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Old 06-29-2016, 11:04 AM   #11
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How does one SHRED a grilled prawn?
I guess when you work in the Thai king's palace kitchen, you end up doing some pretty tedious, fairly useless, jobs
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:15 AM   #12
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I guess when you work in the Thai king's palace kitchen, you end up doing some pretty tedious, fairly useless, jobs
The King liked delicate presentations, I guess ...

Actually, I looked up the recipe in David Thompson's quintessential Thai Food cookbook and the prawns are in large chunks. Less work!

I am going to make this soon!
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:47 PM   #13
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How does one SHRED a grilled prawn?
Same way you would shred pulled pork: with two forks. You could just cut it up, but best to have small, irregular shreds that the other ingredients can get cosy with.

I only paid $35 for my lime tree, from a gardening place in Seattle, but I'll wait until I have greenhouse-access before I get another one. Luckily, lemongrass is a local weed: very easy to grow and hardy enough for Seattle.

If you'd rather just use the Inernet, LemonCitrusTree.com ships 3 different sizes, and guarantees them. Their biggest is ~$100 delivered, but they "can't ship to Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii or Texas due to USDA regulations." (Because they could escape and grow there, but no doubt also because they don't want Kaffir pollen around their citrus crops.)
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:31 PM   #14
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If you'd rather just use the Inernet, LemonCitrusTree.com ships 3 different sizes, and guarantees them. Their biggest is ~$100 delivered, but they "can't ship to Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii or Texas due to USDA regulations." (Because they could escape and grow there, but no doubt also because they don't want Kaffir pollen around their citrus crops.)
That's funny as I live in south Florida and bought the kaffir and Australian finger lime locally. I'm sure they bought them wholesale. Most exotic citrus I believe has to be grafted onto lemon stock. I'm sure that is the case with Persian limes grow here.

The citrus industry here got their arses handed to them during the year we had 4 hurricanes hit the state. The then governor and legislature in 2002, created a citrus canker eradication program. They passed a law to eliminate all "infected" trees and those with in 1900' of those trees, commercial or private. It only applied to the counties from the Palm Beach county northern line over to the west coast and south to Key West in Monroe county. Problem was, they couldn't point out the infected trees with in that 1900' zone and just started cutting them all down. All citrus trees were banned from purchase. The hurricane season of 2004 spread canker all over the state. Canker blemished the skin with no detriment to the pulp. The major use of Florida's citrus is juice, something canker doesn't effect.
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:38 PM   #15
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Same way you would shred pulled pork: with two forks. You could just cut it up, but best to have small, irregular shreds that the other ingredients can get cosy with..)
Because shrimp firms up when you cook it, Im not envisioning a pulled pork sort of procedure, where the pork has broken down and can be pulled apart.

But DT book shows the prawns to be sliced or chunked -- good enough for me!



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Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
If you'd rather just use the Inernet, LemonCitrusTree.com ships 3 different sizes, and guarantees them. Their biggest is ~$100 delivered, but they "can't ship to Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii or Texas due to USDA regulations." (Because they could escape and grow there, but no doubt also because they don't want Kaffir pollen around their citrus crops.)
Thanks! Now I'm very intrigued ...

I've got a freezer full of beautiful leaves but a tree would be cool! Do they smell good?
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:26 PM   #16
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Oh, yes the limes have a wonderful aroma, but that just masks the bitterness that very tempting smell hides in the fruit!
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:38 PM   #17
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I guess when you work in the Thai king's palace kitchen, you end up doing some pretty tedious, fairly useless, jobs
Shredding shrimp? That ain't NUTTIN' compared to working the Korean president's kitchen, where your task for the morning might be beheading and de-gutting several thousand tiny dried anchovies (ikan bilis) for Korean dashi. I don't see the point of beheading, because there's plenty good flavour in the head, but de-gutting is mandatory for clean-tasting dashi. If you're not a purist, adding some ikan bilis to katsuobushi/kombu dashi gives a nice extra complexity.



