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Old 04-10-2006, 02:32 PM   #1
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What is the difference between stock and broth?

What is the difference between a stock on a broth? Being a somewhat lazy cook I often substitute chicken broth for chicken stock and beef broth for beef stock.

I'm curious if I'm missing out on any flavors here though.

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Old 04-10-2006, 02:42 PM   #2
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Technically speaking, stock must contain bones in addition to any meat and seasonings. Broth is made from meat and seasonings without bones.

As a result, it is technically incorrect to refer to a vegetable broth as a vegetable stock.

However, the two terms are fast becoming interchangeable in the vernacular. The technical differences are becoming less important in general use.

That being said, stock will have a different texture and mouth feel as a result of the colagen extracted from the bones and connective tissues. A chilled stock will, in fact, have a semi solid, jell-o like consistency from the colagens.
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Old 04-10-2006, 03:25 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Technically speaking, stock must contain bones in addition to any meat and seasonings. Broth is made from meat and seasonings without bones.

As a result, it is technically incorrect to refer to a vegetable broth as a vegetable stock.

However, the two terms are fast becoming interchangeable in the vernacular. The technical differences are becoming less important in general use.

That being said, stock will have a different texture and mouth feel as a result of the colagen extracted from the bones and connective tissues. A chilled stock will, in fact, have a semi solid, jell-o like consistency from the colagens.
I just learned something new!!! I wondered why when I made beef or chicken stock that it jellied up after it was put in the fridge. Not so much with chicken than beef stock. Wow, amazing the stuff you learn!
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Old 04-10-2006, 03:28 PM   #4
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That gel is what you are looking for. The more gel you get the better.
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Old 04-10-2006, 04:14 PM   #5
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There are three terms that always confuse me: broth, consomme, and stock.

We make a lot of stock, and to us stock starts with bones.

The 'Food Lover's Companion' equates consomme with broth (although it does not state that one must use bones in stock).

Now my 'Escoffier Cook Book' gives recipes for consomme that use bones.

And I have seen folks put in a whole raw bird, bones and all, in the making of a broth.

I think the boundaries of these terms are rather fluid.

I suppose one has to figure out what one wants the broth, consomme, or stock to do, and then make it appropriately.

Everytime I think I have figured out some definitions, someone comes along with a recipe that challanges them.

But I guess that is what makes cooking fascinating, and fun.
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Old 04-10-2006, 04:16 PM   #6
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My understanding of consomme (and I could be wrong of course) is that it is stock OR broth that is clarified with egg white.
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Old 04-10-2006, 05:01 PM   #7
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I'm not sure whether the difinition of stock, as given here is correct. There are vegetable stocks that have no collagen in them. I will do some research and get back to you.

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Old 04-10-2006, 05:23 PM   #8
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This is a great site address that is somewhat long-winded, but gives an excellent entemology for stocks, broths, boulions, and soups.

http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsoups.html

In short, a stock is a liquor made by slowly simmering meat and meat bones in unseasoned water for the purpose of extracting nutrients and flavor. It is cooked for several hours, with careful skimming occuring frequently. It is also strained.

Theword came from stock, to set aside a useful amount of something, as stocking your pantry.

Broth comes from the same Germanic root as brew. It means to boil something. Typically, a broth is made by simmering, or boiling other ingredients in a stock. These ingredients can be meat, grain, vegetable, or a combination of these, along with seasonings, and salt. From broths, soups are made.

And I agree that the move collagen that a stock contains, the better it is. As I have said before, making stock is really quite simple. For instance, you can brown ground beef with a lid on to capture and condense the steam back into liquid. When the ground beef is done, pour the liquid into a suitable bowl and refrigerate. When it has cooled, it will have gelled from the collagen extracted (dissolved) from the ground up connecting tissue in the ground beef. The fat will have risen to the top, cooled, and hardened. Just remove that hardened fat and you have a delicious stock that can be used to make soups or aspics. And as for the ground beef, you have removed most of the fat, making it healthier. Just brown it a bit more to develop the proper flavor and color after draining the liquid.

I always purchase chicken with both the skin and bones. I remove the skin and bones and throw them in a pot with boiling water. By the time I'm finished preparing the chicken meat, the stock (after its been strained) goes into the fridge, just lime my hamburger stock. Again you get that great collagen and meat flavor, and the fat is hardened and easily removed.

Check out the address above for a more complete explanation.

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Old 04-10-2006, 05:24 PM   #9
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To Amend GeeBee. A consomme should ( though not nessisarilly) add ground shank meat with the mirepoix and the egg whites. this will make a chrystal clrear consomme.
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Old 04-13-2006, 04:00 PM   #10
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Consomme is clarified stock/broth. You make it by adding ground meat and egg whites (and sometimes tomatoes) to your stock and simmering it. The ground meat (you use chicken for chix stock, beef for beef stock, etc) and egg form a crust called a "raft" on top of the stock and attract the suspended particles of protein in the stock to it.

After some time, you carefully draw off the liquid which (if you did it right) will be very clear and rich tasting.
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