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Old 02-22-2016, 04:33 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Bushrod View Post
I thicken with tomato paste.
Thats what I probably would have done, although I don't think the lentils are a bad idea at all.
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:05 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Bushrod View Post
I thicken with tomato paste.
Yep. Thickens it up nicely. My wife prefers chili soup, but I like mine good and hearty, more like stew. I also have never added any water to mine. I like to put in a can of Hunt's diced fire roasted tomatoes, and that along with tomato sauce is all the liquid I need.
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:07 PM   #13
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It was an experiment. I find that too much tomato creates too much tomato flavor for me. I don't use past in my chili, at least not anymore. And you're all correct, usually the can liquid, and the liquid from the canned beans makes it just right.

This time though, I used dried beans. When the water was used up, the beans were almost cooked perfectly. I added more water, maybe a little excessively, to make sure the beans were perfectly hydrated. The flavor I was shooting for was pure Eastern U.P. chili. Up here, most people have no idea what Masa Harina is, and it would be an unfamiliar flavor. They would probably enjoy it, as it is a wonderful flavor, to me. That is why I needed to add something with a more bean-like flavor that would be neutral, as the chili already had lots of both pinto, and kidney beans. It came out very tasty indeed, with a good consistency.

I just can't seem to leave well enough alone. I'm always trying to find new culinary techniques to throw at my food. I'm not saying that this is the ultimate thickener for chili, it's just another tool in the tool chest. I probably won't use it again, as I like my chili a little bit more loose as well. Simply sharing what I've learned.

Besides, I had too many packages of dried lentils in the pantry, and my wife doesn't like them. In the chili, you couldn't even tell that they were there, except that the texture was thicker.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:17 PM   #14
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Chief, I'm thinking the lentils would be a great addition to a meatless, vegetarian chili.
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:47 PM   #15
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"I just can't seem to leave well enough alone. "

The truth and the answer in one sentence. Lentils seems reasonable to me.

I like a thicker chili. Masa is my preferred thickener, if necessary. I grew up on Mom's chili Soup, which she often served over mashed potatoes as a gravy sauce. And a thin sauce it was. I like the tater part, and will do this sometimes, then it's thicker the next day. You don't have that luxury if making for a church group.
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Old 02-23-2016, 08:11 AM   #16
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I grew up on the thin, soupy kind, and it was delicious. Saltine crackers were added to thicken it, or sometimes it topped white rice. My inlaw's chili was made from what was called a con carne brick, and had all of the beans and seasonings, fat and tomato all made into a brick, that when heated in a pot, melted down into chili. You just added ground beef and ate it all. That's DW's favorite chili. I've never seen it outside El Cajon, Ca. though.

Ah, chili, so many variations, many of them great. I've certainly tasted bad chili though, and yet, the people who made them thought that their version was the best ever. Who am I to judge? There is only a few things I know to be absolutely true concerning chili, earthworms don't belong in it; it doesn't belong in your shoe; and when made right (per family expectations), everyone is your friend.

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Old 02-23-2016, 08:56 AM   #17
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I trick I learned watching a veteran Brunswick stew maker was to used instant potato mix. It works well on lots of soups as it add little flavor. Another trick I saw was to take some type of pasta, like shells, straight out of the box into the mix. It absorbs massive amounts of water very quickly and it fairly easy to take out, or in the case of chili adds another level.
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Old 02-24-2016, 06:01 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post

Ah, chili, so many variations, many of them great. I've certainly tasted bad chili though, and yet, the people who made them thought that their version was the best ever. Who am I to judge? There is only a few things I know to be absolutely true concerning chili, earthworms don't belong in it; it doesn't belong in your shoe; and when made right (per family expectations), everyone is your friend.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Ahh... so true there are so many good chilies in the world.

And are you talking about my sisters chili when you say bad that the creator believes is the best ever? Sure sounds like it.

I agree that chili doesn't belong in your shoe. But you never know about ingredients. Earthworms might just add that special touch.
Perhaps you shouldn't cook them in a paper cup before you add them to the chili?

Eons ago I saw on the boob tube (Might have been the Mike Douglas Show. And I'm showing my age) People loving a chocolate chip cookie they were served. The secret ingredient was revealed to be earth worms.



Lentils sound perfectly acceptable to me Chief. I like a thick chili and they are in the bean family.

Keep on tweeking and never leave well enough alone.
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Old 02-24-2016, 06:15 PM   #19
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A dear friend, who once owned a restaurant with her husband, had a bunch of us over for chili an eon or two ago. It tasted like it was cooked in dishwater. We choked it down anyway. Lentils would have been a great improvement.
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Old 02-25-2016, 04:17 PM   #20
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All these are very well, yes?

Joyce makes hers of ground beef and her tomato sauce which she makes of her garden. She thicks this of corn starch after she adds of the sharp cheese. It is quite nice and very thick so as to have shovels of the Fritos scoops or nice pretzel crisps.

Love,
~Cat
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