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Old 12-12-2011, 03:49 PM   #1
Join Date: Aug 2011
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Chaud et Froid

A 1987 newpaper article describes a restaurant dish I would like to recreate for my sister as "Chaud et Froid (showd-fwah or "hot-cold," an open face grilled sandwich of turkey breast and bacon topped with cheese sauce)".

That desciption is generally the same as the "Kentucky Hot Brown". However the Chaud-Froid sauce described in the Joy Of Cooking differs from the mornay in Bobby Flay's Hot Brown through the addition of gelatin. Since I have only the description of the Chaud et Froid and not the recipe, how do I gauge the importance of the gelatin aspect in the sauce? How and how much gelatin would I add to a bechamel to create Chaud-Froid sauce? What difference in texture and taste would be expected?

Thanks again


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Old 12-12-2011, 04:08 PM   #2
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It sounds to me like two different things.

On grand buffets a ham or turkey breast chaud-froid is covered in a mayonnaise/gelatin coating and decorated with diamonds made out of truffles and flowers made from vegetables etc.

The chaud et froid , I think refers to the hot sauce and the cold turkey.

I may be wrong but, I think they are just giving you an ooh-la-la name on a Hot Brown, lipstick on a pig.

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Old 12-12-2011, 09:20 PM   #3
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A Chaud et Froid traditionally is cooked chilled poultry coated in aspic. That's why there's gelatin involved.

Aspics are generally clear. Adding gelatin to mornay sauce sounds like a recipe for disaster and pretty unappetizing, frankly. Sorry.
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