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Old 12-16-2011, 10:24 PM   #21
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Greattt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
January's Food & Wine magazine has a Shrimp_and_Pork Dumplings with Bamboo Shoots recipe that looks interesting, and none of their recipes have ever failed me
That recipe looks great! Thank you for providing it to me :)
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:05 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nall View Post
All of those sound delicious. I'd love to learn about the potato dumplings and the dumplings with flour for a dish like chicken and dumplings!
Forgive me for my culinary ignorance, what is Dim Sum? Thank's for the quick reply :)
Timothy has already explained Dim Sum. If you want to try some, you might start with "Pot Stickers". Depending on where you live, you can pick up wonton wrappers at the grocery and skip making the dough part. But there is nothing compared to the soft, homemade dough used for many of the dumplings that are just steamed. The different dipping sauces just add to the wonderful experience of Dim Sum.

My German culinary ancestry exposed me to a potato dumpling about the size of a baseball. These were served as base for Sauerbraten (sour beef). My grandmothers recipe "pickeled" the beef over several days and when cooked a gravy, thickened with gingersnap cookies, was served with the beef over the dumplings. The dumplings were made from baked potatos that were peeled and riced while still very warm. Just enough flour was added to the potatos to make a dough that wasn't sticky. These dumplings had a tablespoon of stuffing in the center. The stuffing was bread cubes, celery, onion and poultry seasoning. The dumplings were cooked in boiling, salted water until they floated. They were great with the braten but even better when the extras were sliced, fried in butter and served with eggs for breakfast the next day! We made sure there were always extras! A German peasant dish that stretched and "hid" the often "turning" meat.

Craig
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Old 12-17-2011, 02:03 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Timothy has already explained Dim Sum. If you want to try some, you might start with "Pot Stickers". Depending on where you live, you can pick up wonton wrappers at the grocery and skip making the dough part. But there is nothing compared to the soft, homemade dough used for many of the dumplings that are just steamed. The different dipping sauces just add to the wonderful experience of Dim Sum.

My German culinary ancestry exposed me to a potato dumpling about the size of a baseball. These were served as base for Sauerbraten (sour beef). My grandmothers recipe "pickeled" the beef over several days and when cooked a gravy, thickened with gingersnap cookies, was served with the beef over the dumplings. The dumplings were made from baked potatos that were peeled and riced while still very warm. Just enough flour was added to the potatos to make a dough that wasn't sticky. These dumplings had a tablespoon of stuffing in the center. The stuffing was bread cubes, celery, onion and poultry seasoning. The dumplings were cooked in boiling, salted water until they floated. They were great with the braten but even better when the extras were sliced, fried in butter and served with eggs for breakfast the next day! We made sure there were always extras! A German peasant dish that stretched and "hid" the often "turning" meat.

Craig

What a great reply ! Thanks for teaching me that family recipe and taking the time to explain it carefully :) I will definitely try it, already got it on the list "Recipes to do". Thanks agai Craig :)
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Old 12-17-2011, 02:25 PM   #24
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Sauerbraten with potato dumplings:

Sauerbraten


Ingredients:
  • 3-4 pound roast of venison (or beef chuck)
  • 1 bottle of red wine
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 Tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp juniper berries
  • 1 Tbsp mustard seed
  • 6-8 cloves
  • 3-5 bay leaves
  • 1 Tbsp dried thyme
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup melted butter or olive oil
  • 8 ginger snap cookies
  • 3 Tbsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp flour
  • Salt
Instructions:

Bring marinade ingredients -- wine, vinegar, water, peppercorns, juniper, mustard, cloves, bay leaves, thyme, celery, carrots and onion -- to a boil and turn off the heat. Allow to cool. Submerge the venison in the marinade and let it sit in the fridge for at least 24 hours, and up to 5 days. Three days is a good length of time. When you are ready to cook, take the roast out of the marinade and salt it well. Set it aside for 15-20 minutes or so.

Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Actually, 225 is a better temperature, but the roast can take up to 8 hours to properly cook then; this is what I do at home on weekends. At 275 degrees, the roast will probably take about 5 hours to cook. You can go up to 300 degrees a typical venison roast will be ready in 3 1/2 hours at this temperature but you will get gray, not pink, meat. It will still taste good, though.

Now you have an optional step: You can, if you choose, brown the venison in butter or oil. I chose not to because if you then simmer the venison at a low enough temperature, it will remain pink all the way through. If you brown the outside, you will get a gray ring around the edge of the venison when you cut into it. Either way is fine.

Pour the marinade into a pot and bring it to a boil. Pour it into a Dutch oven or other lidded pot and place the venison inside. Cover and put in the oven. If the venison is not submerged by the marinade, turn the roast over every hour. This is also a good way to test for doneness you want the roast to almost be falling apart. When the roast is done, take it out of the pot and coat it with some of the 1/4 cup olive oil or melted butter. Reserve the rest of the oil or butter for later. Wrap it in foil.

Now you make the sauerbraten sauce and sauerbraten is all about the sauce. Strain the cooking liquid through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl. Take the 8 ginger snap cookies and pulverize them in a blender. You want it to look like a rough meal or coarse flour.
In a medium-sized pot, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat. When it is frothing and totally melted, whisk in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook until it is the color of coffee-and-cream, stirring often. Slowly whisk in the cooking liquid, one cup at a time. The mixture will turn to clay at first, then loosen into a silky sauce. Taste for salt it will probably need it and add enough to your taste.

