"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Sauces
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-14-2012, 07:37 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Chef Maloney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: S.California
Posts: 455
Bechamel Sauce recipe

Some people like to add some grated nutmeg/salt & pepper/onion/clove/or a bit of bouquet garni to their sauce.
The french recipes I have seen contain the salt, pepper & nutmeg to taste.
Here is a basic recipe I use for bechamel sauce with the proper ratio of flour/butter/milk content.

BECHAMEL SAUCE

5 Tablespoons Butter
5 Tablespoons Flour
1 Quart Milk

In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, melt the Butter.
Add the Flour, whisking until the butter is completely absorbed.
Cook for 2 - 3 minutes, whisking constantly.
Remove from the heat.
Gradually pour in the Milk, whisking constantly.
Return to medium heat, return to a boiL, whisking constantly.
Lower heat and continue cooking for 8 - 10 minutes, whisking.
If desired, it is at this point that some people like to add a dash of salt, pepper & nutmeg to taste.
The sauce is done and ready to use.
Also, If desired, an onion, peeled, halved and studded w/a whole clove can be placed in the sauce. Simmer & Stir for an additional 15 minutes, then strain the sauce.
Store this sauce in an air-tight container in the refrigerator to prevent a skin from forming.
smile

__________________

__________________
Chef Maloney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2012, 09:47 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3,899
Cool .. thanks for sharing this.
__________________

__________________
MrsLMB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2012, 11:04 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kylie1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 13,936
This sounds lovely Chef
__________________
All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt
Kylie1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2012, 12:53 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,068
Is this for a thin, medium or thick sauce?
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2012, 03:54 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kylie1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 13,936
I think Bechamel sauce, what I have had in the past is of a thicker consistency Ads, but you could probably have it to your liking by adding less flour I am thinking...not sure though
__________________
All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt
Kylie1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2012, 04:06 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylie1969 View Post
I think Bechamel sauce, what I have had in the past is of a thicker consistency Ads, but you could probably have it to your liking by adding less flour I am thinking...not sure though
The standared for bechamel is
One + one + one. One table spoon of fat, one tablespoon of flour and one cup of liquid. That makes a thin sauce. If you want to make it thicker you up it to 2+2+2. For a really thick sauce then you up to the 3's.

But the longer you learn cooking, you learn to play with the numbers. When I make mac and cheese, I use a whole pound of elbows and I know that it is going to absorb a lot of the liquid. So I usually use the 2's except for the liquid. I will add a quart of liquid or even more. So I want the sauce to be somewhat soupy and loose. The cheese also helps thicken it as it melts. So I have to take that into consideration also.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2012, 05:10 AM   #7
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,412
Here is my TNT for bechamel sauce. To me the most important ratio to maintain goes to butter/flour. The liquid in the recipe is adjusted "on-the-fly" to achieve the desired consistency for a specific dish. For example, cream gravy uses more milk than peas in cream sauce.

Bechamel Sauce
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yield: 1 cup

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
1 1/4 cups milk, heated
Salt
Freshly ground pepper

Directions:

1. Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Stir in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, until the paste cooks and bubbles a bit, but don't let it brown — about 2 minutes. Add the hot milk, continuing to stir as the sauce thickens. Bring it to a boil. Add salt and pepper to taste, lower the heat, and cook, stirring for 2 to 3 minutes more. Remove from the heat. To cool this sauce for later use, cover it with wax paper or pour a film of milk over it to prevent a skin from forming.

2. Cheese Sauce Stir in 1/2 cup grated Cheddar cheese during the last 2 minutes of cooking, along with a pinch of cayenne pepper.

3. How hot should the milk be? Warm the milk on low heat just until little bubbles begin to form at the edges. Then remove from heat. Do NOT allow to scorch.

Notes:

The foolproof way to attain a perfectly smooth sauce is to have the milk hot when added to the butter and flour. It is possible with practice to use cold milk. This seems to work best if 1/2 cup of milk is added first to "start" the sauce before adding the remainder.
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2012, 03:34 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I usually like to cook the butter and flour on lower heat, but a fair bit longer, still not browning it. I really detest the taste of raw flour in bechamel. In fact, until I started making it myself I avoided it in restaurants because it had been gross every time I tried it.

I have never bothered to heat the milk, but I do add it a little bit at a time as Forty-Caliber mentioned. I don't know how much milk I use. I just add milk until it is the thickness I want.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2012, 05:50 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I usually like to cook the butter and flour on lower heat, but a fair bit longer, still not browning it. I really detest the taste of raw flour in bechamel. In fact, until I started making it myself I avoided it in restaurants because it had been gross every time I tried it.

I have never bothered to heat the milk, but I do add it a little bit at a time as Forty-Caliber mentioned. I don't know how much milk I use. I just add milk until it is the thickness I want.
I never measure the fat and flour. Just toss in a little scoop that I keep in my flour canister, of flour and cut off a chunk of butter. Then pour in the milk when the roux is ready and has cooked until the rawness is gone. This is one of those sauces that with years of experience, you "just know." Like pouring salt into the palm of your hand for the pasta water.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2012, 10:52 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I never measure the fat and flour. Just toss in a little scoop that I keep in my flour canister, of flour and cut off a chunk of butter. Then pour in the milk when the roux is ready and has cooked until the rawness is gone. This is one of those sauces that with years of experience, you "just know." Like pouring salt into the palm of your hand for the pasta water.
I don't measure the butter or flour either. I don't think the ratio is the same with whole wheat flour. I just guesstimate the amount of butter and keep sprinkling flour on and stirring until it looks right.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
recipe, sauce

Bechamel Sauce recipe Some people like to add some grated nutmeg/salt & pepper/onion/clove/or a bit of bouquet garni to their sauce. The french recipes I have seen contain the salt, pepper & nutmeg to taste. Here is a basic recipe I use for bechamel sauce with the proper ratio of flour/butter/milk content. BECHAMEL SAUCE 5 Tablespoons Butter 5 Tablespoons Flour 1 Quart Milk In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, melt the Butter. Add the Flour, whisking until the butter is completely absorbed. Cook for 2 - 3 minutes, whisking constantly. Remove from the heat. Gradually pour in the Milk, whisking constantly. Return to medium heat, return to a boiL, whisking constantly. Lower heat and continue cooking for 8 - 10 minutes, whisking. If desired, it is at this point that some people like to add a dash of salt, pepper & nutmeg to taste. The sauce is done and ready to use. Also, If desired, an onion, peeled, halved and studded w/a whole clove can be placed in the sauce. Simmer & Stir for an additional 15 minutes, then strain the sauce. Store this sauce in an air-tight container in the refrigerator to prevent a skin from forming. smile :smile: 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.