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Old 01-16-2013, 05:56 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
TL--you also forgot POUTINE!
Yeah, but I have never made poutine. I don't really make French fries. I suppose I could always oven fry some 'taters. Yeah, I should pick up some cheese curds at Costco. I'm making "bankekřd" for supper and there will be loads of gravy left.
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:13 PM   #32
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Gravy Queen-- In the Southern US savory baked biscuits are often served at breakfast instead of toast. Or at dinner with butter and jam or honey,especially "Sunday Dinners" with fried chicken. Biscuits make a terrific Ham Sandwich. These are associated as more Southern in orientation or possible origin. Biscuits and gravy is either a side dish, along with eggs and fried potatoes and more, or as a main dish. Interestingly, in the South it is not a big thing, and in general, restaurant charges are minimal, in the $3-4 US range. The farther north you get, it increases in value somehow, and Here, a plate of biscuits and gravy runs about $9-10 US per serving. Also, the farther north you get, biscuit recipes Suffer. If you make scones, you know the difference between light feathery layers on the tongue vs heavy as a brick. It takes a deft touch to make good biscuits.

Now, as far as the gravy part goes-- here's a comparitive recipe. It's not for the faint of heart but will get your motor going in the morning if you have a big day ahead of you. This one uses both bacon drippings and I didn't look farther, but when I make sausage gravy, I do not remove the cooking fat after the sausage is cooked and crumbled. That is the oil part that gives the gravy its good flavor.

Biscuits with Sausage and Sage Gravy - Pinch My Salt
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:38 PM   #33
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Gravy Queen-- In the Southern US savory baked biscuits are often served at breakfast instead of toast. Or at dinner with butter and jam or honey,especially "Sunday Dinners" with fried chicken. Biscuits make a terrific Ham Sandwich. These are associated as more Southern in orientation or possible origin. Biscuits and gravy is either a side dish, along with eggs and fried potatoes and more, or as a main dish. Interestingly, in the South it is not a big thing, and in general, restaurant charges are minimal, in the $3-4 US range. The farther north you get, it increases in value somehow, and Here, a plate of biscuits and gravy runs about $9-10 US per serving. Also, the farther north you get, biscuit recipes Suffer. If you make scones, you know the difference between light feathery layers on the tongue vs heavy as a brick. It takes a deft touch to make good biscuits.

Now, as far as the gravy part goes-- here's a comparitive recipe. It's not for the faint of heart but will get your motor going in the morning if you have a big day ahead of you. This one uses both bacon drippings and I didn't look farther, but when I make sausage gravy, I do not remove the cooking fat after the sausage is cooked and crumbled. That is the oil part that gives the gravy its good flavor.

Biscuits with Sausage and Sage Gravy - Pinch My Salt
Maybe I'm just lucky, but my mother made great biscuits, as do I. I grew up in, and still live in Sault Ste. Marie, MI, about as far North as you can get in the continental U.S. Great biscuits aren't unusual up here. And I've had many a breakfast of biscuits and gravy that would rival anything in the South. We also make a very light and delicious dumpling from biscuit dough.

Yes, I have had hockey pucks that looked like biscuits before. But they were the exception, not the rule (or is that biscuits that feel like hockey pucks, hmmmm.).

Just as there are people who make outstanding French food in, say, New York City, there are people who make the same here. What we really lack around here is Tex/Mex, and authentic Mexican food experience. And though I make a mean taco, Carne Asada, Shredded Beef, and several other foods of that genre, I am merely a beginner compared to many who live in the Southwest.

Great food of any type can be attained by anyone willing to put in the time and work to learn how to properly make that food. Of course there are regional variants to the food we eat, based on available ingredients, what we are used to eating, climate, and other factors. But in my opinion, one should learn as many techniques, and styles of cooking as possible. It makes life richer, and gives you many more options to create good food for yourself, and those you love, or want to serve to.

Ok, I'm done now. I just have a thing about stereotypes. I believe that anyone with a knack for cooking, no matter where they live, can make something as good, as someone from another geographic region. I don't like the whole South verses North thing, or East verses West. There are great cooks all over the place, who can make great biscuits in the North, and great baked beans in the South. Many think you have to be Southern to make the best ribs. It's just not true. Just ask anyone who's eaten my ribs. And I've had some pretty good ribs in California, and in Maryland as well. Regional is all in the mind, again, my opinion.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:55 PM   #34
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Great food of any type can be attained by anyone willing to put in the time and work to learn how to properly make that food. Of course there are regional variants to the food we eat, based on available ingredients, what we are used to eating, climate, and other factors. But in my opinion, one should learn as many techniques, and styles of cooking as possible. It makes life richer, and gives you many more options to create good food for yourself, and those you love, or want to serve to.

