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Old 04-21-2015, 10:13 AM   #31
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Don't remember if I learned this using mint or sage leaves. Stack some leaves up. Roll like a cigar and finely mince with a sharp knife. Never knew how to make a chiffonade before and it beats tearing leaves or cutting with a kitchen scissors.

Another way I like to use fresh sage is sprinkle some finely minced leaves on small potatoes with a little oil and roast. ( I use some rosemary leaves too. )
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Old 04-21-2015, 11:24 AM   #32
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Rosemary is indeed a heartbreaker. It's not hardy to my area. I dig mine up, repot it, take it inside and give it bunches of TLC, and it rewards me by shedding its needles all over the floor. So, like thyme, I get a new rosemary every year. Haven't tried growing bay yet, but if it acts like that, I probably won't.
Plant your rosemary in a pot and then bring the pot into the house in fall. This rosemary pot has two plants. One is three years old and the other one is four.
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:04 PM   #33
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Rosemary is indeed a heartbreaker. It's not hardy to my area. I dig mine up, repot it, take it inside and give it bunches of TLC, and it rewards me by shedding its needles all over the floor. So, like thyme, I get a new rosemary every year. Haven't tried growing bay yet, but if it acts like that, I probably won't.
Rosemary isn't supposed to be able to survive in Colorado's winter either, but we had a rosemary plant at our house in Littleton (southwest Denver metro) that came back year after year. It was planted on the terrace in the back yard, right below a rock wall. Because the wall faced south, it reflected the winter sun directly on the bush, and sheltered it from the worst winter winds. Although the bush would look dead each spring, soon new growth would start, and by June I had plenty of rosemary for cooking and just to put some sprigs in water to give the kitchen a wonderful aroma. I would harvest part of what was left in the fall and dry it for use during the winter. That little shrub is the one and only gardening success of my life. By the time we sold the house and moved away, the main trunk of the bush was about 2 inches in diameter, but only about 4 inches tall. I made sure that I told the new owners about it so that they wouldn't dig it up after the first winter, thinking that it was dead.
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:22 PM   #34
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Has anyone ever put sage in their tomato sauce?

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Plant your rosemary in a pot and then bring the pot into the house in fall. This rosemary pot has two plants. One is three years old and the other one is four.

I've nursemaided several rosemarys over the years, and replanted them outside, but they looked so ratty that I just buy a new, lush plant each year.

RP, sounds like you had a rosemary bonsai!
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:30 PM   #35
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I've nursemaided several rosemarys over the years, and replanted them outside, but they looked so ratty that I just buy a new, lush plant each year.
Have you tried leaving it in the pot permanently, rather than replanting it twice a year? Disturbing the roots like that might be the problem.
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:41 PM   #36
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I've done it both ways. And I agree, rosemary does resent transplanting.
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Old 04-21-2015, 01:15 PM   #37
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Have you tried leaving it in the pot permanently, rather than replanting it twice a year? Disturbing the roots like that might be the problem.
That's what I think too. I have never planted the rosemary in the ground. I have had a previous rosemary plant survive well indoors and out. I think I forgot to water that one for too long and that's why I don't still have it.
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:11 PM   #38
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So, I have this friend who has recently gotten into gardening and cooking. He talks as if he knows what he is doing to impress me, but I usually question everything that comes out of his mouth.

Recently he made an Italian marinara sauce. He told me that he put sage in it and it was great. Im not doubting it, I just have never done it myself or come across a recipe that calls for sage when making marinara sauce. So, I'm just curious if anyone else does it, has done it or heard of it, and how did it taste ??

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Sage is used a lot in Italian cooking - for example in saltimbocca. It's very strong so you need to be careful with it. If you like sage (and a lot of people don't) there doesn't seem to be any reason why you shouldn't put it in your marinara sauce. Law enforcement in Italy seems chaotic enough without having to worry about extraditing DC-ers for putting the "wrong" herb in marinara
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:18 PM   #39
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I've nursemaided several rosemarys over the years, and replanted them outside, but they looked so ratty that I just buy a new, lush plant each year.

RP, sounds like you had a rosemary bonsai!
There is a long established Rosemary bush just outside my back door. Mother must have planted it a good 30 or 40 years ago. It's very leggy but with a good "bush" of leaves at the top and has leaves all winter. I suspect that it has gone far too many years without pruning and it's to far gone to start now. The flavour is still good though.

We can overwinter rosemary in the garden in my part of England. Not sure about further north and in Scotland though.
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Old 04-21-2015, 04:53 PM   #40
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There is a long established Rosemary bush just outside my back door. Mother must have planted it a good 30 or 40 years ago. It's very leggy but with a good "bush" of leaves at the top and has leaves all winter. I suspect that it has gone far too many years without pruning and it's to far gone to start now. The flavour is still good though.

We can overwinter rosemary in the garden in my part of England. Not sure about further north and in Scotland though.
My wife and I stayed in an agritourismo in Tuscany, 4 miles outside of Sienna. the walkway to our room was fenced with a rosemary hedge. That was amazing to see for a guy who has always lived in a more northern climate.
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