"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Appetizers & Hors D'oeuvres
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-21-2018, 03:32 AM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
Ways to keep hard boiled egg white EVEN

Many times when I hard boil eggs, and AFTER I peel them , then slice in half, (for deviled eggs), the WHITES are very often super thin ON ONE END . When I say thin , I mean as thin as a sheet of paper, or even thinner. I'd like to have a nice even thickness for the egg WHITES all around it.

Does anyone have any ideas how I can avoid this ?

thank you.

__________________

Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 04:06 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 13,027
I knew there had to be a way - in fact, I kinda remember this question here at DC once upon a time but can't find it. However, Google did come up with a few hits. This one has the most amusing conversation - and, quite possibly, a solution. I say go for the square egg.

Centering an Egg Yolk

As for me, I don't care whether it's centered or not. I just care if the yolk filling is yummy.
__________________

__________________
“How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?”— Charles de Gaulle

"Remember, all that matters in the end is getting the meal on the table." ~ Julia Child
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 06:20 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,524
I've heard of several solutions but cannot remember a one!

I can, however, tell you why it happens. Not scientific though I'm sure there is one.

The egg in all probability is aged. The chalazae, white strands which hold the yolk centred, is losing its integrity, allowing the yolk to move around.

Solution is to use fresher eggs but that in itself can lead to the problem of not being able to peel the egg smoothly.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 07:54 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,858
I don't really worry about the position of the yolk. I'm more concerned that the egg is cooked properly and peels easily. This method from Serious Eats by Kenji Lopez-Alt works very well. The only thing I changed is to cook for a minute longer because I live at 4200 feet elevation, and water here boils at about 206°, not 212°.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 12:57 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 21,764
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I don't really care if the yolks are perfectly centred. But, like Traveler, I don't want the sides excessively thin. Sometimes the sides are so thin that they break when you try to put the devilled yolk back in the white.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 01:10 PM   #6
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
I'm not worried about peeling the egg easily, because I have an almost magical method. When the eggs are ready, I immediately put them in a bath of ice water , with many ice cubes. That , somehow, separates the shell from the egg. That makes it super easy to remove the shell.

But I do very much want to have a yolk that is evenly , or almost so, nearly centered. It makes for a more attractive look for my guests AND then I would not have an "end" that is so thin it is missing. UGLY ! YUCK !

As I said above, many years ago, I read a article on how to avoid this problem. I just can't recall what that method was.
Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 01:13 PM   #7
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
i don't really care if the yolks are perfectly centred. But, like traveler, i don't want the sides excessively thin. Sometimes the sides are so thin that they break when you try to put the devilled yolk back in the white.

exactly !
Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 01:24 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 13,027
Why not just cook one or two eggs more than you'll need, say 12 eggs when you need 10. If the whites are perfect on the first ten eggs, save the last two for a snack, salad, or such. If you have a thin-walled egg, you'll have two back-up eggs. Just put a bit of yolk in the rejected white, eat it, and call it the cook's sample. Problem solved.
__________________
“How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?”— Charles de Gaulle

"Remember, all that matters in the end is getting the meal on the table." ~ Julia Child
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 01:26 PM   #9
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
[QUOTE=Cooking Goddess;1572132]I knew there had to be a way - in fact, I kinda remember this question here at DC once upon a time but can't find it. Ho