Whisk in 4 tablespoons of the pulverized ginger snaps. They will not dissolve completely at first, but keep stirring and they will disappear. Taste the sauce. Add another tablespoon of ginger snaps if you want, or add a tablespoon of sugar. The sauce should taste sour, warm (a pumpkin pie sort of spicy warm) and a little zippy and sweet.


Kartoffelmehlkloss (Potato Dumplings)
Ingredients:

  • 6 potatoes, unpeeled
  • 1 cup flour, sifted
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 Tbs Salt
  • 4 tsp butter, melted
  • tsp pepper
  • 1 Tbs onion, chopped
  • Croutons
  • cup dry breadcrumbs
Instructions:

Boil potatoes with skin on. Refrigerate until ready to use. Peel boiled potatoes and press through a potato ricer. Combine potato, flour, egg, onion and seasonings into a dough.

Roll dough into balls the size of a golf ball. Press down to flatten, insert 2 or 3 croutons into the center and roll the dough around croutons to form a ball.

Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil. Slowly lower dumplings into boiling salted water and boil for 8-10 minutes. Remove from water using a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels.

Combine butter and breadcrumbs and spread on plate. Roll dumplings in buttered breadcrumbs.
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Old 12-17-2011, 03:03 PM   #25
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There are as many sauerbraten recipes as there are German grandmothers. Same for rotkohl, which is a standard side dish for the meal. I have found that you use a lot less flour if the potatoes are baked instead of boiled, which makes for a better tasting dumpling. Same goes for gnocchi.

Craig
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:20 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Sauerbraten with potato dumplings:


Sauerbraten



Ingredients:
  • 3-4 pound roast of venison (or beef chuck)
  • 1 bottle of red wine
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 Tbsp black peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp juniper berries
  • 1 Tbsp mustard seed
  • 6-8 cloves
  • 3-5 bay leaves
  • 1 Tbsp dried thyme
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup melted butter or olive oil
  • 8 ginger snap cookies
  • 3 Tbsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp flour
  • Salt
Instructions:

Bring marinade ingredients -- wine, vinegar, water, peppercorns, juniper, mustard, cloves, bay leaves, thyme, celery, carrots and onion -- to a boil and turn off the heat. Allow to cool. Submerge the venison in the marinade and let it sit in the fridge for at least 24 hours, and up to 5 days. Three days is a good length of time. When you are ready to cook, take the roast out of the marinade and salt it well. Set it aside for 15-20 minutes or so.

Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Actually, 225 is a better temperature, but the roast can take up to 8 hours to properly cook then; this is what I do at home on weekends. At 275 degrees, the roast will probably take about 5 hours to cook. You can go up to 300 degrees a typical venison roast will be ready in 3 1/2 hours at this temperature but you will get gray, not pink, meat. It will still taste good, though.

Now you have an optional step: You can, if you choose, brown the venison in butter or oil. I chose not to because if you then simmer the venison at a low enough temperature, it will remain pink all the way through. If you brown the outside, you will get a gray ring around the edge of the venison when you cut into it. Either way is fine.

Pour the marinade into a pot and bring it to a boil. Pour it into a Dutch oven or other lidded pot and place the venison inside. Cover and put in the oven. If the venison is not submerged by the marinade, turn the roast over every hour. This is also a good way to test for doneness you want the roast to almost be falling apart. When the roast is done, take it out of the pot and coat it with some of the 1/4 cup olive oil or melted butter. Reserve the rest of the oil or butter for later. Wrap it in foil.

Now you make the sauerbraten sauce and sauerbraten is all about the sauce. Strain the cooking liquid through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl. Take the 8 ginger snap cookies and pulverize them in a blender. You want it to look like a rough meal or coarse flour.
In a medium-sized pot, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat. When it is frothing and totally melted, whisk in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook until it is the color of coffee-and-cream, stirring often. Slowly whisk in the cooking liquid, one cup at a time. The mixture will turn to clay at first, then loosen into a silky sauce. Taste for salt it will probably need it and add enough to your taste.

Whisk in 4 tablespoons of the pulverized ginger snaps. They will not dissolve completely at first, but keep stirring and they will disappear. Taste the sauce. Add another tablespoon of ginger snaps if you want, or add a tablespoon of sugar. The sauce should taste sour, warm (a pumpkin pie sort of spicy warm) and a little zippy and sweet.


Kartoffelmehlkloss (Potato Dumplings)

Ingredients:

  • 6 potatoes, unpeeled
  • 1 cup flour, sifted
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 Tbs Salt
  • 4 tsp butter, melted
  • tsp pepper
  • 1 Tbs onion, chopped
  • Croutons
  • cup dry breadcrumbs
Instructions:

Boil potatoes with skin on. Refrigerate until ready to use. Peel boiled potatoes and press through a potato ricer. Combine potato, flour, egg, onion and seasonings into a dough.

Roll dough into balls the size of a golf ball. Press down to flatten, insert 2 or 3 croutons into the center and roll the dough around croutons to form a ball.

Bring a large amount of salted water to a boil. Slowly lower dumplings into boiling salted water and boil for 8-10 minutes. Remove from water using a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels.

Combine butter and breadcrumbs and spread on plate. Roll dumplings in buttered breadcrumbs.
Wow, very elaborated recipe! Thank you a lot, added to my recipe list my friend :)
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:21 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
There are as many sauerbraten recipes as there are German grandmothers. Same for rotkohl, which is a standard side dish for the meal. I have found that you use a lot less flour if the potatoes are baked instead of boiled, which makes for a better tasting dumpling. Same goes for gnocchi.

Craig
Great tip, thank you Craig!
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