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Old 04-05-2006, 08:51 PM   #41
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Hi Velochic who knew you visit the midwest :-). The restaurant is called Saabri Phone Number - (773) 465-3272. It's a Pakistani joint and food is spicy but really good. The best thing are the "Sheek Kababs" and a red chicken that is called "Chicken Boti". They make a good biryani and chicken kadahi along with fresh naans.

Since you are well versed in Indian food, try their lassi and falooda to alongside the spicy food. Both are great.

Since I cook this food at home and my uncle is a one of the better Indian chefts, not in Chicago but has worked at many popular Indian restaurants in US, it takes a bit more to please me. I however like Saabri since it's really authentic (not watered down for the western palate).
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Old 04-06-2006, 06:32 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
rdg, i've had grilled fresh anchovies, drizzled with truffle oil and whole parsley stems. they were fantastic!

the meat flaked off the bone, and the truffles and parsley complimented it perfectly.
Bucky, I never tried with GRILLED anchovies....Only...How is it possible to grill them? They are too small! When we eat fried anchovies, we eat the whole fish, head and bones: it's impossible to do in another way. Is it possible that you use the fishes we call "sarde"? They are similar to sardines, but bigger. And sardines are bigger than anchovies. The type is nearly the same, but the meat is fatter.
As alternative, in Liguria (Genova) there is another recipe with anchovies, raw anchovies. Open and clean them in fillets, cover with lemon juice and evoo, and leave them for about a day. Before eating, add some parsley.
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Old 04-06-2006, 07:33 AM   #43
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Boy I can't think of any that stand out in my mind. I know I've eaten many wonderful ones too but I'm drawing a blank....sorry!
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Old 04-06-2006, 07:55 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
They make a good biryani and chicken kadahi along with fresh naans.
Thanks for the tip. I will write down Saabri's info in my notebook of important things (which goes everywhere with me). What kind of biryani do they specialize in? I know there are many varieties, but I don't know enough to understand the specifics. Is there something I should keep in mind?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
Since you are well versed in Indian food, try their lassi and falooda to alongside the spicy food. Both are great.
I however like Saabri since it's really authentic (not watered down for the western palate).
If it's not watered down, then a good lassi will be welcome and necessary! :) There is an Indian restaurant in Rosenheimer Platz in Munich that is very good, but it took several trips before they really believed me when I said that I wanted my food HOT. Spicy, spicy, spicy. They kept saying, spicy does not mean hot. Yes... I want it SPICY HOT. Ultimately, what worked best with these guys was the same system my favorite Indian restaurant in the US uses (India Garden in Indianapolis, IN)... a scale of 1 to 10... YES... I want an 8!!!!!!
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Old 04-06-2006, 08:00 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
Is it possible that you use the fishes we call "sarde"? They are similar to sardines, but bigger. And sardines are bigger than anchovies. The type is nearly the same, but the meat is fatter.
I think I know the fish you are talking about. In Turkey (where my husband is from), they call them "dumb" fish because you don't even have to put bait on the line to catch them. We bread and fry them and eat them whole. Their bones are so tender, you can eat them too. As you said, bigger and meatier than the anchovies or sardines, but still small. Does this sound familiar?
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Old 04-06-2006, 09:13 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
I think I know the fish you are talking about. In Turkey (where my husband is from), they call them "dumb" fish because you don't even have to put bait on the line to catch them. We bread and fry them and eat them whole. Their bones are so tender, you can eat them too. As you said, bigger and meatier than the anchovies or sardines, but still small. Does this sound familiar?
I effectively don't know. The description may be correct. Only, it's not possible to wholly eat sarde : bones are too hard. The fish is about.....40 gr? May be to 60. Very good fried or grilled, typical of mediterranean sea. When I was young, we was fishing them , and we cooked on a slate on the burning coals in the night, only wet with sea water. The meat was fat enough....
My God!!! What I remember! How deep blue were her eyes.....Do you think is it for this reason I like this dish so much? ( I'm not speaking of FISH eye, if it's necessary to explain.... )
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Old 04-07-2006, 01:37 PM   #47
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Ham and Cheese Crepes - Best Appetizer Ever!

Though I admit I am partial (family recipe), this has got to be the all time best appetizer. Don't let the amount of effort scare you, it's well worth it in the end. Increase the amounts for a main course dish. I GUARANTEE you everyone will love it!

http://www.applesaucecafe.com/Recipe...=1&RecipeId=45
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Old 04-07-2006, 01:52 PM   #48
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rdg, oops, thank you, you caught my mistake. i incorrectly said anchovies when i meant fresh sardines. they were pretty big and meaty for sardines, so they may have truely been the sarde that you've mentioned.
the sarde/sardines were cleaned, skewered, rubbed with evoo and sea salt, and grilled whole, then drizzled with truffle oil, and a little more truffle shavings. you ate them off the skewers along with whole stems of parsley, in a rustic kind of way.
(it was in an artsy/ecclectic restaurant in nyc years ago. )
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Old 04-14-2006, 05:46 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cristal
Hmm...I don't know about the best, but I'm addicted to the satays from Wild Ginger in Seattle. They have like I think 7 or 8 different kinds and you can sit at a satay bar and watch them make it for you.
hello to a fellow seattleite (sp?) i love wild ginger too! they post some recipes on their website http://www.wildginger.net/pdfs/LAMB_recipe.pdf
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Old 04-30-2006, 11:51 PM   #50
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Bang Bang Shrimp

It's out of this world, had it at Bone Fish Grill.
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