(I like to stick to topic, but can't resist this quick aside: My dad was a "guest" of the Japanese in Singapore during WWII. He would summon our Siamese cat to dinner with "Ikan bilis! Ikan bilis!" He told us (fairly accurately) that it was Siamese for "little white fish", and it amazed us kids that the cat immediately understood what he meant...)
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:10 PM   #18
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Yeah I've made that a few times .... It's not that horrible because the anchovies are really strong and go a long way with the kelp which is pretty easy.

I'm not cleaning that basket, though!!!
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Old 06-29-2016, 08:31 PM   #19
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I'm wondering if you could sub Worcestershire sauce for the fish sauce. Isn't that what Worcestershire sauce is supposed to be - sort of?
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:36 PM   #20
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I'm wondering if you could sub Worcestershire sauce for the fish sauce. Isn't that what Worcestershire sauce is supposed to be - sort of?
Have you had fish sauce? It's very different from Worcestershire sauce. Worcestershire is thicker, darker and has a more meaty flavor. You could use it, but it would be different.
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chilies, cilantro, fish sauce, grill, grilled shrimp, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, mint, recipe, shallots, young ginger

Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns [B][CENTER]Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns (Thai)[/CENTER][/B] This is the most surprising, delicious thing I've ever eaten. The recipe source is David Thompson, but as written, it is very difficult to source, even in 2016. I'll expand the instructions a little, and suggest easier-to-source ingredients that make a close (and delicious) version accessible to anyone. Thompson describes it as a perfect example of Thai Palace Cuisine: exquisitely prepared tiny plates. (Just an aside, but humans have been writing recipes for thousands of years. Is it still really necessary to write "Ingredients" before listing the ingredients? And then "Instructions" before giving the instructions? Is that not a bit like writing "Wall" on every wall?) 1 tbs lime juice 1 tbs mandarin juice A little Kaffir lime juice A little palm sugar 1 tbs fish sauce 2 scuds (hellishly hot green chillies) 2 large Yamba prawns, grilled in their shells, then peeled and shredded 2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only, VERY finely chopped. 2 tbs ginger julienne 1 green or red chilli, julienned 2 red shallots, sliced Mint and Coriander leaves Make the sauce by pounding the scuds in a mortar then mixing in the other sauce ingredients. The taste should be hot, sour and salty. Combine all ingredients. It is important to chop everything small enough so that every mouthful contains everything. Here's David Thompson again: "If you’ve ever tried to eat even very fine slices of raw lemongrass or ginger, it doesn’t seem like this would work at all. For some reason, when all the ingredients are combined, they become perfectly edible, their texture and flavor balancing out the dressed shrimps perfectly. The amount of shredding and the uncommon ingredients in this recipe suggest that it was originally royal food.” So here's how to make it accessible: Kaffir lime juice? It tastes utterly bizarre, and you basically need your own Kaffir lime tree to get some. So of course I got my own Kaffir lime tree. The juice is incredibly soapy, and its main use is indeed as a shampoo. This is the only recipe I've ever seen it in. The rind is thick and lumpy, impossible to replicate, but you can get fairly close using lime and Meyer lemon juice and zest. Palm sugar? Light brown sugar. Fish sauce? You need a really good one like [URL="http://www.amazon.com/review/R3ML1RYU9BAA7T"]Red Boat[/URL] for this dish, but in the meantime try it with any fish sauce. Utterly key is grilling the shrimp in their shells, and if you throw those crispy shells away after peeling them, you are not a serious cook. There's far to much chest-pounding about how HOT Thai dishes should be, but this one really needs to push your envelope. Scuds? I'm guessing Thai bird chilies. As written, it's insanely hot, but if you de-seed the chilies and remove all the white pith, you might only need one or two [URL="https://hywelsbiglog.wordpress.com/2008/05/08/beer-review-singha-lager-beer/"]Singha[/URL] chasers. 3 stars 1 reviews
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