"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Sauces
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-17-2008, 12:50 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
The Parmesan that is easiest to find in US is that green stuff that comes in a can and is more closely related to sawdust than any cheese I've ever seen. Many folks use THAT in pesto.
OHHHH, I would never ruin a home made pesto with that junk!!!! And I agree, never use that stuff in your pesto! I'm not sure what it is good for honestly!
__________________

__________________
sattie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:07 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 38
thanks for the replies,

the production of parmesan involves animal products (rennet), that is why my question., what do you guys think.

can pesto be made of say mozarella :) or cottage cheese
__________________

__________________
cooking_guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:11 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,296
I would try mozarella before cottage cheese. You really need a cheese that will hold up in your pesto. Mozarella if used should be added at the very end and processed very lightly.
__________________
sattie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:16 PM   #14
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
It is the hard cheeses that tend to be used in pesto. I am not saying others can't be used, but mozarella or cottage cheese would not be cheeses I would think of when making pesto. Give it a shot though and see what you think. You may just come up with a new thing.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:18 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooking_guy View Post
thanks for the replies,

the production of parmesan involves animal products (rennet), that is why my question., what do you guys think.

can pesto be made of say mozarella :) or cottage cheese
No. neither will work. the cheese needs to be a hard, dry one, like those that I listed earlier.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:24 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
redkitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 3,200
I agree, those cheese won't work. My vegan cookbook suggests nutritional yeast in place of the cheese. It gives it an almost nutty cheesy flavor, I've used it in other recipes. You could also use no cheese and I'm sure it would still be tasty!
__________________
Accentuate the positives, medicate the negatives ~ Amy Sedaris
redkitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 02:09 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by redkitty View Post
I agree, those cheese won't work. My vegan cookbook suggests nutritional yeast in place of the cheese. It gives it an almost nutty cheesy flavor, I've used it in other recipes. You could also use no cheese and I'm sure it would still be tasty!
wow, another revolutionary thought gleaned from DC, I'm gonna try that one, maybe 1/2 nutritional yeast 1/2 parmesan cheese the first time around.

I can get a nice Wisconsin parmesan cheese in a 5 pound bag. Well, I just looked at the bag and it says it is imported.hmmmm. Anyway, if you look around you can find a decent parmesan cheese instead of the sawdust stuff in the green container.

Thanks rk for the nutritional yeast idea
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 02:51 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
The traditional cheese for Pesto Genovese is Pecorino, but it seems that in US pretty much anything goes. The Parmesan that is easiest to find in US is that green stuff that comes in a can and is more closely related to sawdust than any cheese I've ever seen. Many folks use THAT in pesto, but if you can find fresh Parmesan, the domestic varieties are better than that powdery stuff. or get whichever of the hard grating cheeses you can find. Each will change the flavor a bit, but the overall taste should still be wonderful...

Besides Pecorino, there's Parmigiano REggiano, Asiago, Grana Padano. You can also sometimes find some dry California Jack cheese that is fine, too.
LOL ~ the can may be green, or was, now it's in plastic, but the cheese is only green if you leave it out for a very, very long time
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 07:49 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 337
Hi cooking Guy,
For a pesto you need a hard Italian cheese like Parmiaggiano Reggiano, Pecorino or Gran Padano.
The traditional Pesto Genovese, to my knowledge contains basil, pine nuts, garlic, cheese as identified above, good olive oil and necessary seasoning although the cheese will add salt to the mixture so only a little pepper is necessary.

I have several cookery books which give different recipes for pesto in the sense of PESTO as a green sauce. Thus I have one by Ursula Ferrigno, who teaches and writes about Italian food, for mint pesto using mint in place of basil and another for lemon pesto which includes the juice and rind of lemons in the basil based pesto.

If one hunts through recipe books you may find basil being substituted for mint or parsley. I`ve used parsley very successfully in the past. Pine nuts may be substituted for almonds or walnuts. However, the cheese (Italian hard cheese), garlic and olive oil components are constants. It is worth experimenting with the different combinations as each has something to offer. That said, in a commercial situation one needs to ensure that the sauce is identified properly. Thus "Monkfish coated in Pesto Genovese (Basil and Pine nuts), wrapped in Parma Ham and roasted" will be a very different dish from "Roast Rack of Lamb with a Walnut and Parsley Pesto Crust" and needs to be identified as such so that customers can determine if it conforms to their taste or contains an ingredient to which they are allergic.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
__________________
archiduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 09:35 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
just a little history.... "Pesto" is the Italian word for "pounded." The traditional way to make "Pesto Genovese," (that luscious mixture of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts and grated cheese) is to pound the ingredients in a mortar with a pestle until the desired purée is attained. Thank goodness we have food processors to do that for us these days. Who has all that time??? But Pesto doesn't have to be made with the above ingredients, nor does it have to be green. It just has to be pounded to qualify. Only Pesto Genovese has to have the above ingredients.

Another tasty pesto is made with parsley, garlic and walnuts and CA Jack cheese.
__________________

__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.