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Old 04-14-2005, 09:38 AM   #1
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Cool ISO Teriyaki Sauce Recipe

hi , is there any way i can make tereyaki sauce, at home , because i cannot find it in my near stores ???
i want to make tereyaki chicken i think i need it there , or can i use any other sausce instead of this. one.
bye

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Old 04-14-2005, 01:44 PM   #2
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Well the key ingredient to making teriyaki sauce is mirin, which is a thick and syrupy japanese cooking wine that is VERY sweet, but not in a sugar like way. When the alcohol from the mirin evaporates it leaves a shinny, sweet coat on the food. The problem is that if you are having a hard time finding teriyaki sauce you will probably have a hard time finding mirin.

If you cant find it then use some sake...

1/2 cup sake
5 tsp sugar
1/2 cup soy sauce

Edit: I was forgetting... heat up these ingredients together in a pan to make sure all the sugar disolves leaving things well mixed.

Ok... some more info... this is a bare bones Teriyaki sauce... in other words just basic. If you want to make it more interesting you can blend it with cloves of garlic, chunks of peeled ginger, red hot peppers and any thing else you like.

After that well it's a matter of soaking your meat or veggies in the sauce and grilling, frying or broiling them. Hope this helps!
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Old 04-14-2005, 06:42 PM   #3
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I looked up Teriyaki in several online sources to get a definition as Lugaru's explanation was one I'd never heard. He is correct however, and I learned something new.

The result of my search is that teriyaki means teri - glazed or shiny, yaki - broiled.

Traditionaly, it seems that a teriyaki marinade is a combination of soy sauce and mirin. I don't use alcohol in my home and substitue crushed pineapple and brown sugar for the sweet mirin wine. The definitions also stated that the soy sauce was highly seasoned, usually with garlic, ginger, and onion. But those ingredients are optional.

For my teryaki, I start with a little water and add lite soy sauce (Kikoman brand is what I prefer), Splenda, a bit of mollases, granulated garlic powder (it takes too long for fresh garlic to give up its flavor in the application, IMHO) chopped fresh onion, powdered ginger, crushed pineapple with lite syrup, and black pepper. I first add the pineapple and soy sauce to the water and taste until I get the flavor I want. I then add a little of the other ingredients, stirring and tasting as I go so as to keep a flavor ballance somewhere between sweet and savory. When the flavor is right, I add the meat and let marinate.

Meats that can be used with teriyaki include seafood such as shrimp, scallops, firm-fleshed fish, beef, pork, chicken, turkey, etc. After the food has marinated for a couple hours, the food is either grilled or broiled.

If I'm grilling, I'll often add hardwood to the charcoal and cover the grill, turning the whole thing into more of a barbecue. But this is trick if you are cooking small items such as shrimp. You don't want to overcook them.

The marinating liquid can be brushed onto the food as its cooking to enhance the flavor and further glaze it.

Hope this helps.

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Old 04-15-2005, 07:07 AM   #4
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Thankyou soo much for ur help guys............i cannot use alcohol ....... what do u say ???, bye
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Old 04-15-2005, 04:12 PM   #5
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Mirin does not contain alcohol or if it does, the amount is next to nil. You can buy mirin in the Asian section of most supermarkets next to the other ingredients. You won't find it next to the sake or any other alcohol, so don't worry if you're not of age to buy beer, wine, etc.

If you don't want to buy use mirin, a basic teriyaki base would be:


1 c. Soy Sauce
1 c. White Sugar
1/2 c. Water


Combine that in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer until the sugars dissolve and the sauce thickens slightly. If you're using mirin, use equal parts of that and soy sauce, and use the same cooking technique.

Once you master that, you can incorporate other ingredients such as:


Ginger
Garlic
Scallion
Citrus
Hoisin
Sesame
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Old 04-15-2005, 05:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
If you don't want to buy use mirin, a basic teriyaki base would be:


1 c. Soy Sauce
1 c. White Sugar
1/2 c. Water


Combine that in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer until the sugars dissolve and the sauce thickens slightly. If you're using mirin, use equal parts of that and soy sauce, and use the same cooking technique.

Once you master that, you can incorporate other ingredients such as:


Ginger
Garlic
Scallion
Citrus
Hoisin
Sesame
My personal teryiaki sauce is very similar, however, I use all of the above, except I use honey or molasses brown sugar (from Belguim), and fish sauce as well and sometimes add the zest of whatever citrus I am using (usually lemon or lime). Sometimes I use mirin or white vermouth, and sometimes substitute shallot, which I prefer, for the scallion
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