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Old 02-04-2013, 03:21 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
You can buy this treasure used from Amazon for about fifteen bucks. I make sauces from the recipes at least once a week. IMO there simply is not a better classic French sauce 'go-to' book than Escoffier.
You are probably right about that Puffin, Escoffier t is a great guide book and teaching resource.

Do you use the Escoffier as a resource, make recipes as stated, or as a guide and use ingredients on hand. I tend to fly more by the seat of my pants. This is one reason I appreciate this discussion. It is an attempt to learn more about classic sauces and to make them as intended. And to look for fun and reasonable ways to share what is learned within the group. Hopefully, it will make me sit up straight and fly right. Hope and wonder.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:29 PM   #32
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Mayo-- Aioli and Remoulade Sauces

Aioli This is a true child of mayonnaise. This is one basic recipe that is easy to make and I frequently use. Use as a sandwich spread, as a great dip for raw or grilled vegetables, as a dip for French fries/ chips or as a sauce for grilled fish and more. Today I made an aioli to be smeared on a toasted bun when I make pan fried burgers for National burger day. No 'taters in the house or it would be oven fries to go with.

To make aioli—
1 cup mayo, homemade or jarred
3 cloves garlic or more, to taste
2 tsp fresh lemon juice, a little zest
Salt / pepper.
Mince garlic very very finely or smash in a mortar/pestle. It's making this paste from the fresh garlic that gives aioli its intense flavor. Add the garlic to a small bowl, and whisk together with the rest of the ingredients. Cover, chill and allow flavors to blend.

Additions I have used, chopped capers, snipped fresh tarragon, green onion tops, Tabasco, a little Dijon mustard.

Additions worth trying, horseradish, minced chili pepper, other herbs, I think at some point this is no longer an aioli and tilts toward making a Remoulade sauce. I personally don’t consider this cheating until it surpasses the garlic flavor or multiple variants are included .

Remoulade. Escoffier writes:
“ To one pint of Mayonnaise add one large tablespoon of prepared mustard, another of gherkins, and yet another of chopped and pressed out capers, one tablespoon of fine herbs, parsley, chervil, and tarragon, all chopped and mixed, and a teaspoon of anchovy essence or a bit of anchovy paste. “
Wherever I read this, it has to be paraphrased, as it had several mis-spellings. The idea is central to Remoulade sauce. It makes no mention of garlic. Oops, I include when I have made this. I use Dijon, it says gherkins, cornichons, -- dill pickles are what I have and are acceptable. Not sweet pickles. Capers, yes, tarragon, I have grown chervil, I think it loses its flavor once dried, so no. I rarely have anchovies on hand, and I think sardines are a bit heavy to use. I don’t recall tasting this flavor either. It’s listed as an optional ingredient in the Joy of Cooking,

At home I make Perfect Fried Rubber Bands. If I go to a restaurant, on the Appetizer menu, they call them by their more familiar name—Calamari. I like these and it’s easy to share an order. One of the common dipping sauces offered is each place’s Remoulade. Up to today, this is confusing, and is often a surprise what they serve. The least best is no better than a commercial jarred tartar sauce. -- try to avoid. The real surprise is why is it sometimes white, yellow or red. After scoping out the net, it is easy to see, some places may not include or use dry mustard, or maybe they make a Danish Remoulade, yet another variation, is yellow and may include curry, and coriander. I will have to pay more attn the next time I am served this. Some places make a Creole (red) sauce. This has become as common in some settings as the classic French Remoulade. Both are valid sauces.

To make a classic Remoulade:
1 cup mayo
1 Tbsp finely chopped pickle
1 Tbsp rinsed chopped capers
1 Tbsp French mustard
1 Tbsp each tarragon and parsley
( chervil)
( 1 tsp or more smashed anchovy)
( 1 clove garlic, smashed) harrumph. I don’ t see this in any recipe, I put it in there.
Salt/ pepper to taste
Mix and chill.

