"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Appetizers & Hors D'oeuvres
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-28-2016, 07:08 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns

Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns (Thai)


This is the most surprising, delicious thing I've ever eaten. The recipe source is David Thompson, but as written, it is very difficult to source, even in 2016. I'll expand the instructions a little, and suggest easier-to-source ingredients that make a close (and delicious) version accessible to anyone.

Thompson describes it as a perfect example of Thai Palace Cuisine: exquisitely prepared tiny plates.

(Just an aside, but humans have been writing recipes for thousands of years. Is it still really necessary to write "Ingredients" before listing the ingredients? And then "Instructions" before giving the instructions? Is that not a bit like writing "Wall" on every wall?)

1 tbs lime juice
1 tbs mandarin juice
A little Kaffir lime juice
A little palm sugar
1 tbs fish sauce
2 scuds (hellishly hot green chillies)
2 large Yamba prawns, grilled in their shells, then peeled and shredded
2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only, VERY finely chopped.
2 tbs ginger julienne
1 green or red chilli, julienned
2 red shallots, sliced
Mint and Coriander leaves

Make the sauce by pounding the scuds in a mortar then mixing in the other sauce ingredients. The taste should be hot, sour and salty. Combine all ingredients.

It is important to chop everything small enough so that every mouthful contains everything. Here's David Thompson again:

"If you’ve ever tried to eat even very fine slices of raw lemongrass or ginger, it doesn’t seem like this would work at all. For some reason, when all the ingredients are combined, they become perfectly edible, their texture and flavor balancing out the dressed shrimps perfectly. The amount of shredding and the uncommon ingredients in this recipe suggest that it was originally royal food.”

So here's how to make it accessible: Kaffir lime juice? It tastes utterly bizarre, and you basically need your own Kaffir lime tree to get some. So of course I got my own Kaffir lime tree. The juice is incredibly soapy, and its main use is indeed as a shampoo. This is the only recipe I've ever seen it in. The rind is thick and lumpy, impossible to replicate, but you can get fairly close using lime and Meyer lemon juice and zest.

Palm sugar? Light brown sugar. Fish sauce? You need a really good one like Red Boat for this dish, but in the meantime try it with any fish sauce.

Utterly key is grilling the shrimp in their shells, and if you throw those crispy shells away after peeling them, you are not a serious cook.

There's far to much chest-pounding about how HOT Thai dishes should be, but this one really needs to push your envelope. Scuds? I'm guessing Thai bird chilies. As written, it's insanely hot, but if you de-seed the chilies and remove all the white pith, you might only need one or two Singha chasers.

__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 07:27 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
You've actually made this with Kaffir lime juice and you grow them in Seattle? Got pictures?
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 08:15 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
I've got pictures, but need to find them. They show a healthy 5' tree in the springtime, literally bustin' out all over. It's a gorgeous plant. Unfortunately, it doesn't really work in Seattle, unless you have a greenhouse. It survived three winters indoors, literally dropping all its leaves (yum!) each time, but last winter the temperature got down to 31 F overnight before I brought it indoors, and that was that.
__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 09:02 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
You mean something like these?



__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 09:19 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
That looks like one of the few Kaffir limes I ever got from the dang thing. I'm not remotely a green-thumb, and it amazed me that it got fertilized in Seattle. If you can guarantee no freezing temperatures ever, it's a very purty plant, and friends line up for care packages.
__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2016, 09:32 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
If I walk out the side door, there is a kaffir lime tree, an Australian finger lime tree, galangal and lemon grass within 15' of each other. Your recipe is the first I have ever seen that uses the extremely bitter juice of the kaffir. I have inquired about using the juice but never got an answer.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2016, 05:41 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
That looks like one of the few Kaffir limes I ever got from the dang thing. I'm not remotely a green-thumb, and it amazed me that it got fertilized in Seattle. If you can guarantee no freezing temperatures ever, it's a very purty plant, and friends line up for care packages.
Most citrus are self-pollinating. If they don't bud and form fruit after getting established, they may need an extra dose of magnesium, which is easily accomplished by epsom salts. Our finger lime and the Kaffir were having a bit of trouble getting down to business so I did some reading, started giving them a dose of epsom salts regularly and now they bloom like crazy and we have lots and lots of fruit. I think the finger lime is much prettier than the kaffir personally. Tiny dense leaves, small compact tree, only it has a surprise for the unwary - THORNS! Got to protect those lovely little finger limes.
__________________
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2016, 08:31 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
If I walk out the side door, there is a kaffir lime tree, an Australian finger lime tree, galangal and lemon grass within 15' of each other. Your recipe is the first I have ever seen that uses the extremely bitter juice of the kaffir. I have inquired about using the juice but never got an answer.
I am envious!! I usually grow lemongrass, though not this year and would love to have those trees!

