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Old 04-04-2007, 05:32 PM   #11
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I heard that the skin of the tomatoes actually increases acidity. I've always been told it's best to skin them before you start making any sauce. Anyone know if this is true?
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Old 04-04-2007, 06:30 PM   #12
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When I make sauce using fresh tomatoes, I always skin them but I don't know if it reduces the acidity.
My husband gets heartburn as well. He just uses an antacid afterwards. I'm going to try the baking soda next time to see if it works for him.
Thanks for the tips.
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Old 04-04-2007, 09:39 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CherryRed
I heard that the skin of the tomatoes actually increases acidity. I've always been told it's best to skin them before you start making any sauce. Anyone know if this is true?
Most canned tomato is peeled so that should not be a factor.
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Old 04-08-2007, 01:58 PM   #14
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I ALWAYS add a dollop of ketchup to my tomato sauce. That cuts down on the acidity because of the sugar in the ketchup.

Hope this helps
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Old 04-08-2007, 02:02 PM   #15
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I use some splenda.
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Old 04-08-2007, 04:02 PM   #16
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Have used the bicarb but find I have to use it very sparingly or it dulls the flavor.
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Old 04-08-2007, 04:20 PM   #17
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Sufficient amount of "sofritto" (well-sautčed mixture of finely chopped onion, carrot and garlic) will tone down the acidity of tomatoes, not only that, add some great flavour. My pasta sauce can not be done without it!!
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Old 04-09-2007, 02:59 AM   #18
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Catch-22

There are two things going on here: (1) Actual acidity (the actual acid content that causes indigestion) and (2) Perceived acidity - the taste in your mouth.

Catch-22: Both acid and sugar enhance the tomato flavor in a tomato sauce. Using something like baking soda to chemically neutralize the actual acid content will, as auntdot noted, "dull" the flavor. Jabbur's idea of using a touch of Hershey's Syrup is not without merit as I found out after a little investigating ... it's made from Dutch Processed chocolate (chocolate treated with an alkaline), which is about as alkaline as baking soda (pH=8), so it should work chemically as an acid neutralizer.

Urmaniac13's "sofritto" will not chemically reduce the actual acid content but will balance the flavors. The carrots do not add a "sugary" sweetness like table sugar ... just a flavor balance. Ironically ... if you don't want to use carrots, dark brown sugar is a better option than refined white table sugar because the molasses contains some flavor components found in tomatoes.

How to Reduce The Acid in the Beginning: The majority of the acid in a tomato is in the juice and jelly surrounding the seeds. So, cutting a tomato in half and squeezing out the seeds and jelly (aka "seeding") a tomato reduces the acidity by about 2/3 - it's not just to get rid of the seeds. But, this is not without consequences ... the jelly and seeds also contain flavors that will be lost if discarded before cooking.

In the end: Acidity can be reduced in the sauce but it will be at the expense of flavor. To preserve the flavor - perhaps an antacid prior to eating might be the solution?
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