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Old 12-09-2012, 04:08 PM   #21
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I only recently heard there was something called "red gravy" or sometimes "sunday gravy." I thought perhaps it was a regional thing. Sauce or gravy, either way, it's delicious. It's another opportunity to google something foodie. =o)
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:24 PM   #22
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I only recently heard there was something called "red gravy" or sometimes "sunday gravy." I thought perhaps it was a regional thing. Sauce or gravy, either way, it's delicious. It's another opportunity to google something foodie. =o)
For the average Non-Italian American, it is spagetti sauce. For an Italian family, it is Sunday gravy. Started early on Sunday morning, put on a very low simmer and everyone goes off to Sunday Mass. There is usually one member of the family that goes to six o'clock Mass in the morning. That person stays home and gives the pot a stir every so often while everyone else is at Mass. You can bet that person does not forget to stir. Not unless they want the wrath of the cook on their head all day. It is usually the male of the household who goes to early Mass. Because it is a short service. No sermon. And he has filled his religious obligation. Keeps the wife off his back.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:37 PM   #23
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As a somewhat OCD editor and former computer desktop support specialist, I have to disagree It's much easier to discuss things when we all use the same vocabulary as much as possible. Can't tell you how many times I was trying to troubleshoot a computer problem and people would say, well that's just what I like to call it. PITA.
I couldn't agree more... from the other side of course.
I can't tell you how many times I've described a problem to someone who plays dumb because I'm not versed in their field of work. A real pain in the butt. Like they don't understand layman's terms they probably grew up with
It's pretty much a form of belittling to make themselves seem more important IMO, but it has broadened my own vocabulary in other folks' line of work.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:48 PM   #24
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I do agree that computerese should be more standard, it is a young science. However, Cooking has been around since the dawn of time and many descriptions have been used for so long it's almost impossible to get a consensus on what to call a technique, etc.
What I meant is that computerese *is* more standard; it's just that many people who use them don't learn the proper names for things. And for some reason, many people think they know more than they actually do

I think standardizing terms and techniques is the reason Escoffier wrote his book and is why we have cooking schools now - they really haven't been around all that long. But their purpose is to standardize a curriculum so if a cook/chef goes from one place to another, whoever hires them can be confident they have a specific base of knowledge. That doesn't mean there won't always be exceptions and regional variations.

I guarantee you, though, if I were the editor of a cookbook or magazine, there would be standard definitions for it
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:51 PM   #25
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I couldn't agree more... from the other side of course.
I can't tell you how many times I've described a problem to someone who plays dumb because I'm not versed in their field of work. A real pain in the butt. Like they don't understand layman's terms they probably grew up with
It's pretty much a form of belittling to make themselves seem more important IMO, but it has broadened my own vocabulary in other folks' line of work.
I can see how it might seem that way from your side. From my side, though, when I was doing that kind of work, there might be days where I worked with five different people and they all called the same thing something different. So trying to figure out what they were talking about while trying not to make them feel dumb was challenging.
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Old 12-09-2012, 05:51 PM   #26
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I couldn't agree more... from the other side of course.
I can't tell you how many times I've described a problem to someone who plays dumb because I'm not versed in their field of work. A real pain in the butt. Like they don't understand layman's terms they probably grew up with
It's pretty much a form of belittling to make themselves seem more important IMO, but it has broadened my own vocabulary in other folks' line of work.
A sanitary engineer is still a trash collector. A very necessary occupation that is needed even without the fancy title.
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:37 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
What I meant is that computerese *is* more standard; it's just that many people who use them don't learn the proper names for things. And for some reason, many people think they know more than they actually do

I think standardizing terms and techniques is the reason Escoffier wrote his book and is why we have cooking schools now - they really haven't been around all that long. But their purpose is to standardize a curriculum so if a cook/chef goes from one place to another, whoever hires them can be confident they have a specific base of knowledge. That doesn't mean there won't always be exceptions and regional variations.

I guarantee you, though, if I were the editor of a cookbook or magazine, there would be standard definitions for it
Granted, professionals in the job SHOULD have a specific definition, the name of something consistent between languages, etc.

That's the beauty of this site, we are NOT all professionals in the Food Industry. We are cooks, chefs, nurses, computer techs, teachers, mechanics, housewives, bakers, house husbands, young, old, fulltime workers and retirees. We are also from around the globe or our parents and grandparents were. Sometimes we can see the differences are regional or generational...makes life fun and interesting.
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:42 PM   #28
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And then there's me and Paul Deen. We both say White Sauce. It's often regional. Whatever you call it, pass me some more.
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:59 PM   #29
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Granted, professionals in the job SHOULD have a specific definition, the name of something consistent between languages, etc.

That's the beauty of this site, we are NOT all professionals in the Food Industry. We are cooks, chefs, nurses, computer techs, teachers, mechanics, housewives, bakers, house husbands, young, old, fulltime workers and retirees. We are also from around the globe or our parents and grandparents were. Sometimes we can see the differences are regional or generational...makes life fun and interesting.
I agree - I didn't mean to imply we were all professionals. But part of learning about a topic involves learning its vocabulary. When new cooks come to the site asking what X means, I'm sure none of us would say, well, there's no consensus, so it doesn't matter what you call it. And I've said repeatedly that there will always be exceptions and variations. That doesn't mean there can be no definitions.

I really hope I'm not coming across in a negative way on this, and I don't think I'm expressing myself very well. I'll just blame it on the pain med and go watch TV for a while
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:08 PM   #30
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I agree - I didn't mean to imply we were all professionals. But part of learning about a topic involves learning its vocabulary. When new cooks come to the site asking what X means, I'm sure none of us would say, well, there's no consensus, so it doesn't matter what you call it. And I've said repeatedly that there will always be exceptions and variations. That doesn't mean there can be no definitions.

I really hope I'm not coming across in a negative way on this, and I don't think I'm expressing myself very well. I'll just blame it on the pain med and go watch TV for a while
You are not coming across as negative at all. Just a friendly discussion about how words are perceived. To my memory it was Kadesma that first used Red Gravy in a conversation and I was enchanted to find out what that was.

For me, tomato sauce is an ingredient for pasta sauces, etc. Red Gravy is a quaint description, regional and colloquial for a tomato based pasta sauce.

Like my Mom always said, "I don't care what you call me, just don't call me late for dinner."
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