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Old 01-15-2013, 04:57 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I am sorry, I know we have a whole bunch of Gravy threads; I've looked at them, but really did not find what I needed. Itís been few years since the first time I have asked for help with flour type gravy here and I have to say I have been making excellent gravy thanks to all the help I got back then. Thank you. My gravy works like a charm. However last night my wife asked me to make some gravy which I was happy to do. The result was how I should say it, weird. I end up with excellent gravy but on the top of it was swimming with fat/oil. Iíve had lumpy gravy, bad tasting gravy, too thick of gravy, to thin too, tasteless, to salty, not salty enough. To watery to oily, but never, never had I had gravy that was made of almost two separate substances. It tasted great, was very good consistency, there were no lumps, but there was that oil swimming on the top, and I could not get rid of it and I could not understand where itís coming from or why. It was as if flour took needed amount of fat for it to become gravy and rejected the rest of oil I had in the pan. I am all ears, help me please.
What was the color of this gravy when you were done making it?
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:07 PM   #12
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What did your fat/flour mixture look like? Like a paste?

Did you whisk the liquid in like the dickens?
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:14 PM   #13
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Your ratio fo fat/flour is spot on. however, when I make my flour based gravies, I cook the roux until it is lightly browned, and then start adding the broth, a little at a time while stirring vigorously with a whisk. I continue adding broth until I achieve the consistency I'm looking for.

The only time I've ever had excess oil on top of my gravy was when using a broth that came from a fatty meat, and didn't skim or separate the extra oil from the broth before adding it to my roux.

I wonder if, as with various sauces, if you bring your gravy to too high a temp, could it break, i.e. proteins coagulate, and oils separate out?

The cause of excess oil has to be either too much oil, or the sauce breaking.

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Old 01-15-2013, 05:20 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
What did your fat/flour mixture look like? Like a paste?

Did you whisk the liquid in like the dickens?
+1. Next time try using schmalz instead of oil.
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:03 PM   #15
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It sounds as if the oil was not stirred enough before adding the broth. You might have been able to add an egg yolk (tempered). Since yolks contain lecithin, the phospholipid would have (a) bound with the water and the other end of the molecule would have coated the oil, reducing the separation of the two (water and oil).

Now you've made me hungry for something with gravy...
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:11 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
...if you bring your gravy to too high a temp, could it break, i.e. proteins coagulate, and oils separate out?...

I can't imagine a gravy made with fat, flour and broth breaking. Part of the process if making this kind of gravy is bringing it to a boil. That doesn't break it.

Besides, as Charlies said, the gravy under the fat was right on.
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:31 PM   #17
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:53 PM   #18
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I can't imagine a gravy made with fat, flour and broth breaking. Part of the process if making this kind of gravy is bringing it to a boil. That doesn't break it.

Besides, as Charlies said, the gravy under the fat was right on.
You're right. The gravy needs to come to a boil for the flour to thicken it.

I'm guessing that the oil didn't totally emulsify because there wasn't enough mechanical action.
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:38 AM   #19
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Andy and JennyEmma. You are correct of course. What was I thinking. I was just reaching, and comparing apples to oranges, or rather gravy to cheese sauce in my mind. Thank you for the corrections. So I change my diagnosis to agree with yours, too much fat, or too little mixing.

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Old 01-16-2013, 10:39 AM   #20
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It could have been the flour, maybe a lighter grade than usual? anyway, the paper towel method is great in that situation. it soundsas if you are a great gravy maker.Just one of those things!
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