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Old 02-03-2013, 04:54 AM   #21
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Here's yet another look at the Mother Sauces-- now with 7 categories.
( found at wiki. answers dot com) not sure the veracity of this website.
To me, this list looks as logical as five. We could go with 8, if sweet fruit sauces were included or 9 if… but I will slap my own typing fingers and focus with 5 – 6 - or 7. Mother Sauces.

Five hot:


1. hollandaise
2. bechamel
3. espagnole
4. veloute
5. tomato

Two cold:
1. mayonnaise
2. vinaigrette

I think this is a good topic and with the exception of Espagnole sauce, I can at least identify the words, and may know what direction I should take if I make one of them and even in which dish I might want to use or serve it with. When starting to look at the small sauces/ daughter sauces/ derivatives/ secondary sauces then it gets more complex and confusing. It seems they don't even know what to call themselves.

Regrettably at the moment I am unable to open GG’s study guide. ( personal computer issue, will use a different machine and read it). I guess learning about secondary sauces is a challenge and isn’t supposed to be easy. I have seen some of these in cookbooks or on restaurant menus. Usually skip over them as I don’t know anything about them, and find a different recipe or dish that is more familiar. Well, this is an opportunity to look at them with a different approach, and maybe even make one!
A good way to search is “sauces made from béchamel, veloute, etc

What is demi-glace, beurre-blanc, bordelaise or béarnaise, maitre d’ butter. Is the latter a liquid, such as a dipping sauce for lobster or a solid herbal butter pat to melt itself into a hot vegetable or steak topping. This is somewhat rhetorical, I can read and study terms and recipes. You may know some of the above, I suspect there are others you are unfamiliar as well.

I know little or next to nothing using wine, alcohol or beer in cooking. Over the years, this has fallen off my cooking vocab. I do make pretty good use of substitutes. Sometimes, there is no sub and including an alcohol can certainly enhance the overall flavor. I would like to pay more attention to this in making some sauces.

I go to a restaurant and order a steak. At the bottom of the menu it says, (usually for additional charge) you may add – béarnaise sauce, a horseradish sauce, wine or brandy peppercorn sauce, and maybe more choices.

Now, I think at this point I understand béarnaise may contain tarragon/ chervil. Is this a flavor I want with steak? . Having seen this on several menus, apparently I guess it’s worth trying. The horseradish is pretty straight-forward, it’s either plain, but it says Sauce, so it’s mixed with cream or sour cream and so on. Or they may ask if you would like a Steak Sauce. I know Heinz 57, A-1 and have seen several others. It’s best to Ask the server if they offer a House made steak sauce, what is it compared to --. Usually, I want my steak Plain, so I can taste the flavor of the meat. Today, for purposes of this discussion, Steak must be served with a Sauce. Mmm Steak.

So where do you think we go with discussion of the small sauces? Kadesma asked earlier “where to start”. Seriously, I think the answer is – with a spoon.
I am going to the store early next week. Enough time to find a new sauce, research and figure out all the details and make it. I guess that's how I am going to go about this.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:27 AM   #22
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I've tried making mother sauce but my mom refuses to get in the pot!
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:17 AM   #23
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lol!!!

hey, this isn't open mic night!
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:28 PM   #24
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lol!!!

hey, this isn't open mic night!
Sorry, forgot to drink my meds
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:30 PM   #25
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After that last mother sauce joke, my mind started going places it shouldn't. Dark humor comes to mind so quickly when you create nasty villains for your novels. I am so tempted. But I will resist. BT could get away with such comments, for he is our favorite rascal. But me, I'm supposed to be a nice guy. Whoa is the plight of the nice guy. Hey, wait! I throw virtual snowballs. I'm rascally too. Yay!

I typed it, then erased it. What goes on in the deep recesses of my brain shall forever be a mystery (Do not succumb to the power of the dark side, young Chief (young compared to a stone)).

OK, seriously now, another mother sauce derivative: Soubise Sauce
Ingredients:

1 lb onions, chopped
4 Tbsp butter
1 quart Béchamel sauce (see recipe below)

In a heavy sauce pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the chopped onion and reduce heat to low. Sweat the onion until tender, but not browned. When the onions are soft, place into a food processor with the butter, and pulse until smooth. Put the onion back into the pot, and whisk the Bechemel sauce into it to combine. If you have a stick blender, this would be a good time to use it.


As you probably ascertained, Soubise sauce is a Bechemel based onion sauce. It's great over all kinds of veggies, over oven-roasted potatoes, or ladled over a good hash. With a few additional ingredients, it can be used to make gravies and other sauces as well. It's uses are limited only by your imagination.



Can you imagine Soubise sauce mixed with chunks of saute'd beef, or cooked turkey breast, or even with a cup or two of frozen peas added to make a creamed pea side dish? I'm thinking that this simple sauce could make a great potato chowder, especially with some bacon added.


Well, you get the idea.


Basic Bechemel Sauce
Ingredients:
4 tbs. unsalted butter
4 tbs, AP flour
1/2 tsp, salt
2 dashes nutmeg
4 cups milk


Melt the butter over medium heat until liquid. Add the flour, salt, and nutmeg, all at once. Whisk together until a bubbling paste is made. Continue whisking the roux until it just starts to turn golden (Blonde). whisk in the milk until a creamy, smooth sauce is formed. Remove from the heat and pour into a suitable storage container. Place plastic wrap over the sauce so that touches the sauce surface. This prevents a "skin" from forming on top of the sauce. Refrigerate until ready to use.