I've never seen a recipe (until now) that calls for using kaffir lime juice. It's soapy? Hmmmmm......
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2016, 10:37 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,117
[QUOTE=jennyema;1471287]I am envious!! I usually grow lemongrass, though not this year and would love to have those trees!

I've never seen a recipe (until now) that calls for using kaffir lime juice. It's soapy? Hmmmmm......[/QUOTE]

Oh, I forgot to mention that. Not soapy to me, just bitter, bitter, bitter.
__________________
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2016, 10:58 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
How does one SHRED a grilled prawn?
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chilies, cilantro, fish sauce, grill, grilled shrimp, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, mint, recipe, shallots, young ginger

Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns [B][CENTER]Saeng Wa of Grilled Prawns (Thai)[/CENTER][/B] This is the most surprising, delicious thing I've ever eaten. The recipe source is David Thompson, but as written, it is very difficult to source, even in 2016. I'll expand the instructions a little, and suggest easier-to-source ingredients that make a close (and delicious) version accessible to anyone. Thompson describes it as a perfect example of Thai Palace Cuisine: exquisitely prepared tiny plates. (Just an aside, but humans have been writing recipes for thousands of years. Is it still really necessary to write "Ingredients" before listing the ingredients? And then "Instructions" before giving the instructions? Is that not a bit like writing "Wall" on every wall?) 1 tbs lime juice 1 tbs mandarin juice A little Kaffir lime juice A little palm sugar 1 tbs fish sauce 2 scuds (hellishly hot green chillies) 2 large Yamba prawns, grilled in their shells, then peeled and shredded 2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only, VERY finely chopped. 2 tbs ginger julienne 1 green or red chilli, julienned 2 red shallots, sliced Mint and Coriander leaves Make the sauce by pounding the scuds in a mortar then mixing in the other sauce ingredients. The taste should be hot, sour and salty. Combine all ingredients. It is important to chop everything small enough so that every mouthful contains everything. Here's David Thompson again: "If you’ve ever tried to eat even very fine slices of raw lemongrass or ginger, it doesn’t seem like this would work at all. For some reason, when all the ingredients are combined, they become perfectly edible, their texture and flavor balancing out the dressed shrimps perfectly. The amount of shredding and the uncommon ingredients in this recipe suggest that it was originally royal food.” So here's how to make it accessible: Kaffir lime juice? It tastes utterly bizarre, and you basically need your own Kaffir lime tree to get some. So of course I got my own Kaffir lime tree. The juice is incredibly soapy, and its main use is indeed as a shampoo. This is the only recipe I've ever seen it in. The rind is thick and lumpy, impossible to replicate, but you can get fairly close using lime and Meyer lemon juice and zest. Palm sugar? Light brown sugar. Fish sauce? You need a really good one like [URL="http://www.amazon.com/review/R3ML1RYU9BAA7T"]Red Boat[/URL] for this dish, but in the meantime try it with any fish sauce. Utterly key is grilling the shrimp in their shells, and if you throw those crispy shells away after peeling them, you are not a serious cook. There's far to much chest-pounding about how HOT Thai dishes should be, but this one really needs to push your envelope. Scuds? I'm guessing Thai bird chilies. As written, it's insanely hot, but if you de-seed the chilies and remove all the white pith, you might only need one or two [URL="https://hywelsbiglog.wordpress.com/2008/05/08/beer-review-singha-lager-beer/"]Singha[/URL] chasers. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.