. It's so inexpensive I suggest you discard it after perhaps 3 years or so, and get new. Even better, try making some tortillas or tamales some day. It would be interesting if there are any casseroles featuring masa as a sort of bread component.

As I said I first became acquainted with using masa as a thickener from Carroll Shelby's chili mix. It worked well with the mix and I later used masa when making chili from my own recipes from scratch, to good effect.

It seems to me that the masa adds more than thickening. I think it adds a subtle but good corn taste. Does anybody agree with this or am I just imagining that the masa changes the taste at all?
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:15 PM   #65
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from Greg:
" I think it adds a subtle but good corn taste. Does anybody agree with this or am I just imagining that the masa changes the taste at all?"

I would agree with that...it also has a slightly sweet corn taste. My Texan Grandfather used Masa in both his beef chili and his wonderful white chicken chili.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:40 PM   #66
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Where does the term "white chili" come from? I guess as starters chicken or turkey provides less browning than beef, and pretty sure tomatoes are ruled out for "white chili." Is that a good guess?
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:21 AM   #67
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I would consider who the judges are or will be. If your picking patients or doctors or someone really into chili the goal to please might be totally different. Bobby Flay loses Throwdown when gives them something too different that what they are used to. People get stuck on things.

With that being said, I like mine with only meat,chilis,onions,beer and spices. Cumin, pepper ang garlic being the major ones. I also prefer cubed over ground beef.
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:33 AM   #68
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Fiona - If it was me I'd start with bbq Tri-tip...chill after cooking and then cut it into cubes 1/2" or smaller.. I use NO tomato or beans...a variation of Tex-Mex chili...the rest is secret beyond the usual spices and a pinch of cornstarch to thicken...
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Old 04-10-2012, 10:23 AM   #69
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Here's the white chili recipe that got me a trophy at a local chili contest. Modify as needed if you're interested in making it a DC recipe.
2009 United Way Chili Cook-off, 1rst-place Prize-Winning Recipe, White Chili Category – Chief Lognwind's’ White Chili

In past years, I made this same basic recipe, but with chicken or pork as the meat, and with more potent hot peppers. So this year, I tweaked the herbs and spices, changed to ground beef, and reduced the heat. Everyone who has tried this recipe has fallen in love with it. It’s not as pretty as red chili, but it sure does taste great. Try this recipe on a cool fall night. It’ll warm you to your toes.

Ingredients:
* 24 oz. (3 cups) Great Northern Beans, cooked
* 24 oz. Pinto Beans, cooked
* ½ cup Salsa Verde (available in most grocery stores)
* 1 large white onion, diced
* ½ cup chopped green onion
* 1 tbs. Sriracha brand Pepper Sauce
* 2 tbs. Coriander, ground
* 1 tbs. Cumin, ground
* 2 stalks Celery, sliced with leaves
* 1 ½ lb. Ground Beef (80/20 grind)
* 2 tsp. Kosher Salt, or 1 ½ tsp. table salt
* 3 tbs. fresh Cilantro, chopped
* 2, one-inch Serrano Chile Peppers, minced
* ½ tsp. white pepper, ground (or you can use black pepper)
* 2 cups heavy cream (1 pint)
* ½ cup Masa Harina (can be found next to the corn meal at
your grocers)
* 3 tbs. cooking oil

Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the diced onion. Sauté over medium heat while stirring until the onion begins to soften (about 2 minutes). Add the ground beef and flatten out. Let cook for about 5 minutes and then break it up. Stir and cook until the meat has lightly browned. Add the remaining ingredients, except for the Masa Harina, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for two hours, stirring every twenty minutes or so to prevent the chili from sticking. Taste the chili and correct the seasoning to your taste (add more salt if needed).
Place the Masa Harina into an eight ounce cup along with just enough water to form a thick paste. Stir with a fork until all the lumps are removed. Slowly stir in two tbs. more water. This is called slurry. Stir the Masa Harina slurry into the chili, and again cover. Let it all cook over low heat for an additional ten minutes. Stir and test to see if the chili is thick enough for you. If so, then you are ready to serve up a bowl- full or two to your family. But remember, like all great chili, this is even better the next day. So if you can, cool it in an ice bath and place in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s dinner. Serve it with some good cornbread, or nachos.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:55 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Where does the term "white chili" come from? I guess as starters chicken or turkey provides less browning than beef, and pretty sure tomatoes are ruled out for "white chili." Is that a good guess?
I make mine with grilled chicken or turkey breast, chicken or turkey stock, no tomatoes.
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