To make a Creole Remoulade – this one is from Food dot com and looks representative of many. I have not made this type. It is good with Fried fish, crab cakes, calamari and as a vegetable or French fry dip
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup finely chopped scallion
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
1 stalk finely chopped celery
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon paprika
2 teaspoons hot sauce
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
Again, mix and chill. With a jar of Creole mustard and some Louisiana hot sauce on hand, one could combine the best of both kinds of Remoulade.
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Old 02-04-2013, 04:40 PM   #33
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did escoffier cover pesto and chimichurri?

and i thought a mojito was a drink, not a sauce.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:25 PM   #34
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From what I read, Hollandaise is the mother sauce. Mayonnaise is a derivative, as is aioli. And from the same source, the difference between mayonaise, and aioli is that the former is made with a neutral oil, while aioli is made with EVOO, and fresh garlic. Both have multiple recipes, and can be seasoned and flavored according to personal taste.

Often, a home-made flavored mayo is called an aioli, as it is a misconception that aioli is a flavored mayonnaise.

The following is one of my sources - Difference Between Aioli and Mayonnaise | Difference Between | Aioli vs Mayonnaise

Escoffier Online Recipe – Aiolo | Escoffier Online

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Old 02-04-2013, 09:23 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
did escoffier cover pesto and chimichurri?

and i thought a mojito was a drink, not a sauce.
Escoffier only wrote about traditional French cuisine. In culinary school, they referred to pesto, salsa, chutney, etc., as independent sauces. I think Cerise may have confused mojito and mojo, which is a Caribbean sauce made with garlic, olive oil and citrus.

I am really enjoying this thread Here's a remoulade I like to use with fish:

Ginger Remoulade

1 cup mayonnaise
2 tbsp. ketchup
2 tbsp. each minced celery, onion, fresh ginger and fresh parsley

Stir mayonnaise and ketchup to blend thoroughly. Stir in remaining ingredients. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour to allow flavors to meld. Serve with grilled or sauteed fish, or as a sandwich spread or salad dressing. Also great mixed with flaked cold fish or diced chicken served on crackers.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:36 PM   #36
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So, a Thousand Island Dressing is in the Remoulade family of sauces...

Funny how many of these sauces I learned from BH&G, they are just called something else and used in different ways.
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Old 02-05-2013, 09:08 AM   #37
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So, a Thousand Island Dressing is in the Remoulade family of sauces...

Funny how many of these sauces I learned from BH&G, they are just called something else and used in different ways.
Both french and russian dressings are examples of an emulsion sauce, and so would be considered, I think, small sauces from Hollandaise. I could be wrong on this though. They could be a part of the oil and vinegar, or vinaigarette sauces.

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Old 02-09-2013, 06:14 AM   #38
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A question about How To Thicken A Sauce

If you please. I think this is an essential part of making many types of sauces.

These are the ones I know -- Roux, Slurry and today, thanks to a Julia Child Beef Bourguignon video on the WFD 2/8/13 thread she demonstrates how to make and use Beurre manié. Other ways to thicken a sauce that I can think of are sauce reductions by simmering away some of the liquid, incorporating air by whipping cream or eggs, and possibly adding a portion of cream at the end of a sauce, or a dollop of butter and swirl it around.

My question is , why does one apply one technique vs another in making various sauces? Does one method vs another create a difference in taste?

In the Beef Bourguignon video why is a beurre manie’ vs a slurry used? My guess is to thicken without adding more liquid and it gets a smoother appearance. When I make stew, I start out shake the meat cubes in a seasoned flour, brown it, then add the liquid, cook/ bake/ simmer for a long time. It’s supposed to be self thickening ? this way. My stew is more often like Soup when done. Probably I add more liquid than a recipe recommends? Or ? I always make a Slurry at this point and stir stir stir it in until the sauce thickens, bring it back to a boil and reduce temp to finish.
In the case of making gravy, why use a roux vs a slurry. I have made a roux at the start of gravy making, with both fat in the pan and some juices/ browned bits and then added more liquid to make the gravy sauce. Eg biscuits and gravy. Mostly I use a slurry to add if there is quite a bit of liquid already in the pan, such as with a pot roast. Why not brown the meat, remove it to a platter as Julia did, make a roux in the pan, ( she poured off the oil after the meat is browned) before adding wine to de-glaze the pan VS leave the cooking oil in the pan, make a roux, then add the wine and stock and essentially already have a gravy for the meat to slow cook in the oven. ( I make baked swiss steak this way and both the meat and gravy get richer tasting). Seems easier. So why is this not the best method or even done except when making some casseroles. Beef Bourguignon is a casserole! and a stew !!

