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Old 08-06-2005, 11:13 AM   #11
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I seldom make anything the same way twice, but this turned out to be the best one I ever made, so I wrote it down while I could still remember what I put in it:

Connie's Best Chili

2 lb ground chuck, browned, drained & crumbled
2 lbs hot style pork "roll sausage" (Jimmy Dean or your choice)
4 30 oz cans Bush's chili hot beans w/juice (no subs)
4 16 oz cans tomato puree
2 29 oz cans tomato sauce
1 large onion,chopped
2 large greenpeppers, diced
1 tbl minced garlic
3 tbls brown sugar
2 tbl cumin
4 tbls chili powder
1 tbl salt
1 tsp pepper
Louisian Red Hot Sauce to taste
2 tbl olive oil
CHEESE DIP
1 lb. Velveeta Cheese
approx. 1 to 1-1/2 cups Pace Piquante Sauce (I use mild, but you could use medium, or even hot if you dare)

Prepare Cheese dip while chili is cooking. Cube the Velveeta, add 1 cup of the Piquante Sauce, and nuke in microwave, stirring, until melted. Add more sauce if needed. Good to nibble on while chili is cooking.

In large pot over medium heat, sweat onions, peppers and garlic in olive oil until soft. Cook meat in microwave or skillet and drain well in colander, mashing with fork to get out the grease. Add meat, beans and tomato products to pot and mix well. Raise heat to med/high, and continue to stir and cook as you add remaining ingredients. Simmer, adjusting seasoning, until 6-pack of beer or bottle of wine is gone. Serve up in bowls with a dollap of Cheese Dip on top and tortilla chips on the side.

*Note: Sometimes I add a can of butter beans and/or crowder peas, just because I like them.
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Old 08-06-2005, 06:38 PM   #12
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I love to put whole (seed removed) black olives in my chili - I have a recipe with pumpkin puree and black beans in it that's really good - I'm pretty sure it's here in the chili sub forum. You'd be surprised what a wonderful taste it creates - you're gonna come up with some kickin' chili - I can tell!
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Old 08-13-2005, 08:41 PM   #13
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Threw a quick white chili together today and it may have changed my mind about the unique chili I'm going to make. Let me know what you think

Ingredients:
2 cups Great Northern Beans
1 tsp. ground Cummin
1 tsp. ground Coriander
1/2 lb. cubed pork
1 tbs. cooking oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 fresh Roma Tomatoes. cubed, with seeds and liquid
2 stalks celery, sliced
7 dried chile peppers
4 dried Tobasco peppers
1/2 tsp. ground white pepper

Heat the oil and add the meat, and peppers. When the meat is lightly browned, add the tomatoes. Let cook for about five minutes, stirring frequently. Add the remaining ingredients and fold together. Reduce heat to lowest simmer and let cook for about 2 hours. Stir every once in a while to prevent sticking. Taste and add more salt, cummin, and/or coriander to taste.

This chili came out fairly blonde, but had a bold flavor. The pepper heat in the mouth came upon me slowly, though I could tell it was there. About half way through the bowlfull, I started to feel it. By the time the bowl was empty, I needed something to drink and my eyes were starting to water a bit. But there was no immediate burning. It was actually very pleasant and warm. This could be a favorite on a cold autumn or winter day. The tomato added only its sweetness. There was no characteristic acidity as there is in my red version.

I'm still thinking of adding the lentils as a thickening agent, though this was pretty thick on its own. I also like the green color imparted by the cooked orange lentils. I will probably add white hominy as well to the competition batch.

The other chili, I have decided, will be the Classic Midwester Chili (CMC) with veggies, ground beef, onion, tomato, celery, lots of chili powder, and some dried chiles. I'm also going to take ideas that I've learned from all of you and incorporate them into the CMC. I'll be adding unsweetened chocolate, allspice, and either fresh corn tortillas, or masa harina to thicken and add flavor.

This will be fun.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-01-2005, 08:13 PM   #14
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GOODWEED,

I think cinnamon in chili is bizzare but in Cinncinnati they have chili with cinnamon and what ever i believe the greeks in Cinncinnati invented this recipe but coming from the southwest it was not what I crave. I,ve had it there but did not like it.It's not real chili they {but then again thats my opinion.theyserve it as they call 5 ways I dont remember all the ways but a few included pouring it on pasta,onions and so forth they actually have chains of retaurants with this chili.I must say cinnamon is good in certain dishes is great like roasted red pepper sauce for cheese stuffed shell pasta and alot of your moroccan dishes I made a beef,barley spinach soup and added a little bit of cinnamon and it was devine.
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Old 09-01-2005, 08:33 PM   #15
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Your recipe sounds great Goodweed!!! That's the way I like to feel the heat - partway through and then glad it's gone!
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Old 09-01-2005, 11:41 PM   #16
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I've tried adding Mexican Chocolate (Abuelita Brand, made by Nestle) to a few batches of chili, but by the time I noticed anything, it was way to sweet for me. I've even tried using cocoa powder, but didn't really notice any flavor change.

I've been meaning to try adding some beer to my chili, but I'm not sure how PeppA would take to that (she just about read me the riot act a few days ago when I added some wine to spaghetti sauce).

Has anyone ever tried adding coffee to chili? I've heard that some folks are adding coffee to different sauces, for added flavor.
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:48 AM   #17
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Chocolate, coffee and cinnamon are added to chili often in very traditional Mexican recipes - not called 'chili', but often called moles, tinga (stew), or sopa.


They all add very subtle undertones of flavor; the coffee and chocolate 'deepen' the other flavors and support them; an example would be when you put a little coffee into a brownie recipe. You should use unsweetened chocolate or cocoa; Mexican chocolate is a mixture meant to be used for drinking. When I use coffee, I make a little 'syrup' out of about 1 tablespoon of espresso powder and enough water to make a thin paste, then add it in; it goes in toward the end of the cooking, as does chocolate.

Re cinnamon, again it's added in very small amounts, and just adds a 'scent' of flavor - almost subtle to make you ask, 'what is that?'

Re beer in chili, that's also in traditional recipes; somewhere I have a 'tinga de la puerca borracha' recipe; 'stew of drunken pork'! Use a dark beer, Mexican like Dos Equis, or a nice brown ale. It's added as part of the liquid in the beginning of the recipe, and again by the time it's cooked down, just adds another layer.
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Old 09-02-2005, 09:06 AM   #18
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I've been meaning to make some Mole sauce. That's also what I've been trying to create in my chili, is a Mole-flavored chili, but due to my inexperience with Mole, haven't been able to do much.

I've got several Mole recipes, and I just need to up and make one sometime. Getting my family to eat, will be the challenge!
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Old 09-02-2005, 04:00 PM   #19
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I agree that the chocolate has to be completely unsweetened, and that it adds a hint of flavor, but more importantly, strengthens the other flavors. I could see how coffee would do that. But as I am a faithful and practising member of the LDS faith, I would be hypocritical using it.

This is a very worthwhile thread. I've been able to get some great ideas. And for everyone else who isn't in a chili contest, take these ideas to heart anyway. You might just make the best chili you've ever tasted by trying a few of these ideas.

Thanks everyone.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-02-2005, 06:57 PM   #20
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Allen, if you can get your hands on Zarela Martinez' book on Oxacan cooking, you'll get a real 'feel' for cooking moles - she does a whole chapter on it!

Also, Rick Bayless' books are great for learning to understand the sometimes complex art of making mole!

Happy Cooking!
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