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Old 09-25-2008, 08:32 AM   #1
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AAB's Kickin Wing Sauce

Ask-A-Butcher’s “Kickin Wing Sauce”*


1- Red Bell pepper, halved and seeded
1- Cubanelle pepper, halved and seeded
2- Jalapeno peppers, halved and seeded*
2- Habanero peppers, halved and seeded*
5- Garlic cloves, peeled
½ large onion
*seeding is optional, depending on the heat you are looking for and by all means, please use the peppers of your choice.

¾ pound of butter or margarine (NOT ‘light’)
3- 12 oz bottles of your favorite hot sauce (I like Franks© Original)
1½ TBS ground black pepper
1 TBS ground cumin
1 TBS smoked paprika
1 TBS horseradish (not the ‘sauce’)
1½ TBS lime juice
¼ cup honey
¼ cup tequila (cheap is fine)
V-8 Juice©: OPTIONAL**

Set your grill up for indirect cooking, 200-225°, with some hickory chunks or chips for added flavor. Place the first six ingredients on the indirect side and smoke for a couple of hours (tip: put the garlic cloves inside the pepper halves to keep them from falling through the grill grates).

Remove vegetables from the grill, let cool, roughly chop into 1-2” chunks. In a blender pour one bottle of the hot sauce, add the vegetables, cover and blend until contents are liquefied.

In a medium to large sauce pan add the other two bottles of hot sauce and the butter or margarine. Heat on medium until the butter/margarine has melted completely. Whisk, or stir, in the pepper, cumin and smoked paprika.

Simmer for about half an hour, stirring every now and then to prevent sticking and clumping. Add the horseradish, lime juice, honey and tequila. Stir and put heat to low. Cook for another half an hour.

**if the sauce needs thinning, add V-8© to desired consistency.

Refrigerate covered sauce for four hours, over night is better. Remove from refrigerator and skim off any fat that has solidified and discard it.

Reheat sauce at medium-low heat. This makes enough sauce for about 4-5 dozen wings.

*winner of a non-sanctioned Chicken Wing Sauce contest held in Atlanta, GA on September 19, 2008

I'm not saying it's 'HOT' or any thing......but

In the blender to liquefy


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Old 09-25-2008, 09:05 AM   #2
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LOL - I have the same blender.

Thanks for the recipe.
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Old 09-25-2008, 10:46 AM   #3
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Looks terrific, but one question: Are you sure you mean "Cubanelle" peppers - the pale green thin-skinned Italian frying variety? Because all the Cubanelles I've ever grown are sweet as can be, so while I always seed them, it's not because there's any heat in them whatsoever. Perhaps you meant Anaheims, which do have a bit of heat to them? Both peppers are shaped fairly similar, except Cubanelles are somewhat larger & are a much paler shade of green than the Anaheims.
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Old 09-25-2008, 11:26 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Looks terrific, but one question: Are you sure you mean "Cubanelle" peppers - the pale green thin-skinned Italian frying variety? Because all the Cubanelles I've ever grown are sweet as can be, so while I always seed them, it's not because there's any heat in them whatsoever. Perhaps you meant Anaheims, which do have a bit of heat to them? Both peppers are shaped fairly similar, except Cubanelles are somewhat larger & are a much paler shade of green than the Anaheims.
They were listed as Cubanelles at the store, but I got them more for flavor than the heat.

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Old 09-25-2008, 11:39 AM   #5
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Have you tasted them before including them in your sauce mix? I only ask because Cubanelles are even milder than bell peppers. If what you used really were Cubanelles, their flavor was definitely gone with the wind mixed in with the other peppers. They're really best used on their own, otherwise their mild flavor is completely lost - even if you roast them.

My favorite ways to use them are sauteed & mixed in with scrambled eggs, & sauteed with sweet onions & tomatoes to mix in with sausages for Italian "sausages & peppers" or to top Italian sausage sub sandwiches.

Those do look like Cubanelles in your pic. I certainly don't want to mess with a recipe that you really like, but suggest that you might be better served with another stronger-flavored pepper like an Anaheim or even more Bells than the Cubanelles for something like a Wing Sauce. All they're providing is sweet bulk at a likely higher price.

But again - I'm definitely not trying to rain on your parade. I just noticed your asterisk next to the Cubanelles that they should be seeded if one didn't want additional heat. Cubanelles simply don't have any heat to give, seeded or not.
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Old 09-25-2008, 11:45 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Have you tasted them before including them in your sauce mix? I only ask because Cubanelles are even milder than bell peppers. If what you used really were Cubanelles, their flavor was definitely gone with the wind mixed in with the other peppers. They're really best used on their own, otherwise their mild flavor is completely lost - even if you roast them.

My favorite ways to use them are sauteed & mixed in with scrambled eggs, & sauteed with sweet onions & tomatoes to mix in with sausages for Italian "sausages & peppers" or to top Italian sausage sub sandwiches.

Those do look like Cubanelles in your pic. I certainly don't want to mess with a recipe that you really like, but suggest that you might be better served with another stronger-flavored pepper like an Anaheim or even more Bells than the Cubanelles for something like a Wing Sauce. All they're providing is sweet bulk at a likely higher price.

But again - I'm definitely not trying to rain on your parade. I just noticed your asterisk next to the Cubanelles that they should be seeded if one didn't want additional heat. Cubanelles simply don't have any heat to give, seeded or not.
Thanks for the input
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