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Old 03-13-2008, 04:19 PM   #31
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You know that if you google "classical italian pomodoro sauce" this thread is the top result? And it isn't even what one might consider a "classical" pomodoro, either. Hilarious.

Anyways, I was going to jump into the discussion about authentic versus not or whatever, but it all seems a bit academic to me. For anything to claim to be the one true authentic recipe would require two things: a) codification of a standard, b) agreement upon that standard by the majority of the profession. Classical French cooking has that in Careme and Escoffier. Where is Classical Italian food codified into a standard? Seriously, I have yet to find a definitive source for all things "authentic" Italian.
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Old 03-13-2008, 05:20 PM   #32
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Weeks - I sure hope this little, gosh, I'm not sure what to call it but I won't call it the Welcoming Committee , incident won't deter you from sharing any other recipes.

I sometimes put matchstick carrots in my spaghetti sauce - love the texture and taste.

I have put pumpkin in my chili so I can only assume the squash gives that same velvety smooth underlying texture/taste also.

Thanks for the recipe - MOST of us just read them and enjoy the personal spins put on them
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:26 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
In her book and reprinted here

Sometimes I use veal or even some pork with the beef.

WEEKS! Glad you popped back in!

thanks, jenny. copied and printed for a future attempt.



breezy, i never said it was authentic, but as weeks has just clarified, it wasn't intended to be presented as such, nor could it probably have been. that, my retentive friend, was my insistence.
(i happen to agree that pomodoro isn't much more than tomatoes, olive oil, and maybe a bit of herbs and/or something to cut acidity)


weeks, your grandma's recipe will be tried even sooner. i've been looking for a way to get a certain consistency with my smoother tomato sauces. thanks again.
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Old 03-14-2008, 09:49 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Weeks View Post
Anyways, I was going to jump into the discussion about authentic versus not or whatever, but it all seems a bit academic to me. For anything to claim to be the one true authentic recipe would require two things: a) codification of a standard, b) agreement upon that standard by the majority of the profession. Classical French cooking has that in Careme and Escoffier. Where is Classical Italian food codified into a standard? Seriously, I have yet to find a definitive source for all things "authentic" Italian.
Well, I have to disagree with that. I see no reason why "professionals" are the only ones who can weigh in on what a certain dish consists of.

If I say I'm making chicken piccata, people familiar with Italian cooking (unless they're Ryan on Top Chef ) will know that it's a chicken cutlet pan-fried with a pan sauce made with lemon and butter, or if I'm making veal marsala, they will know it's a pan-fried veal cutlet with a pan sauce made of mushrooms and marsala wine. That doesn't mean there can't be variations (broth and/or wine for the piccata, various kinds of mushrooms for the marsala, add capers or shallots or not), but if there was no standard, people wouldn't know what I meant when I mentioned those dishes.

I'm pretty sure that if I went to a bookstore and looked up recipes in five Italian cookbooks for pomodoro, piccata and marsala sauces, they would be very, very similar.
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Old 03-14-2008, 11:39 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Weeks View Post
Pomodoro (Italian for "Tomato") sauce is the mother sauce of about a half-dozen different Italian sauces. You can go from this recipe to any number of permutations on the standard American "spaghetti sauce", and it also makes a great base for old classical Italian sauces such as Puttanesca or Bolognese.

This is a crock pot recipe unless you have 4 hours to sit and babysit a stockpot full of sauce so it doesn't burn.

You will need:
6-8 cans diced tomatoes (or dice them yourself!)
1 tbsp crushed basil leaves
1 tbsp ground oregano
4 peeled carrots
4-6 cloves of garlic, minced
half of a red onion, minced
1/2 tbsp olive oil
1 bell pepper, small dice
1 butternut squash, small dice (no seeds!)
salt and fresh-ground pepper (just have some on hand)
1 can tomato paste....
Thank you for sharing your recipe, Weeks. I've prepared tomato sauce in the slow cooker/CP, and you are right, in that you don't have to babysit the sauce on the stove.

Here's the def of Pomodoro/Tomato sauce, as weeks explained
An Italian term for "tomato" which translates to "golden apple" referring to the first tomatoes grown that were golden yellow in color with an apple-like shape. Since tomatoes are such a large part of Italian cooking, pomodoro or pomodori (the plural form) is a common term used in reference to food dishes with tomatoes. As examples, pomodori al forno is a recipe for tomatoes with garlic, al pomodoro means "with tomato", pomodori secchi refers to sun-dried tomatoes, and pomodoro sauce refers to a tomato sauce.
Pomodoro: Cooking Terms: RecipeTips.com


If I may ask a few questions about the recipe...

What size can of tomatoes & do you drain the liquid?

1 tbl crushed basil leaves & 1 tbl ground oregano & 1/2 tsp olive oil? The ratio of dried & fresh have me a bit thrown off, & why only 1/2 tsp olive oil? When I make sauce in the sc/cp, I add 1/2 of the seasonings/fresh herbs (in larger quantity toward the end of cooking time). Just sharing my experience w the cp. What does the 1/2 tbl of olive oil add to the dish? (Not a challenge, here - just asking about the ingreds.)

Do you peel the squash & are you partial to Red onions?

IMO, folks have lost sight of the recipe, & are debating about about the name. When cooking w a sc/cp, I often add in ingredients I have on hand - and I think squash is a great idea -- and doesn't need to serve a purpose other than to add flavor! Thank you for sharing your recipe.
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Old 03-14-2008, 07:52 PM   #36
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Butternut squash? I have to agree with Constance here - even in my old-school Italian cookbooks or from my old-school Italian friends (some direct from the old country), butternut squash is not an ingredient in Italian gravy. Where'd you find that ingredient?
Yea, sorry, nothing personal but, the only thing that should be in sauce is basil, salt, and garlic. Now, if, when you cook you want to add a few things like mushrooms, or meat, or even.....yea, butternut squash, go for it.

When I cook my sauce I put Red Wine and suger, along with some sort of meat. If I am making meatballs, I cook them slow in the sauce. I cook the same way my grandmother cooked in Calabria, so this REALLY IS the "old world" style.
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Old 03-15-2008, 06:52 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by PastaKing View Post
Yea, sorry, nothing personal but, the only thing that should be in sauce is basil, salt, and garlic. Now, if, when you cook you want to add a few things like mushrooms, or meat, or even.....yea, butternut squash, go for it.

When I cook my sauce I put Red Wine and suger, along with some sort of meat. If I am making meatballs, I cook them slow in the sauce. I cook the same way my grandmother cooked in Calabria, so this REALLY IS the "old world" style.
mine only has onion/galic, salt, olive oil and tomatoes. my mum likes putting basil in hers, but dad doesn't particularly like it hehe, shes from Calabria too :)
and yeah meatballs....cooked long. I have never put sugar though..what does it do for the sauce? maybe i should try...

btw....ur not supposed to be eating pasta right?
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