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Old 06-29-2016, 10:01 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I'm wondering if you could sub Worcestershire sauce for the fish sauce. Isn't that what Worcestershire sauce is supposed to be - sort of?
Not a chance. Worcestershire ("Wooster") sauce is indeed Asian, but it's a sauce with its own real flavours. Fish sauce is an MSG-heavy condiment, like greatly-amplified salt. I use it in everything, including ice cream, with no complaints.

Take a deep breath, and embrace that funk!

Addendum: I've actually made fish sauce, without realizing it. I did fisheries research on the Hudson River for the NRC, monitoring the effect that the Indian Point nuclear power station was having on fish. It was the greatest job in the world, swanning around in fishing boats all day, except that we also had to count every last fish that the water-intake screens killed.

In the summer heat, they piled up several feet high on the sorting tables. If we didn't get to them quick enough, a disgusting thick brown stinky fluid would exude from them. We called it "mung" and tried to keep it off our clothes. That's a fair description of fish sauce. (Oh? Did I put you off?)
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Old 06-30-2016, 07:24 AM   #22
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Worcestershire sauce, originated in India. L&P was the result of an attempt to recreate it in England, commissioned by a retired Bengal governer. The name was taken from his home town in England. Personally I prefer homemade, using a recipe from Emeril.
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Old 06-30-2016, 07:56 AM   #23
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I'm wondering if you could sub Worcestershire sauce for the fish sauce. Isn't that what Worcestershire sauce is supposed to be - sort of?
No. They don't taste similar at all.

Worcestershire sauce has anchovies and a bunch of other stuff in it. Fish sauce is fermented fish and salt.

Using Worcestershire sauce as a sub would be a horrible mistake. Plus you can buy fish sauce in regular grocery stores these days.
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Old 07-02-2016, 08:00 PM   #24
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I've looked for fish sauce before and could never find it. That's why I asked about Worcestershire sauce. And isn't there an anchovy sauce as well?

Another item to check for in Trader Joe's.
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Old 07-02-2016, 09:08 PM   #25
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I've looked for fish sauce before and could never find it. That's why I asked about Worcestershire sauce. And isn't there an anchovy sauce as well?
It's not hard to find these days, even in standard supermarkets. Most have "Taste of Thai" brand (which I don't recommend as a brand, but if you think for a second about what fish sauce IS, it's hard to imagine making a "bad" one: how exactly would it differ? :-)

An anchovy sauce? There's a whole universe of fish sauces out there, starting with the Ancient Roman garum made from fish guts and blood. It survives today as the Italian Colatura di Alici, which is made from whole anchovies and may be the one you have in mind (either that, or the one called Anchovy Essence.) Worcestershire is mostly made from anchovies.

There are about fifty different Asian styles, but of standard styles, Red Boat 40N from Pho Quoc in Vietnam is considered the pinnacle. To spot any good brand, look for one that contains only fish and salt as ingredients.

Once you embrace the funk, you can explore its outer limits, which would be Padaek from Laos/Issan, a muddy-brown thick liquid with large lumps of fermented gourami-fish in it. I've bred gourami: they're wonderful fish. I've been staring at a bottle of the dang stuff for years now, and am still not tempted to open it.
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chilies, cilantro, fish sauce, grill, grilled shrimp, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, mint, recipe, shallots, young ginger

Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns [B][CENTER]Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns (Thai)[/CENTER][/B] This is the most surprising, delicious thing I've ever eaten. The recipe source is David Thompson, but as written, it is very difficult to source, even in 2016. I'll expand the instructions a little, and suggest easier-to-source ingredients that make a close (and delicious) version accessible to anyone. Thompson describes it as a perfect example of Thai Palace Cuisine: exquisitely prepared tiny plates. (Just an aside, but humans have been writing recipes for thousands of years. Is it still really necessary to write "Ingredients" before listing the ingredients? And then "Instructions" before giving the instructions? Is that not a bit like writing "Wall" on every wall?) 1 tbs lime juice 1 tbs mandarin juice A little Kaffir lime juice A little palm sugar 1 tbs fish sauce 2 scuds (hellishly hot green chillies) 2 large Yamba prawns, grilled in their shells, then peeled and shredded 2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only, VERY finely chopped. 2 tbs ginger julienne 1 green or red chilli, julienned 2 red shallots, sliced Mint and Coriander leaves Make the sauce by pounding the scuds in a mortar then mixing in the other sauce ingredients. The taste should be hot, sour and salty. Combine all ingredients. It is important to chop everything small enough so that every mouthful contains everything. Here's David Thompson again: "If you’ve ever tried to eat even very fine slices of raw lemongrass or ginger, it doesn’t seem like this would work at all. For some reason, when all the ingredients are combined, they become perfectly edible, their texture and flavor balancing out the dressed shrimps perfectly. The amount of shredding and the uncommon ingredients in this recipe suggest that it was originally royal food.” So here's how to make it accessible: Kaffir lime juice? It tastes utterly bizarre, and you basically need your own Kaffir lime tree to get some. So of course I got my own Kaffir lime tree. The juice is incredibly soapy, and its main use is indeed as a shampoo. This is the only recipe I've ever seen it in. The rind is thick and lumpy, impossible to replicate, but you can get fairly close using lime and Meyer lemon juice and zest. Palm sugar? Light brown sugar. Fish sauce? You need a really good one like [URL="http://www.amazon.com/review/R3ML1RYU9BAA7T"]Red Boat[/URL] for this dish, but in the meantime try it with any fish sauce. Utterly key is grilling the shrimp in their shells, and if you throw those crispy shells away after peeling them, you are not a serious cook. There's far to much chest-pounding about how HOT Thai dishes should be, but this one really needs to push your envelope. Scuds? I'm guessing Thai bird chilies. As written, it's insanely hot, but if you de-seed the chilies and remove all the white pith, you might only need one or two [URL="https://hywelsbiglog.wordpress.com/2008/05/08/beer-review-singha-lager-beer/"]Singha[/URL] chasers. 3 stars 1 reviews
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