Here is the Julia Child Beef Bourguignon video again. She makes Beurre manié at the 22 minute mark. I think I am confused. Thanks for your thoughts/ comments.

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Old 02-09-2013, 11:34 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
A question about How To Thicken A Sauce

If you please. I think this is an essential part of making many types of sauces.

These are the ones I know -- Roux, Slurry and today, thanks to a Julia Child Beef Bourguignon video on the WFD 2/8/13 thread she demonstrates how to make and use Beurre manié. Other ways to thicken a sauce that I can think of are sauce reductions by simmering away some of the liquid, incorporating air by whipping cream or eggs, and possibly adding a portion of cream at the end of a sauce, or a dollop of butter and swirl it around.

My question is , why does one apply one technique vs another in making various sauces? Does one method vs another create a difference in taste?

In the Beef Bourguignon video why is a beurre manie’ vs a slurry used? My guess is to thicken without adding more liquid and it gets a smoother appearance. When I make stew, I start out shake the meat cubes in a seasoned flour, brown it, then add the liquid, cook/ bake/ simmer for a long time. It’s supposed to be self thickening ? this way. My stew is more often like Soup when done. Probably I add more liquid than a recipe recommends? Or ? I always make a Slurry at this point and stir stir stir it in until the sauce thickens, bring it back to a boil and reduce temp to finish.
Different methods can create different flavors, as well as different textures. Using beurre manie adds butter to the sauce, while a slurry adds water.

I've seen stew recipes where the vegetables are poured into a blender and pureed to make a sauce, then the dish is served with new vegetables. Often with a long-cooking stew, the veggies are so soft, they're not very appetizing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
In the case of making gravy, why use a roux vs a slurry. I have made a roux at the start of gravy making, with both fat in the pan and some juices/ browned bits and then added more liquid to make the gravy sauce. Eg biscuits and gravy. Mostly I use a slurry to add if there is quite a bit of liquid already in the pan, such as with a pot roast. Why not brown the meat, remove it to a platter as Julia did, make a roux in the pan, ( she poured off the oil after the meat is browned) before adding wine to de-glaze the pan VS leave the cooking oil in the pan, make a roux, then add the wine and stock and essentially already have a gravy for the meat to slow cook in the oven. ( I make baked swiss steak this way and both the meat and gravy get richer tasting). Seems easier. So why is this not the best method or even done except when making some casseroles. Beef Bourguignon is a casserole! and a stew !!
I think some of the liquid may evaporate during the long cooking time, unless the lid is airtight, so the sauce would be thicker than desired. Also, as the roast cooks, more browning on the bottom of the pan happens, so if you make the sauce after cooking, that can be incorporated into the sauce.

It seems to me that cooking a roast in a sauce vs. a combination of liquids would create a different end result; not sure which would be preferable since I've never tried it
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:32 PM   #40
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I tried the beurre manié for the first time yesterday. I liked the result. I will be using it again for stew type food. It is very hard to describe the difference between that sauce and the one made with a roux or by flouring the meat at the beginning.

Now, I'm not saying that roux or long cooked flour makes a "gloopy" sauce/gravy, but the one with the beurre manié was less "gloopy". It made more of a sauce than a gravy. It was still thick enough. You'll have to try it to find out what I'm talking about.

I agree with GG that if the thickener is added at the beginning, it might be the wrong amount and it probably does change the flavour.

Okay, maybe that's part of the difference. The flavours were more "clear", less muddy.
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