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Old 01-29-2016, 08:36 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Ha! Pretty much!
Mayo is made using a oil like OO.
Hollandaise is made using butter. Hollandaise is considered one of the five 'mother sauces' in classic French cuisine.
Mayo is served chilled. Hollandaise is served warm.
There is a fundamental difference between the two.
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Old 01-29-2016, 08:56 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Mayo is made using a oil like OO.
Hollandaise is made using butter. Hollandaise is considered one of the five 'mother sauces' in classic French cuisine.
Mayo is served chilled. Hollandaise is served warm.
There is a fundamental difference between the two.
Umm, mayo can be made with melted butter by itself or in combo with oil. The butter is just not HOT when you make the emulsion. And if I remember correctly, since you are all about traditional/classical, isn't classic Hollandaise made with clarified butter, which is essentially oil?
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:20 AM   #33
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Its all about temperature. I work for a company that produces the #1 sold mayo in the US. I have heard the R&D guys say you can make mayo with motor oil. But from an egg standpoint with butter its all about temperature.

45F/63C -- Egg whites begin to thicken

150F/ 65C--Egg whites become a tender solid although ovomucin yolk cords will coagulate much higher. The yolk protein starts to thicken.

158F/70C-- Egg yolks set.

165F/73C-- Whole egg sets. If eggs are cooked at 212F for too long they get rubbery as proteins continue to coagulate and water is pushed out from between protein molecules.

So below 150 F you can make mayo about this you begin to get the base for Hollandaise sauce.

FYI - Salmonella is killed instantly at 165 F. So if the egg yokes don't see this temp there is no kill if the bacteria is present.
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:48 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Umm, mayo can be made with melted butter by itself or in combo with oil. The butter is just not HOT when you make the emulsion. And if I remember correctly, since you are all about traditional/classical, isn't classic Hollandaise made with clarified butter, which is essentially oil?
Clarified butter comes from a cow originally in the form of cream. All other oils come from plants. Big difference.
'Larousse Gastronomique': "Hollandaise sauce is the name of a hot sauce made with egg yolks and butter".
"Mayonnaise is a cold sauce which the basic ingredients are egg yolks and oil blended into an emulsion".
I've been home cooking and professionally cooking for over fifty years. I've never seen a recipe calling for the use of butter in a classic mayonnaise.
As someone mentioned you can make mayo and or Hollandaise from motor oil.
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Old 01-29-2016, 02:23 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Mayo is made using a oil like OO.
Hollandaise is made using butter. Hollandaise is considered one of the five 'mother sauces' in classic French cuisine.
Mayo is served chilled. Hollandaise is served warm.
There is a fundamental difference between the two.
Yes. I think we all know the difference.

My post (which you didn't quote) was actually a joke referring to uncooked egg yolks in mayonnaise.
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Old 01-29-2016, 03:20 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Clarified butter comes from a cow originally in the form of cream. All other oils come from plants. Big difference.
'Larousse Gastronomique': "Hollandaise sauce is the name of a hot sauce made with egg yolks and butter".
"Mayonnaise is a cold sauce which the basic ingredients are egg yolks and oil blended into an emulsion".
I've been home cooking and professionally cooking for over fifty years. I've never seen a recipe calling for the use of butter in a classic mayonnaise.
As someone mentioned you can make mayo and or Hollandaise from motor oil.
The point I was making is that clarified butter in COOKING techniques is essentially the same as oil.

Maybe you should widen your horizons. There are quite a few recipes using clarified butter either by itself or in combo with an oil to make mayo, including one that uses it after the butter has been browned, that look quite interesting.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:38 AM   #37
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When the CIA starts teaching it's students to use clarified butter in a classic mayo let me know.
I've seen/eaten culinary "horizons" across the world for 5 decades.
I'm making a classic Cambodian 'Lap Khmer' beef salad tonight.
IMO if someone wants to cook 'Classic' dishes from any part of the world one ought to stay as true to the original as possible.
Be it from France or Cambodia or Chile or wherever.
BTW. Anyone here like Gordon Ramsey? Think he's a fair to good chef?
When he decided to become a professional chef the first place he went to was France to learn 'Classic French cuisine.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:50 AM   #38
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I don't agree with the move to 'dumb-down' classic recipes that is becoming more prevalent in too many poor to mediocre American restaurants.
It amounts to plain laziness on the part of the chef and the kitchen staff and penny pinching by the owner. Truly excellent restaurants worldwide.......whatever the cuisine never cut corners.
For instance you will never find any Michelin star restaurant using butter cut with some form of plant based oil and passing it off as 'real butter'.
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Old 01-30-2016, 10:42 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
I don't agree with the move to 'dumb-down' classic recipes that is becoming more prevalent in too many poor to mediocre American restaurants.
It amounts to plain laziness on the part of the chef and the kitchen staff and penny pinching by the owner. Truly excellent restaurants worldwide.......whatever the cuisine never cut corners.
For instance you will never find any Michelin star restaurant using butter cut with some form of plant based oil and passing it off as 'real butter'.
I guess you don't approve of food exploration or experimentation. Of course, that's how those "classic" techniques were developed in the first place, but that thought seems to be lost on you.

Ya know, not everyone can be perfect like you. There are a lot more of us "common folks" out here than there are upper crust, and we need places to go out to eat where we can actually afford to pay the bill.
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Old 01-30-2016, 03:54 PM   #40
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I guess you don't approve of food exploration or experimentation. Of course, that's how those "classic" techniques were developed in the first place, but that thought seems to be lost on you.

Ya know, not everyone can be perfect like you. There are a lot more of us "common folks" out here than there are upper crust, and we need places to go out to eat where we can actually afford to pay the bill.
+1

And ....

There are some people who are on restricted diets or vegetarian/vegan who need to use other substituted ingredients. Are they not allowed to enjoy a dish because a different ingredient is used?
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