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Old 03-15-2006, 01:35 AM   #11
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Gotta be completely honest here. Not a lot of Australians eat kangaroo or emu. Some trendy restaurants catering mainly to tourists have these things, but the average Australian (which is not the average Aborigine) probably wouldn't touch the stuff. I've eaten it - but never again, thank you! The vast majority of our population does not eat our wildlife, though some 'wild' meats are now being farmed - buffalo, crocodile, kangaroo, emu, ostrich (not native) - though you can't usually find such things in the supermarket or your local butcher's shop. (You can get kangaroo meat, but it's sold as dog's meat - and a lot of dogs won't eat it either!) We go mostly for lamb, beef or pork, in that order of preference.

If you want fish, see if you can get some barramundi. It's considered a delicacy, but I think it's fairly ordinary, actually! Perhaps try some Tasmanian scallops. We don't have 'shrimp' here in Australia, either - they are prawns!

Although most families eat things like curries and stirfries and such, the majority of people still stick to the English-based recipes - a typical Australian dinner for visitors is still something like the old Roast Lamb and Vegetables - usually pumpkin, potato, and peas and/or beans. Served with Mint Sauce. At Christmas or special occasions, there's always turkey or ham - but seafood is increasingly popular. Cooking a roast dinner with all the trimmings, at the height of summer, doesn't bring much joy to the cook! So in recent years we've seen an increasing number of entertaining events to celebrate Christmas In July, where all the traditional Northern Hemisphere stuff is prepared.

For casual occasions, a meat pie is the go. Never, never eaten formally, never on a plate or with knife and fork!

You'll have to try for Pavlova and Peche Melba, if you're cooking an Australian dessert. Also, in Australia, cakes and brownies etc are not considered desserts. Such things are served for morning or afternoon teas. A cheesecake, however, serves both purposes. We aren't all that adventurous with our cheesecakes - it's nearly always lemon, but sometimes you'll see a chocolate one, or a plain one with some stiff, jam-like fruit sauce on top - usually strawberry or mango.
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Old 03-15-2006, 07:31 AM   #12
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Wow from what you have written there Daisy it makes me sound like a freak. Im a 17 year old girl who would normally freak at the idea of eating kangaroo but in year 10 we made a kangaroo stir-fry and i ate it! Also with the meat pie, you said never eaten formally or on a plate with a knife and fork. Yeah well again thats me. Not formally but i eat my pies with a knife and fork on a plate.

Wow there must be something wrong with me. Either that or im just one in like 17 million (probably more) who likes to do things abnormally (is that a word?)

Anyways thanks again for helping

Luv Kimmie
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Old 03-15-2006, 07:53 PM   #13
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oh my god kim your such a freak. Then again your my firend and everyone always says it takes one to know one so i guess im a freak too. I never ate the kangaroo like u cause im a vegetarian and i like kangaroos that hop around not lie still and open. I dont eat meat pies either but when i did i prefered to eat them from paper bags cause it is so much more fun.

luv Krysten
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Old 03-21-2006, 06:06 PM   #14
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Ok hi its me again (Kim)

Anyways im supposed to looking for recipes right now but i thought i would ask for advice first. To start with i want to make Japanese gyoza but i need to make it in some way Australian. I thought of using lamb in it and then some Australian native herbs or something but im not sure. Also Krysten has decided to make smoked cheese & mozarella balls and she would like some serving tips to suit australia.

If anyone can help with these it would be much appreciated.

Cya

Luv Kim
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Old 03-21-2006, 08:27 PM   #15
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as daisy said, much asian influence (what we call pacific rim here in USA) As I recall you are vegetarian, so any veggie roll or lettuce wrap from Vietnam would work using your fruits and veggies etc but their sauces spices etc.
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Old 03-22-2006, 04:16 PM   #16
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Hi it me (Krysten),

I am the vegetarian not kim and i was wondering if any one had any ideas on what kind of sauce i could serve with my smoked cheese and mozarella balls. They are balls of both cheeses mixed together (with a few other ingredients) deepfried in hot oil. My sister suggeted using sweet chilli sauce qand my mum suggested using white sauce. does anyone have any other ideas.

Bye Bye

Krysten
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:00 AM   #17
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Exclamation Help!

i have an assessment where i have to create a menu for a canteen at a football game. the thing is we have to get rid of all the fatty and sugary foods and replace them with healthy alternatives the only catch is we also have to add multicultural items. we have to add a minimum of five of them.

does anybody have any ideas on quick, easy to prepare multicultural foods?

Your help would be much appreciated
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Old 05-10-2009, 08:35 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheese-lovers View Post
Hi Its us again and weve got a new asasignment. This one is about the outside influences on Australian cuisine since world war 2 and we were wondering if anyone had any information about this. The practical for this assignment is to make a finger food for a cocktail party and present it appropriatley. The finger food is to from any culture other than our own that incorporates Australian foods and or cooking methods and any ideas would be greatley appreciated.

Luv Kim and Krysten
Hi Kim and Krysten,
And what work have the pair of you done in response to the assignment? What have you found out.

I susbscirbe to other food sites and on all of these, we get requests from students for us to do their work for them. The general consensus is that posters are not "here" to do the work of students who are too lazy to think or work things out for themselves. Yes, we will help but only once the poster has demonstrated that they have given some thought, which they are willing to share, to the assignment - are you another pair of lazy students?

What questions have you asked?

What was the main influence on the diet in Australia prior to WW2. Well, that would be the diet of the natives/immigrants (I guess, predominantly white and anglo-saxon) up to that point. What was the diet? Does the Australian Government have any food consumption statistics which you could access?

Influences on food derive from immigration. Have there been any major waves of immgration since WW2 - European eg., Greek and Italian or Pacific rim such as Korea or Vietnam? Did any immigration "waves" influence diet - first probably through the development of restaurants and fusion food which have filtered down to the domestic scene.

Other influences on food are social - household numbers change and affect food patterns. One person households where the individual works may differ significantly from one where there is a stay at home partner. Economics plays a role - you only have to see the posts on the BBC food messageboard to see how true this is! Technology - has this inflenced food in any way in Australia - is this different from the rest of the world? Etc., etc.

What are your thoughts?

All the best,
Archiduc
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:15 PM   #19
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There was an Australian couple who lived here for several years, and we became friends with them. Alice made Australian Shepherds pie for us, although she had to use beef because lamb is not available in our small town. It was very good.

They told all sorts of stories about Australia, including Alice's journey through the outback, where there was no decent water to wash her hair (back then).
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:18 PM   #20
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By the way, I would eat Kanga...I've eaten deer, wild rabbit, squirrel and lots of other unusual things, so why not?
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