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Old 01-05-2009, 07:26 PM   #21
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[quote=MexicoKaren;763550]JP, I once spent a few weeks in Santa Fe in October...some friends and I rented a house. One of things we did was buy a bushel of green chiles and roast them on the backyard barbecue. Then, we made mounds of chiles rellenos, and froze the rest - transported them back to Oregon in dry ice. They were wonderful. Those chiles are very similar to the poblanos we use here. And the air was full of the smell of them roasting everywhere. It was a lovely trip and the first time I ate real tamales...my friends, who used to live there, drove us about 25 miles to a little town called Chimayo (with a wonderful shrine) and we bought them from a woman who lived there. Sat at a picnic table in her yard, just like in Mexico! They were wonderful.

So you know the difference The shrine in Chimayo is very famous I have been there a couple times very much like old Mexico. When I was very much younger I made it to the famous church in Puebla outside of Mexico City and I made it to the town in the 1970s San Christobal de las Casas in Chiapas and went to the famous church outside of town that belonged to the indians with palm fronds on the floor and very old statues of saints they were quite protective even in those days on who could enter the church I did get in and it was quite an experience although I would appreciate it much more now than when I was eighteen and traveling just to travel. Chimayo is famous for the healing dirt just as a church in Taos is famous for a painting and the stair case in Santa Fe.
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:21 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
Chile Verde. Is this any different than Salsa Verde? Or more like a stew that includes meat?
I know the thread just focused on the "Chile Verde" part of the question and not much of the "Salsa Verde" part of the question.

Salsa Verde = Green Sauce in Spanish
Salsa Verde = Green Sauce in Italian

Now... "salsa verde" in Mexico is one thing (tomatillos, garlic, chiles, etc)... then there is "salsa verde" in Italy (parsley, capers, garlic, anchovies, olive oil)... and then there is "salsa verde" in Spain (olive oil, flour, white wine, garlic, parsley). Three very different preparations for three very different sauces that happen to be green.
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Old 01-05-2009, 08:57 PM   #23
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just curious - I've noticed in some restaurants in New Mexico that the salsa verde is served warm and the regular red salsa is cold. Can anyone explain why? (I don't know, I'm asking y'all....)
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Old 01-05-2009, 09:06 PM   #24
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Chile verde = green chile.

Green chile is the cornerstone of New Mexican cuisine. Google "green chile" and you'll get an abundance of information, recipes and sources.

Here in New Mexico, green chiles are roasted and frozen for use throughout the year. They are used in stews, soups, casseroles, omelets etc etc etc. They are stuffed, used as a pizza topping and you've never had a burger until you've had a Green Chile Cheeseburger!

Spend a few minutes and check out some of the many websites with green chile information. You'll get quite an education.
a little of topic.. but when i first moved to new mexico i can remember going to the local mcdonalds and them asking me if i wanted red or green chili on my burger.. i was lost.. after 8 yrs i can honestly say i love green chili and if i ever move away it is something that i will definitely have shipped.. i put it in everything..
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:28 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by ndnstarr View Post
a little of topic.. but when i first moved to new mexico i can remember going to the local mcdonalds and them asking me if i wanted red or green chili on my burger.. i was lost.. after 8 yrs i can honestly say i love green chili and if i ever move away it is something that i will definitely have shipped.. i put it in everything..
I know what you mean. I'm a green guy too!
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:32 PM   #26
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I have copied the linked recipe and will make it soon.

One thought. It seems that 4 chiles total for this recipe seems like it's not enough. Not for a lack of heat but for enough chile flavor.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:21 AM   #27
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I am totally with MexicoKaren on the Chile Verde. I learned from Leo Tumamait, who learned from his mother, who learned from her mother, ad infinitum...Leo sold Tamales in all the local bars at Christmas-time. The Chile Verde were his biggest seller. And Salsa Verde...I always serve it cold, and always serve it with fish tacos. Make the Salsa Verde first, while the fire burns down, then bbq the fish and set aside, throw the griddle on the fire, oil it and heat the tortillas. Back in the day, we used to drive down Baja on the ocean side and stop to surf, but we also stopped at every roadside stand for fish tacos (and beer). Salsa Verde in summer, Chile Verde in winter.
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:39 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobagirl
I've noticed in some restaurants in New Mexico that the salsa verde is served warm
It was probably warm because they had just made it. You have to boil the tomatillos for about 5-8 minutes and then whirl them in the blender with the other ingredients, then chill. That meant it was very FRESH.

Andy, you may be right about the chiles...I would probably add more, especially if I were using serranos. Adding a few poblanos would give you more chile flavor without adding alot of heat.

Giggler, we live on the west coast of Mexico in a town of about 8,000 people thaty is 12 miles up the coast from Puerto Vallarta. It is heaven on earth.

Gadzooks, we had the most wonderful huichinango (red snapper) cooked whole on the fire with some Mexican friends on Christmas Eve. I am going to make it very soon and I'll report on the results.

And JP? I've never been to Puebla, but we have a friend who is moving there next summer, so we'll definitely go visit him there. I also have a friend who moved to San Cristobal in Chiapas. Very very different from here, and not many gringos. I look forward to visiting him as well.
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Old 01-06-2009, 11:00 AM   #29
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Thanks, Karen!
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Old 01-13-2009, 08:05 AM   #30
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I made this Sunday night - Rave reviews - Thank you so much for posting.

AC

I chopped the chili's small, about 1/8". I tasted to make sure that they were not too hot. With Jalopinos, you never know, could go either way. I did the same for the Poblano's.

I want to try Chili Releno, I need a good recipe.

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