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Old 03-17-2008, 06:58 PM   #11
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How are you making it? I have not ever had thickening problems with Alfredo, actually quite the opposite!!!
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Old 03-18-2008, 07:26 AM   #12
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1 cup of heavy whipping cream
1 and a half cups of grated cheese
1/4 cup of butter

Melt the butter
Add in heavy whipping cream and cheese and let simmer. Mabye im not letting it simmer long enough.
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Old 03-18-2008, 09:50 AM   #13
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one thought... what type of cheese are you using? How fine is it grated? You may want to try a different cheese or a coarser grate I am not really experienced cooking alfredo (just eating it) but I think the type/quality of the cheese will play a part in defining the texture.

I have to go with the purists on the nomenclature here... Alfredo does not include flour or eggs... then you are making Bechamel or something else yummy but it certainly is not Alfredo.
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Old 03-18-2008, 10:28 AM   #14
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Alfredo sauce by definition is made with Parmesan cheese. Preferably Parmagiano Reggiano. I don't think that has that much to do with the thickness of the sauce.

Little Italy, I suspect you are not allowing the sauce enough time to reduce. That is the way your sauce thickens.
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Old 03-18-2008, 11:11 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Alfredo sauce by definition is made with Parmesan cheese. Preferably Parmagiano Reggiano. I don't think that has that much to do with the thickness of the sauce.
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I have to disagree... my point was you will find many things called "Parmesan" which vary from little granules of tatstless fleck in a cardboard shaker to lovely chunks of Reggiano. they will melt differently and act differently in your sauce. Little Italy said "Grated Cheese" which can mean anything but I believe you will get a better texture to your alfredo if you used a quality cheese and hand grated it coarsley than if you use the pre-grated topping stuff.

In such a minimalist 3 ingredient sauce the ingredients matter tremendously.

What cream? What Cheese? What Butter? I would try one with all artisinal ingredients and one with generic processes supermarket ingredients and see what you get.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:00 PM   #16
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I am using mayfield heavy cream
The little shaker kroger brand parm cheese,not enough money to buy the real stuff. (college kid)
and country crocker margarine out of a tub
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:12 PM   #17
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I think I see the problem. By Kroger brand do you mean the stuff in the can? That stuff won't thicken as it really doesn't "melt" properly. And Country Crock is made out of a lot of water if my memory serves me well. Water will certainly destroy your Alfredo.

Cream, shredded Parm at least (and that can be bought in a tub), REAL butter, garlic, salt, and pepper. The other stuff just won't serve you well.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:15 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by PanchoHambre View Post
I have to disagree... my point was you will find many things called "Parmesan" which vary from little granules of tatstless fleck in a cardboard shaker to lovely chunks of Reggiano. they will melt differently and act differently in your sauce. Little Italy said "Grated Cheese" which can mean anything but I believe you will get a better texture to your alfredo if you used a quality cheese and hand grated it coarsley than if you use the pre-grated topping stuff.

In such a minimalist 3 ingredient sauce the ingredients matter tremendously.

What cream? What Cheese? What Butter? I would try one with all artisinal ingredients and one with generic processes supermarket ingredients and see what you get.

I agree about the taste/texture of the sauce, with cheaper drier stuff potentially making for a grainy texture (and obviously taste impact), but I still don't think the quality of the parmesan will have much affect on its ability to thicken. It thickens primarily because the liquid is boiled off.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:19 PM   #19
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I am using mayfield heavy cream
The little shaker kroger brand parm cheese,not enough money to buy the real stuff. (college kid)
and country crocker margarine out of a tub
Hey LI I remember the college days my friends and I did alot of cooking on budget ... somtimes things are tight still... but when you try alfredo again do yourself a favor and get some real cheese it dosent have to be expensive import parmigano reggiano just get a simple block domestic parmesan (supermarket brand is fine) and grate it yourself with the big hole part of the grater... or buy the pre grated kind that is larger pieces and sold in the little plastic containers.

Parmigano Reggiano is very expensive and amazingly tasty but for cooking you may actually be better of with a slightly softer domestic parmesan anyway becuase it will integrate better.

I generally cook with the softer stuff and reserve the Reggiano for appetisers on special occassions it is precious like gold.

Also use real BUTTER in place of the marg.... again regular supermarket butter is absolutley fine.

I think your texture and taste will improve.
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Old 03-18-2008, 02:22 PM   #20
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I think your texture and taste will improve.
I agree entirely with everything Panch just said.
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