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Old 10-15-2009, 12:16 PM   #11
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You say you used 2t of chili powder, but do not say how much meat you used. I would think that would probably not be enough. You should be thinking in tablespoons, not teaspoons for the chili powder.
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Old 10-15-2009, 02:54 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by vyapti View Post
Dried chilies are cheap and easy to prepare... All it takes is to chop up the dried pepper, remove the seeds and grind it in a coffee/spice grinder. The result is much, much better quality spice.
Vyapti, I envy you! Knowing me, I'd get hot chili powder, Scotch Bonnets or something equally "risen from hell" pepper all over my hands and then go to wipe my eyes!!! I know... I'd only do that once... but that's why I prefer my chili heat in a liquid form - for safety.
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Old 10-15-2009, 10:47 PM   #13
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You say you used 2t of chili powder, but do not say how much meat you used. I would think that would probably not be enough. You should be thinking in tablespoons, not teaspoons for the chili powder.
That was my first thought. Definitely up the amount of chili powder.
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Old 10-15-2009, 11:54 PM   #14
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Garden variety "chili powder" (cumin, paprika, small amounts of garlic and onion powder, and an even smaller amount of cayenne) won't give you any "umph" at all.

I stunned my culinary arts professor in HS by taking a big fat handful of his chili powder and eating it by itself. There's no "umph" to be had in that stale old rubbish.

Consider also, "chili" is a native southwestern dish. Use native peppers - Cayenne comes from French Guiana via Louisiana. Jalapeno, Poblano, Pasilla, these are the kinds of chiles that the Texan cowboys would have used, because they were more readily available in the region, growing wild or sold by the local Hispanic fruit mongers where they also procured their tomatoes.
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:10 AM   #15
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I would say that depends on where you get your chili powder TheMetalChef. The stuff I get most certainly is not stale and most people would have a huge problem eating it straight without a gallon of milk at the ready. If you buy quality spices then you are more likely to have chili powder with umph.
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Old 10-18-2009, 07:27 PM   #16
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You say you used 2t of chili powder, but do not say how much meat you used. I would think that would probably not be enough. You should be thinking in tablespoons, not teaspoons for the chili powder.
i have a chicken casserole that calls for chili powder. in four or five times of making it, i gradually have upped the chili powder to 4 tablespoons . since i use so much chili powder it doesn't go bad. (i don't think) in other cooking for a bit more heat, i use red pepper flakes. it gives just a bit of heat in back of throat.
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:46 PM   #17
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I would say that depends on where you get your chili powder TheMetalChef. The stuff I get most certainly is not stale and most people would have a huge problem eating it straight without a gallon of milk at the ready. If you buy quality spices then you are more likely to have chili powder with umph.
Which would be why I said "garden variety", as in the weak red powder that sits in most mega-marts.
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Old 10-18-2009, 10:19 PM   #18
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Hi,
I put together a ccc today with
mincemeat, two teaspoons chilli power,
tin of chilli beans in chilli sauce
2 teaspoons cornflower etc onions etc
it was OK but it did nt have that umph, that strong,
... burning... chilli taste.
was there something else I sh have done ?
some special chilli sauce or something,
maybe the chilli powder was nt up to it
thanks for any tips
Tim
Don't use ground beef. Get a large peice of chuck cut it into 1/4" cubes. Brown them in a cast iron skillet will some vegtable oil or if you have it bacon fat. Up the heat with high your own blend of spices and skip the preblended stuff. Go with some good chili flake, cayan, some smoked paprika, cumin (ground fresh if you can), garlic powder, onion powder. Cook it low and slow.
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Old 10-24-2009, 11:33 AM   #19
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I guess it's time a Texan that has been making and eating chili all their life threw their "dos centavos" in on this subject.

Not all chili powders are fiery hot freshly ground right from the factory, or made at home (Gebharts, Fort Worth Light, McCormick's Texas Style are all fairly mild). They are a spice blend that is used for its flavor - not trying to make the top 10 on the Scoville chart. Many prize winning chili cooks will use more than one brand of chili powder to get the taste they want if they don't make their own from scratch, and then use cayenne to adjust the heat. If you want that 3-alarm burns all the way down feeling, add some cayenne or other hot chili peppers to the mix. But then again, how hot they are is a subjective opinion - one person's "bland and boring" might be another person's "too hot and spicy for me".

Adding beans to your chili is your choice, it traditionally is taboo here in TX and forbidden in chili cooking competitions. I don't because I find it "dilutes" my chili. Some people will get a bowl of beans (pintos) "on the side" so they can add some to tone down their bowl of chili if it is a little too spicy for them.

Regarding "ground" meat ... the regular "hamburger" grind is a little too fine for most chili lovers that I know. We have "chili grind" available in the regular grocery stores that is coarse and about 1/4 inch diameter. This is a lot easier and more convenient that dicing the meat into little 1/4 cubes. Of course, if you have a store that still has a butcher that can grind the meat for you, something that is getting harder and harder to find, you can select the cuts of meat you want and have that ground for you.

The basic ingredients in most chili recipes is the meat (beef or a mix of beef and pork), tomatoes (puree or paste usually), a mix of ground hot and mild chili peppers, onion, garlic, Mexican oregano, paprika, cumin, salt (some or all of these are in chili powders with variations in amounts). Some people use beer, or stock or just plain old water for the liquid. Thickening, if necessary or desired, is usually with a slurry of masa flour (masa de harina which a little different than plain corn flour but both will work) and water added toward the end of cooking - about the last 5-10 minutes.

I don't know if your store carries them but there are some decent chili making "kits" (the spices and directions) on the market. The best, in my opinion, are either Carroll Shelby's or Wick Fowler's 2-Alarm or 3-Alarm chili fixin's. These are usually in the spice section or if you have a Mexican food section they might be there. They are, at least, a good starting point - you can always gussy them up with a little more of this or that if you want. Oh, Carroll Shelby and Wick Fowler are both award winning champion chili cooks.

If you want to look at some chili recipes to get some more ideas:

Recipes from past winners of the Terlingua International Chili Championship

Carroll Shelby's Chili Recipe - this site has some other recipes, some that include beans! On Shelby's recipe - if you don't want to use the cheese you can use corn flour for the thickening, and for the beer I would use a lager or something like Bass or Harp (Carroll used Lone Star if I remember right).

LOL ... I think I know what I'm having for supper tonight ....

(and this doesn't even get into the green chili's of New Mexico and Arizona ...)
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:27 AM   #20
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You need cumin; chili won't taste right at all without it.
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