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Old 03-05-2007, 01:47 PM   #1
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Lasagna Sauce questions/problems

I'm making lasagna on the weekend for DH's bday. I'm making the sauce today and I'm trippling the batch because I'm making two pans of lasagna and we always like extra sauce.

#1. The recipe called for a 28 oz can of crushed tomatoes. I picked up three cans without realizing that one of the cans was tomato sauce not crushed tomatoes. I added it to the pan already, kind of noticing while pouring it in that there weren't any tomato chunks. Will it be ok?

#2. I also realized the recipe calls for Kosher salt and I have regular iodized salt and I have sea salt. Can I substitute the same amount or should I go out and buy the kosher salt?

Sher

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Old 03-05-2007, 01:56 PM   #2
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use sea salt, it`s exactly the same :)

Tomatoe sauce and a can of tomatoes is how I`de make mine anyway (I use V8 instead though), make your sauce and adjust it before you commit to construction anway, I think you`ll be Just Fine and he`ll love it :)
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:01 PM   #3
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The tomato sauce will be fine.

Do not run out and buy kosher salt. You don't need it.

IMO, I would use table salt. It's cheaper than sea salt. The subtle flavor differences in sea salt will be totally lost in a big vat of pasta sauce. But remember to use 1/3 less table salt than kosher salt. In other words, if the recipe says 1T of kosher salt, use 2/3 of a T. Or cut it in half and add more after you taste it.
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:14 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sherin65
I'm making lasagna on the weekend for DH's bday. I'm making the sauce today and I'm trippling the batch because I'm making two pans of lasagna and we always like extra sauce.

#1. The recipe called for a 28 oz can of crushed tomatoes. I picked up three cans without realizing that one of the cans was tomato sauce not crushed tomatoes. I added it to the pan already, kind of noticing while pouring it in that there weren't any tomato chunks. Will it be ok?

#2. I also realized the recipe calls for Kosher salt and I have regular iodized salt and I have sea salt. Can I substitute the same amount or should I go out and buy the kosher salt?

Sher
Sher, I would check the label for ingredients of the canned tomato sauce & crushed tomatoes, because most canned products/sauces already contain a huge amount of salt. You may not need any salt. If you have some fresh tomatoes, dice them and add to your sauce. I would squeeze out the seeds, as well.
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:27 PM   #5
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As for #1: Basically, only difference is that the sauce will not be as "chunky". Technically, "sauce" contains some herbs - but that shouldn't matter.

As for #2: Salt - use only 1/2 the amount of table salt as Kosher salt, you can always adjust it at the end (aka - add more to taste). Using sea salt, in my opinion, is a waste of good salt - the delicate flavors from the minerals in the sea water (which is what gives sea salt it's unique flavor) will be totally lost in a pot of sauce.

Picking up on what Mish said - don't add salt until you taste your sauce! Canned tomatoes contain salt, and different canners include different amounts of salt. Bring your sauce "to temp" and then taste - and only adjust the seasoning at the end of cooking "after" the sauce has reduced.
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:32 PM   #6
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Kosher salt IS sea salt, only prayers have been said over it or something, but for a Direct 1:1 conversion sea salt is the one to use.
with fine ground table salt you have to convert and work in terms of Mass rather than Volume.
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Old 03-05-2007, 02:48 PM   #7
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Kosher salt is salt mined from deposits, like table salt. It is not harvested directly from the sea, like most "sea salts" people have recently come to use.

But the salt in salt mines originated from sea water, so you can say that table salt = sea salt with equal authority.

All salt is 99.9% NaCl, so you can really use any food-grade salt. But sea salt almost always costs much more than table or kosher salt. IMO it's a waste of money to use it in an application where it's subtle flavor and/or crunch won't be appreciated.

And, like kosher salt, because sea salt comes in several different crystal sizes, it is not a 1:1 substitution for kosher salt in a recipe.
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Old 03-05-2007, 03:05 PM   #8
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the mean AVG is ~ 1:1 yes.
as I said when you get into Fine grains, you need to equate with Mass and Not Volume, a T spoon of one and a T spoon of the other will Not be the same.
and I`m surprised it`s more expensive also???
it`s roughly the same price here Kilo for Kilo.
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Old 03-05-2007, 03:35 PM   #9
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Sea salt that is harvested from the ocean is VERY expensive and really should not IMO be used for cooking. It's a finishing salt. That would be like using a $200 bottle of wine in your sauce.

Here in the states, there are less expensive sea salts meant more for cooking and table use, but because they are "sea salt," they generally command a premium -- certainly lots more $$ than table salt. Most of this kind of sea salt either fine grain or coarse grain and neither seems to me to be a 1:1 ratio to kosher salt -- particularly not the coarse grain. True the only way to accurately sub is to weigh the salt, but really who is going to bother to do that?

Because table salt and kosher salt comes in generally uniform size crystals, the commonly accepted ratio is 1 1/2 of Morton's Kosher salt to 1 of table salt and 2 of Diamond Crystal to 1 of table salt. Diamond Crystal brand has larger crystals.
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Old 03-05-2007, 03:45 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
True the only way to accurately sub is to weigh the salt, but really who is going to bother to do that?
ME


What!??? I`m a Scientist, that what we DO!
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