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Old 10-31-2008, 07:15 PM   #1
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Demi Glace Gold

Are you familiar with this? I love gravies & sauces for my meats. From watching cooking shows, I gather this is a bought paste that you can add to pan juices to make a really tasty sauce. Any experience with this? Expensive? I gather it is very difficult to make it yourself.

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Old 11-01-2008, 01:50 AM   #2
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A real Demi-Glace is not quick or easy to make. If you want to get an appreciation for what is involved, and why the "Demi-Glace Gold" is not cheap ... check your library and see if they have a copy of Auguste Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire: A Guide to Modern Cookery (or see if they can get it on inter-library loan if you live in a small town) and read what is involved.

Here is the website for Demi-Glace Gold.
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Old 11-01-2008, 05:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kokomoj View Post
Are you familiar with this? I love gravies & sauces for my meats. From watching cooking shows, I gather this is a bought paste that you can add to pan juices to make a really tasty sauce. Any experience with this? Expensive? I gather it is very difficult to make it yourself.

Yes, Kokomoj.......it is not "difficult" to make but it is VERY time consuming. I locally found a one POUND jar of it for $34 and an 8 ounce jar for $12. Considering you do not use much of this when you DO use it, the cost of it is WELL worth the investment. In comparison to the time, cost, money, the total investment on your part, the cost of the already made is well worth it, IMHO, that is!
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Old 11-01-2008, 05:10 PM   #4
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So, exactly how do you use it? To create sauces from scratch? To supplement pan juices?
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Old 11-02-2008, 12:25 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Kokomoj View Post
So, exactly how do you use it? To create sauces from scratch? To supplement pan juices?
Demi glace used in all the great restaurants to make those silky smooth, velvety, rich tasting brown sauces and soups.

If you make demi-glace at home it takes a tedious 25 hours or more, including buying and roasting all the bones, simmering, watching, straining, herbs, and cleaning. You make 3 different stocks which you then put them together and then that is carefully cooked down/reduced until it is a deeply flavored glaze. Just to give you an idea, you would make those 3 different stocks which start out with approx 2 gallons of liquid which you cook down to approx 1 gallon each. You then take those 3 gallons and mix them together and cook those down to the 1 gallon which ends up being your demi-glace! So you can see how time consuming it can be! Worth it, tho!

Buying the bones is a chore in itself because you use a multitude of them as well as a variety, including beef, pork, lamb, veal, etc., to name a few types. They should be cut/sawed into 2 inch pieces to get the optimal flavor out of them as they roast…..

It’s a job to make but it IS well worth it. If you would like the recipe for making it from “scratch”, let me know as it is well work making it if you have the time, and I would recommend making it at least once!


This is what the “Reconstitution Breakdown” is on the jar I have:

1 ounce makes 4 - 5 ounces of classic demi glace when reconstituted, perfect for making a classic sauce for 4 people.

For Recipes calling for Demi-Glace:
1/4 cup demi-glace = 1/2 oz. reconstituted in 2 oz. hot water
1/2 cup demi-glace = 1 oz. reconstituted in 4 oz. hot water
1 cup demi-glace = 1 1/2 oz. reconstituted in 1 cup of hot water.
2 cups demi-glace = 3 oz. reconstituted in 2 cups hot water
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Old 11-02-2008, 07:34 PM   #6
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Thanks, I'm retired, so I guess I have the time. Don't know about the patience. I'll try some of the bought stuff first. I can see why it is so expensive. Hope it's good. I bought a jar of canned roux one time in Louisiana and it was horrible, stale, stinky.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:18 AM   #7
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Actually, doesn't it depend on what KIND of demi-glace you're making? Because there are definitely different types - the combination you describe, but also individualized as in poultry, beef, veal, pork, etc.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:34 AM   #8
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Yes, Kokomoj.......it is not "difficult" to make but it is VERY time consuming. I locally found a one POUND jar of it for $34 and an 8 ounce jar for $12. Considering you do not use much of this when you DO use it, the cost of it is WELL worth the investment. In comparison to the time, cost, money, the total investment on your part, the cost of the already made is well worth it, IMHO, that is!
I can't really add anything else to this post. I was going to make it from scratch one weekend, but the cost of the ingredients and time was more than what you can buy it prepared. Maybe over the winter I'll make it, buy will definately plan ahead.

I picked up a jar of this since my local supermarkets were like: When I asked them if they carried it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kokomoj View Post
So, exactly how do you use it? To create sauces from scratch? To supplement pan juices?
The one I bought is beef demi. I use it in pan sauces even stews. For instance, cook a steak in a pan, remove add some shallot and deglaze with a little red wine. Reduce the wine 1/2 and add 1 teaspoon of the demi paste and incorporate into the wine. Add beef stock or broth, thyme and a bay leaf and simmer for a few minutes while the meat is resting. Remove the thyme sprigs and bay leaf and finish with a tablespoon of cold butter.

That's just one of the many different variations. I also make a sauce that starts out almost like beef stew using mire poix and fresh herbs, demi, beef broth. I make that in a sauce pan usually for grilled meats.

It's kind of like using tomato paste to give a sauce depth and body. Just keep it away from your guests so they don't know what your secret weapon is.
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Old 11-03-2008, 11:30 AM   #9
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Demi Glace gold is ok but doesn't really replicate real demi glace, IMO.
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Old 11-03-2008, 11:45 AM   #10
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I picked up a jar of this since my local supermarkets were like: When I asked them if they carried it.
Not a bad price, Jeekinz....I paid $34, not much more than what you paid. Don't think you would ever find it in a supermarket since it is such a high gourmet item, both in quality and cost!

I've never heard of a "chicken" based demi glace, and from all the recipes I've seen for making it have beef, pork, and veal bones.

As far as other ways to use it, aside from doing an internet search, most jars have those little recipe books attached to them with those elastic ties. Make sure the jar you pick up has one of those as there are a multitude of ideas in those little books as well.
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