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Old 05-17-2005, 02:10 PM   #11
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1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 medium onion, diced (about 3 tablespoons)
4 cloves garlic, sliced
3 (28-ounce) cans whole, peeled, tomatoes, roughly chopped
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 small bunch fresh basil, leaves chopped
2 teaspoons kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Saute the onion and garlic, stirring, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes with about half of their juices (discarding the rest), the herb sprigs and basil and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for about 25 to 30 minutes or until thickened.
Remove and discard the herb sprigs. Stir in the salt and season with pepper, to taste. Serve or store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
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Old 05-17-2005, 02:12 PM   #12
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I'd say it is probably for a big crowd, since most of bbq buddies cook for large groups.
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Old 07-25-2006, 04:30 PM   #13
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Sauce

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 medium onion, diced (about 3 tablespoons)
4 cloves garlic, sliced
3 (28-ounce) cans whole, peeled, tomatoes, roughly chopped
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 small bunch fresh basil, leaves chopped
2 teaspoons kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Saute the onion and garlic, stirring, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes with about half of their juices (discarding the rest), the herb sprigs and basil and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for about 25 to 30 minutes or until thickened.
Remove and discard the herb sprigs. Stir in the salt and season with pepper, to taste. Serve or store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
Was just wondering could this recipe be cooked in a crock pot ?
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Old 07-25-2006, 05:04 PM   #14
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No wine? I add wine to most of my meat sauces and always dry, white wine to my marinara.
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Old 07-25-2006, 05:10 PM   #15
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I like to use chicken broth with my marinara sauce.
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Old 09-23-2006, 06:35 PM   #16
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Nine Cups of Water!!! Whoa Momma!

Here is my copy/pasted marinara recipe based on the CIA's, Alton Brown's, and an Old Italian recipe I got from a friend who's mother's brother's sister's uncle's aunt (haha!) brought it over from the land of the ferrari...
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Marinara Sauce

I don't use fresh supermarket tomatoes, as they're usually picked green for their shipping durability, then reddened with ethylene gas. This changes their color, but the flavor of a tomato never develops off the vine. Good canned tomatoes are picked at the peak of their ripeness, and usually provide a better option for cooked dishes. Read the labels and opt for the brand which has the least amount of added sodium. Locally grown vine-ripened Roma tomatoes may be used, but you will need to peel, de-seed, and crush them yourself.

The wine in this recipe is essential, as tomatoes are one of those foods with certain flavor compounds that can only be released with alcohol. It also adds a subtle layer of "fruity" complexity to the sauce, and works well with the fruitiness of the extra virgin olive oil.

1/2-C Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Medium Onions - Finely Diced
8 Medium Cloves Garlic - Crushed & Minced
1-t Dried Thyme
1-t Dried Basil
1-t Dried Oregano
1-t Dried Marjoram
1-t Fresh Parsley (minced)
1/2-t Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1/4-t Dried Chili Flakes
2-T Tomato Paste
1/2-C Dry White Wine (Non-Oaky - eg. Sauvignon Blanc)
56-fl.oz. Crushed Tomatoes (Low Sodium)
1/4-C Fresh Basil Chiffonade
Adjust w/Kosher Salt & Sugar

In a 8-qt pot, sweat the onions in the olive oil over medium heat. When the onions have given up almost all their liquid and begin to caramelize, add the garlic, dried herbs, parsley, pepper, and chili flakes. Continue to cook until the garlic begins to turn golden and the herbs are very fragrant. Add the tomato paste and cook until it dissolves in the oil and yields a golden brown/red coloration. De-glaze the pan with the wine, add the tomatoes, bring to a simmer, then turn the heat to medium-low. Simmer/reduce the sauce uncovered until it's volume is reduced by roughly one-quarter to one-third (use a spatter-guard to keep the mess down, the high walls of an 8-qt pot also help). Add the fresh basil, and simmer for an additional five minutes.

Run the tomato sauce through a manual food-mill into another 8-qt pot, and reheat over medium-low heat, bringing the sauce back to a simmer (discard any remaining solids/fibrous material left in the food-mill). Adjust seasoning with kosher-salt and balance the acidity with sugar if necessary. This varies by the brand of tomatoes used, but I generally add 1/4 to 1/2-t Salt and 3 to 5-t Sugar.
You will notice I use both dry and fresh herbs. I think dry herbs bring up a background flavor without being as punchy as fresh herbs. I do like the punchy flavor of fresh basil though.

It's very important that you either leave this "rustic style" and don't process it, use a masher, or a manual food mill. Do not put this in a blender! Blending it introduces lots of air and the fibers create a graint texture when finely processed. Personally I feel the food mill works the best and it's what I use.

I freeze it in 1-Cup containers so I have sauce on demand. Of course you can make a zillion dishes with this. My favorite is a classic quick skillet sear/bake chicken parmesean with a few rigatoni or hunk of garlic bread. In the summer I really like it with some grilled white-fish and strips of zucchini. Of course tomater dishes go excellent with wine too, so it's almost a given that when I defrost a cup of sauce I pull out a bottle of wine from my rack. Of course it's also good just tossed with some penne rigate and showered with parm-reg & pecorino-rom. Ok thats enough.
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Old 09-24-2006, 12:40 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
sweat the onions in the olive oil over medium heat. When the onions have given up almost all their liquid and begin to caramelize, add the garlic, dried herbs, parsley, pepper, and chili flakes.
When making a traditional marinara, i would never take the onions to a caramelization stage, if they start to brown, its too late i my opinion... great detailed explanation of the process though
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Old 09-24-2006, 12:47 AM   #18
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Nick, you need to write a cookbook. You really have a way with words.
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Old 09-24-2006, 11:17 AM   #19
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Seven - Definetly! I don't brown the onions, but I cook them just long enough until they are a pale gold... kinda like the color of a good lager. It's not my style, but some people actually prefer to fully caramelize the onions... it's even recommended in the CIA's text. I like to reduce the water content in the onion to intensify it's flavor, and camamelize just a bit (as in pale gold) to develop a sweetness that helps balance some of the acidity of the tomatoes and wine. I've seen some people that just add them to the sauce (like crock-pot sauces), and I think they taste stringy and bland that way.
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jkath - Thanks! I'm terrible with English & grammar though...

I keep detailed instructions for myself in a 'puter folder so I won't forget small things. It also makes it easy to give out or eMail them. I really think it's lame when people won't share their kitchen discoveries. Like it's some big secret that no one has ever produced before...

Chances are, someone else has an even better recipe, or a tip that could improve the "holy recipe" even more!
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Old 09-24-2006, 01:39 PM   #20
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I agree with Nicholas about sharing.
I'm new around here. What is CIA?
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