Most recipes say that you need to add the milk before the roux starts to change color. Personally, I like the flavor of the blonde roux better than the white roux. But that's just me. In any case, your Bechemel is ready for whatever you need it for.



Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:10 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
After that last mother sauce joke, my mind started going places it shouldn't. Dark humor comes to mind so quickly when you create nasty villains for your novels. I am so tempted. But I will resist. BT could get away with such comments, for he is our favorite rascal. But me, I'm supposed to be a nice guy. Whoa is the plight of the nice guy. Hey, wait! I throw virtual snowballs. I'm rascally too. Yay!

I typed it, then erased it. What goes on in the deep recesses of my brain shall forever be a mystery (Do not succumb to the power of the dark side, young Chief (young compared to a stone)).

Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North


I'll admit my mind wonders into the "dark side" sometimes. Think I've been watching too much Sci Fi

To get back to the actual topic...
As much as I like tomato based sauces and bechamel, I prefer sour tastes so I would go with a vinegar or lemon based sauce.
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:24 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snip 13 View Post


I'll admit my mind wonders into the "dark side" sometimes. Think I've been watching too much Sci Fi

To get back to the actual topic...
As much as I like tomato based sauces and bechamel, I prefer sour tastes so I would go with a vinegar or lemon based sauce.
Examples and recipes are required. Give us a sauce, based on one of the Mothers. I'm sure that there must be a small sauce that's sour. If yu can't find one, or don't already have an example in your repertoire, then open another thread on the kinds of sauces you like. We'll letcha.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-04-2013, 12:59 AM   #28
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Yes Sir!

Since the sour sauces I make are not mother sauce based here are 3 of my most used sauces.....

Tomato based :

2 lbs of Isreali tomatoes or a mix of heirloom tomatoes. (seeded and skinned)
1 large onion finely chopped
splash of w/sauce
1 tbsp of paprika
3 cloves of roasted garlic or garlic puree.
2 red chillies finely chopped
1 tsp of dried oregano and 1 tsp of dried thyme
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste



Sautee the onion till translucent in a bit of olive oil, add garlic and chillies. Cook for about 5 mins on a low heat. Add tomatoes and all the other spices and w/sauce. Simmer gently for 30-40 mins. Season with salt and pepper.

Bechamel based: (cheese sauce)

2 tbsps of all purpose flour
2 tbsps of real butter
4 cups of whole milk
1 heaped teaspoon of hot english mustard
1 cup of finely grated sharp cheddar
1 tsp of onion powder
salt and white pepper to taste

Melt butter over a low heat, whisk in the flour, cook out for a few minutes, slowly whisk in the milk, add mustard and onion powder. Slowly whisk in the cheese. Season with salt and white pepper.

Veloute Based:

2 tbsps of all purpose flour
4 cups of chicken stock
1 large onion grated
1 carrot grated
2 sticks of celery finely chopped
Salt and pepper
Handful of chopped parsley
juice of one lemon

Over a gentle heat sautee the onion, carrot and celery in a bit of olive oil. Whisk in the flour, cook out for a few minutes. Slowly whisk in the stock. Pour in the lemon juice and add the parsley. Taste and add as much salt and pepper as desired.
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:29 AM   #29
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You can buy this treasure used from Amazon for about fifteen bucks. I make sauces from the recipes at least once a week. IMO there simply is not a better classic French sauce 'go-to' book than Escoffier.
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Old 02-04-2013, 01:10 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Here in the great land of DC, we occasionally dabble in sauces. But it seems we ignore the mother sauces, except Bechemel and Tomato. I never see a recipe for a Veloute, or Veloute derivitive, or an Espagnole, or Mayonnaise. Once in a while, we see an oil and vinegar based dressing.

So, do we often make others in the categorie, or even the small sauces? I occasionally will make a fume', which I believe is a type of Veloute'. I don't think I've made Espagnole or Demi-Glace. I occasionally also make my own mayo.

Which, if any, of these great Mother Sauces do you make, and what is your favorite, other than Bechemel?

My favorite is Veloute'.

I start with a blonde roux, made with salted butter and AP flour. To that, I add chicken, veal, pork, or fish broth to make a silky smooth sauce. This sauce is then used either as a gravy, or base for chowders, or bisques.

I don't know many small sauces for Veloute, but would love to learn some of them.

Maybe we need a topic just for Mother Sauces and the small sauces made from them. I suspect that most of us are lacking in knowledge of this flavor-rich group, and so don't have the option of dressing our foods to enhance them properly.

Also, there must be faster ways to make some of those that traditionally took many hours to prepare. Like for Espagnole, could the same flavor be achieved by cooking the bones for an hour or two in a pressure cooker, rather than ten to twelve hours in a kettle?

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief, why not Bechamel?

To be honest, personally I have not seen most of the Mother sauces on a menu or served in decades, i.e. asparagus in hollondaise, mornay etc. It might be a good starting point for wannabe chefs, but not what I cook with on an everyday basis, or keep in the freezer.

The more recent "sauces" in my experience are pesto (old hat now, but still used), chimichurri, mojito, foam and compound butters.
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