Ok, I'm done now. I just have a thing about stereotypes. I believe that anyone with a knack for cooking, no matter where they live, can make something as good, as someone from another geographic region. I don't like the whole South verses North thing, or East verses West. There are great cooks all over the place, who can make great biscuits in the North, and great baked beans in the South. Many think you have to be Southern to make the best ribs. It's just not true. Just ask anyone who's eaten my ribs. And I've had some pretty good ribs in California, and in Maryland as well. Regional is all in the mind, again, my opinion.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
It's true what you say Chief, as I watched myself write whole generalities very loosely like they are vast truths. In reality, of course, there is more than one can say in a few paragraphs.
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Old 01-16-2013, 07:43 PM   #35
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Whiska, I was quite surprised by the post I commented on. I've always known you to be so non-judgemental, and a generally great poster. With your response to my response, you clearly meant no prejudice against Northern cooking.

I looked at your biscuits and gravy recipe, and mine is similar, except, after adding the flour, I pour my milk into the pan, a little at a time, while stirring fairly vigorously with a slotted spoon, until the gravy is the consistency I want. Also, I let the flour/fat mixture cook with the sausage a bit, to get rid of that raw flour flavor. My only seasoning is salt, as my DW is hyper-sensitive to pepper, and isn't crazy about sage. But I take her portion out, then season the rest with pepper and sage.

The gravy in biscuits and gravy, is simply, in most cases, a veloute', altered to fit the dish (look up mother sauces).

Now, some gravies can be very complex, like demi-glace, while others are as simple as pouring a cornstarch slurry into a broth. Sauce making is an art, and can be as simple and as complex as we want to make it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-16-2013, 08:08 PM   #36
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...The gravy in biscuits and gravy, is simply, in most cases, a veloute', altered to fit the dish (look up mother sauces)...
Chief, if anyone looks it up, they will discover the sauce is a Béchamel altered to fit the dish.
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Old 01-16-2013, 08:43 PM   #37
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Chief, if anyone looks it up, they will discover the sauce is a Béchamel altered to fit the dish.
Miriam-Webster dictionary states that the French word, Veloute' translates to Velvet. And those Bechemel and Veloute' are both similar in texture, the similarity ends there. Bechemel' is a creamy sauce composed of a blonde, or white roux, seasoned with salt and nutmeg, and thinned into a sauce by the addition of milk or cream. While a veloute' is composed of a blonde roux, that is used to thicken a broth, and always contains some kind of protien based flavor, i.e. veal, chicken, pork, fish, etc. The specific veloute' is named for the meat that flavors it, as in chicken veloute'.

I believe that there are elements of both in sausage gravy, meat flavor from the sausage, and dairy. Maybe we should stick to calling it sausage gravy, and agree that it has elements of both mother sauces in it.

I can't argue that you are wrong. But then again, the description of Veloute' points this particular sauce in that direction as well. I think that correctly, we would call this one a derivative, or small sauce. But of which mother sauce, I can't really commit.

What shall we call it when it's Red-Eye Gravy?

You're a good man, Andy. Me, I'm confused.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:59 PM   #38
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I will further complicate matters in that I like the flour to cook quite a bit until it is a nice tan color, not going so far as nutty brown as in some roux's. Mine is anything but white. I often cook some diced onion with the sausage, and it has a head start, so to speak, colorwise, at the point where milk is stirred in. I think letting the flour cook and stirred makes for a richer deeper flavor.

I make this to suit my own taste, so I do add a little sage, sometimes a good pinch of chili flakes if I want to spark the gravy up a bit. I don't use salt, as I think there is enough salt in the sausage, but that is again, personal preference. I almost always use Jimmy Dean's Plain bulk sausage, sometimes a meat market house made. I know I am going to up the herbs, so I want to start with a more basic flavor.

I found a bottle of Savory in the cupboard, it has a very fresh flavor, but I don't remember buying it or how long ago. Nor why it is not marked summer or winter savory. Nor do I remember where I got it, so it will be hard to replicate again. A good pinch of this is going in the next time I make sausage gravy. It seems to go good with pork and ground beef and in stews, so I think it would work good in gravy.

Well, this is some distance from Charlie's original dilemma. And with the talk of sausage gravy, it is a direction he may not wish to participate. The conversation does show we all like a good gravy and for it to come out the way we like it.
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Old 01-17-2013, 05:34 AM   #39
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Yeah, but I have never made poutine. I don't really make French fries. I suppose I could always oven fry some 'taters. Yeah, I should pick up some cheese curds at Costco. I'm making "bankekřd" for supper and there will be loads of gravy left.
The Winter edition of the LCBO Food and Drink mag has an oven-fried version of poutine. It isn't available online yet, but I can grab a copy of the mag for you.
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:05 AM   #40
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Lawks, I am handing my crown over you are all Gravy Queens .

What an interesting discussion from a little old gravy thread . Thanks Whiskadoodle for that link , seeing a photo made a difference but I still can't get my English head round scones and gravy Also you all seem to use gravy as a general term for a sauce, that photo on the link to me looked like scones in a cream sauce but hey it's just words . I learn so much on here
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