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Old 06-04-2015, 10:24 AM   #1
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Makin' Gravy

Yesterday during my mega shopping for the month, I ran into a lovely older southern lady.

She passed on a tip for making gravies. She said she takes flour and puts it in a cast iron skillet and places it in the oven at a low temperature until the flour gets to the color she likes to use and then keeps it in a container until she is ready to make gravy.

I didn't get any more information than that, but it soundedl like a great way to make gravy or even as a roux starter, so I thought I'd pass the idea along.

If I'm lucky enough to run into her again, I'll definitely try to get more details.

In the meantime, I'm going to try the idea out.

I love the idea of having "toasted" flour to make gravies and roux.
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:36 AM   #2
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I have heard of it, never tried it.

This is a pretty straight forward description of how to toast the flour.

Browned Flour Recipe | MyRecipes.com

Good luck!
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:54 AM   #3
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Question

Would this method be any better than mixing flour into the fat (after draining off the meat juices) and cooking it out until it darkens before adding the liquid?
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:15 AM   #4
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First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:32 AM   #5
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Great idea, Z! Will have to give it a try.
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:38 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
Would this method be any better than mixing flour into the fat (after draining off the meat juices) and cooking it out until it darkens before adding the liquid?
If you make it in advance, it saves some time when you go to make the gravy.

You can also make roux in advance and freeze it. Restaurants do that all the time.
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:41 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
Here in my part of the South, turkey and beef gravy made with a browned roux are not uncommon. By definition, white or milk gravy isn't made with browned flour, but that's not the only gravy Southerners make. See: Gumbo.
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
And in rebuttal I have know a lot of southern ladies that made brown gravy for their chicken fried steak. Why would I want a white gravy for a piece of beef?
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:54 AM   #9
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I've seen recipe for making a roux that start with browning the flour like this then mixing it with the oil and cooking it briefly. A simpler way to make a roux.
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Old 06-04-2015, 11:54 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
So are you saying all the recipes that have been posted in this forum are just crap? Considering that is such a broad statement, does that include all of the members of this forum?

I have been feeding a family for 60 years. They are all still alive and kicking. I do know what a stove is and I know enough to know the difference between the hardware store and a supermarket. I don't shop for food at a hardware store. I don't have any food left from my shopping forays at the supermarket 60 years ago. So I must have done something right. No one died from my cooking or even got sick.
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