Centering an Egg Yolk

Cooking Goddess, I'll certainly try the method in you posted web site. (turning eggs upside down and hold in the fridge for a day or so.)
Thank you
Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 02:26 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 13,087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Why not just cook one or two eggs more than you'll need, say 12 eggs when you need 10. If the whites are perfect on the first ten eggs, save the last two for a snack, salad, or such. If you have a thin-walled egg, you'll have two back-up eggs. Just put a bit of yolk in the rejected white, eat it, and call it the cook's sample. Problem solved.
I think this is a very practical solution.
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 02:29 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 21,764
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Why not just cook one or two eggs more than you'll need, say 12 eggs when you need 10. If the whites are perfect on the first ten eggs, save the last two for a snack, salad, or such. If you have a thin-walled egg, you'll have two back-up eggs. Just put a bit of yolk in the rejected white, eat it, and call it the cook's sample. Problem solved.
Except the thin walled ones usually come in batches of more than two out of a dozen.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 02:40 PM   #12
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Except the thin walled ones usually come in batches of more than two out of a dozen.
Yes, indeed. The eggs I buy usually have 6 or 7 eggs out of a dozen, that have super thin walls on one end. Some have no wall at all.
Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 04:03 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,425
Wow, I've never had this happened. As the matter of fact this is the first time I hear about this. Am I just lucky?

I cook at the very least 3-4 dozen of eggs every week.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 09:13 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Rochester WA
Posts: 37
I have steamed my eggs for years (20 minutes) makes for easy peeling. Now I use my Instant Pot (4 minutes). Both methods - immediately put eggs in a bowl of ice water.
iamvics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 09:47 PM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Tijuana
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Wow, I've never had this happened. As the matter of fact this is the first time I hear about this. Am I just lucky?

I cook at the very least 3-4 dozen of eggs every week.

Since I live in Mexico, my eggs MAY be older than what you buy. The next time I run into San Diego I'll buy a dozen eggs and hard boil them to see if that helps.
Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 09:50 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 3,667
I seem to remember reading years ago, that if one gently “rolls” the eggs with a spoon, it centers the yolks.
__________________
Dance like no one’s watching, sing like no one’s listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2018, 10:37 PM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 45,821
Another "solution": Turn the egg carton on its side overnight before boiling and the yolks will be centered. Not sure if it works.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2018, 07:23 AM   #18
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,524
A lot of those methods work but, unfortunately in this day and age with automation in the hen houses, one may have to use more than one method to get results.
Eggs seem to be no longer consistent in shape and machines or people cannot quickly identify the correct end for packaging. Ideally the fat rounded end of an egg (where the air pocket is) should be up. Pointed end down. This helps to keep the yolk centered.

Again, not a solution to your specific question.

Another trick may be to sure to cut the egg in half with the thin side completely on the top or bottom. This thinness is not seen when presented as it becomes the bottom.
Or if cut with thinness on the side and it tears, I've always found that the yolk mixture is gooey enough to glue and hold the tear. Any really bad/ugly results are a bonus for cook's sampler - as previously stated by CG.

In my experience, if the eggs are good enough, they rarely last long enough for the consumer to examine or critique. Flaws are usually only seen by the creator - don't be too hard on yourself.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2018, 10:08 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 21,764
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
A lot of those methods work but, unfortunately in this day and age with automation in the hen houses, one may have to use more than one method to get results.
Eggs seem to be no longer consistent in shape and machines or people cannot quickly identify the correct end for packaging. Ideally the fat rounded end of an egg (where the air pocket is) should be up. Pointed end down. This helps to keep the yolk centered.

Again, not a solution to your specific question.

Another trick may be to sure to cut the egg in half with the thin side completely on the top or bottom. This thinness is not seen when presented as it becomes the bottom.
Or if cut with thinness on the side and it tears, I've always found that the yolk mixture is gooey enough to glue and hold the tear. Any really bad/ugly results are a bonus for cook's sampler - as previously stated by CG.

In my experience, if the eggs are good enough, they rarely last long enough for the consumer to examine or critique. Flaws are usually only seen by the creator - don't be too hard on yourself.
But, the tears make extra work and sometimes mess. Sometimes they are hard to pick up without making a mess. It's not a big deal, but it's nicer when it doesn't happen. TBH, I never pay attention to centred or not if it isn't so close to the edge that it might tear. Sometimes it even tears while peeling. I find that the off centre problem is almost always towards the side, not top or bottom.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2018, 06:42 AM   #20
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,524
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I find that the off centre problem is almost always towards the side, not top or bottom.


LOL
__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
egg, eggs, oil

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×