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Old 12-13-2008, 03:40 PM   #1
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Help. . .my homemade hot sauce is WAY too hot!!

I like hot sauce hot. . .but I made some with chili bonnets and jalapeno's and it is just too darn hot. The recipe called for the peppers, garlic, vinegar, spices and dry mustard.

Any suggestions to "cool it down" just a bit? Sugar? Dairy? It is so hot I feel as though I will never be able to use it!!

Thanks much!!

Muy Caliente!!

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Old 12-13-2008, 03:44 PM   #2
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Make another batch not so hot...Mix the two....

Have Fun!
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Old 12-13-2008, 03:58 PM   #3
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Well, Mysharonany Muy Caliente,

Lo siento mucho! There is no turning it down the bonfire once you've lit it up, unless you add more of the other sauce ingredients to tone it down.......don't know how much of the stuff you've made already and how much you really want on hand and your budget, etc.........the heat is in the seeds.......when you make it next time be sure that you've deseeded the peppers first (use disposable exam gloves if you can find them there) save the seeds and you can add back a smidgeon at a time to get the heat that you want........your other ingredients in your present recipe don't sound much of a fire extinguisher to me.......however you can have some yogurt sauce on the side to cool down the tongue...raita comes to mind and it's an Indian side dish as some of their dishes are very hot......usually dill is added to raita......just google it if you still are of the mind to salvage savaged tongues.............water and alcohol are the worst sides to go with it.......bonnet chiles esp. have a high heat index.......

buena suerte and welcome to DC........we have all been in your shoes at one time or another.........
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Old 12-13-2008, 04:14 PM   #4
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Thanks expatgirl!! I purposely left in the seeds. . crazy I know. But deep down I thought the peppers weren't going to be THAT hot. My bad!! I was even thinking of adding a little yogurt and then putting it back into the blender. It would make it a bit creamy. . .who know. . .just a thought. But I do like the idea of raita on the side (I already have a pretty good recipe for that as well).

Thanks for the welcome and I am looking forward to getting some more great ideas from this site!!

Thanks again . .you too Uncle Bob!!
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Old 12-13-2008, 04:22 PM   #5
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Actually, from what I've heard/read, the most heat being in the "seeds" is a fallacy. The primary heat is supposedly in the pepper ribs. Folks just believe it's the seeds because they're attached to the ribs.

If you want milder pepper sauce, be sure to scrape out not only the seeds, but the white ribs of the peppers as well before using.
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Old 12-13-2008, 04:26 PM   #6
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welcome mysharonany. (my sharona ny?)

you could try an experiment with a small batch. add some vinegar to thin it out, and blend in some peanut butter.

i've noticed that ground peanuts in thai dishes helps top cut the heat from the peppers, so a little peanut butter in your sauce might help.
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Old 12-13-2008, 04:39 PM   #7
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not sure if you should add the yogurt to the vinegar in the peppers as they might separate and you might want a small amount of each to test togethert just to be sure.......but do serve raita on the side in case it does curdle.........buena suerte!!
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Old 12-13-2008, 04:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Actually, from what I've heard/read, the most heat being in the "seeds" is a fallacy. The primary heat is supposedly in the pepper ribs. Folks just believe it's the seeds because they're attached to the ribs.

If you want milder pepper sauce, be sure to scrape out not only the seeds, but the white ribs of the peppers as well before using.
YOu might be right, BC, but I remove both the seeds and the membranes together anyway........whether they are sweet peppers or hot peppers.....Scotch bonnets deseeded and demembraned are hot enough for us alone and we love spicy........so I could certainly see where the membranes would be at fault and/or the source as well......
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Old 12-13-2008, 07:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Actually, from what I've heard/read, the most heat being in the "seeds" is a fallacy. The primary heat is supposedly in the pepper ribs. Folks just believe it's the seeds because they're attached to the ribs.

If you want milder pepper sauce, be sure to scrape out not only the seeds, but the white ribs of the peppers as well before using.
The fallacy is that the heat comes from the seeds, not that the seeds are hot. The seeds actually are hot, but it is just because of their proximity to the ribs. All of the heat is contained in the ribs. Since the seeds touch the ribs some of the oil transfers to the seeds and thus the seed are hot.

Yes, the best way to cut the heat of your sauce is to make another batch with little or no heat then combine the two. This is the only way to keep the flavor the same, but lower the heat. Adding anything else (like dairy) can help cut the heat as well, if you do not mind changing the flavor and texture.
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Old 12-13-2008, 09:52 PM   #10
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By "bonnets" I am guessing you mean "Scottish Bonnets," like habaneros. Anything using plural habs is going to be too hot. I know...I use them frequently. A mixture of habs and serranos should bring a strong man to his knees. Make another batch with no peppers, and mix the two. Good luck.
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