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Old 02-02-2013, 10:38 AM   #1
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What's Your Favorite Mother Sauce, Besides Bechamel?

Here in the great land of DC, we occasionally dabble in sauces. But it seems we ignore the mother sauces, except Bechemel and Tomato. I never see a recipe for a Veloute, or Veloute derivitive, or an Espagnole, or Mayonnaise. Once in a while, we see an oil and vinegar based dressing.

So, do we often make others in the categorie, or even the small sauces? I occasionally will make a fume', which I believe is a type of Veloute'. I don't think I've made Espagnole or Demi-Glace. I occasionally also make my own mayo.

Which, if any, of these great Mother Sauces do you make, and what is your favorite, other than Bechemel?

My favorite is Veloute'.

I start with a blonde roux, made with salted butter and AP flour. To that, I add chicken, veal, pork, or fish broth to make a silky smooth sauce. This sauce is then used either as a gravy, or base for chowders, or bisques.

I don't know many small sauces for Veloute, but would love to learn some of them.

Maybe we need a topic just for Mother Sauces and the small sauces made from them. I suspect that most of us are lacking in knowledge of this flavor-rich group, and so don't have the option of dressing our foods to enhance them properly.

Also, there must be faster ways to make some of those that traditionally took many hours to prepare. Like for Espagnole, could the same flavor be achieved by cooking the bones for an hour or two in a pressure cooker, rather than ten to twelve hours in a kettle?

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 02-02-2013, 11:14 AM   #2
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I've seen veloute sauces posted when people post roux-thickened gravies
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:20 AM   #3
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I don't have a culinary education so I have no idea the names of things. I'll have to google all these names to find out what they are! Then maybe I can tell you if I make them or not. (most likely not if I don't know what they are)
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:45 AM   #4
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Hi, Chief. Referring back to my culinary school book, fumet is a concentrated fish stock - it can be used to make a sauce, but is not itself a sauce. If you have 1 gallon of fish stock and reduce it to 1/2 gallon, you have 1/2 gallon of fish fumet.

I've only made espagnole and demi-glace while I was in cooking school. I made the beef stock and espagnole at home, and then demi-glace from those, so I could understand the entire process better. And it took two days I doubt I'll do it again. I can purchase a demi-glace sauce base for less than it cost to buy the beef bones.

Cooks' Illustrated recently published a recipe for steak sauces that used a lot of umami-rich ingredients to simulate a demi-glace in a couple of hours. I don't have it in front of me, but I believe it included mushrooms and tomato paste.

I do want to make a Sauce Raifort - bechamel simmered with white wine, freshly grated horseradish, heavy cream and cayenne - for a steak sauce. I just bought the fresh horseradish last week; I'll try to make it Tuesday.

I remember enjoying the Sauce Forestiere Blanc - a veloute derivative with minced white mushrooms (brown gills removed), mushroom essence and lemon juice.

Good topic, Chief
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:48 AM   #5
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i'm on the boring side, but my go to sauce is tomato. not the french version with various veggies, a roux, and bones, but the more simple italian one.

i'm not sure if that still qualifies it as a mother sauce.

in any case, you can put so many different things in tomato sauce and it makes them taste better. even my childhood dog would eat anything if it had tomato sauce on it. broccoli, carrots, cabbage, and so on. poor dog would fart like crazy after the latter, lol.
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:04 PM   #6
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BT - poor dog, or poor family?

Thumbing through my culinary school notebook, I found a handy handout - Sauce-Building Techniques Study Guide. I reorganized, rewrote and reformatted the handout - it sucked. But here it is. It's a teeny description (not recipes) of the mother sauces and popular derivatives. Hope it's helpful.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Sauce-Building Technique Study Guide.pdf (61.9 KB, 107 views)
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:10 PM   #7
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I make hollandaise on occasion. Mrs 40 C really likes eggs benedict, her favorite birthday breakfast.

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Old 02-02-2013, 12:32 PM   #8
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I basically make Italian tomato gravey. But I would love to learn the basic sauces and graveys mentioned here. I love cooking it seems to bring me peace so if anyone wants to begin my education I'd love to learn. Just tell me where to start.
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:39 PM   #9
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My go-to freezer staples are Espagnole, demi-glace, and glace du viande. I make them up every few months and freeze them in smaller quantities. I start with a huge pot of beef/veal stock. Turn about 2/3 of it into Espagnole, then a bout half of that into demi. It really is a weekend-long project. I reduce the balance of the base stock to a glace, and it takes up much less freezer space. The possibilities are limitless when you have mother sauces in the freezer.

A favorite is Sauce Robert - mustard & Espagnole. Add a spoonful of capers for an extra punch.

I also frequently make Hollandaise or variations thereof. I originally learned to do it over direct heat, so it makes up very quickly and without a lot of fuss - which is a good thing, since you can't freeze it.

It's interesting that you started this by saying 'except Bechamel'. That and tomato sauce are the ones that I rarely make!

I make a Sauce Supreme from the Veloute. Enrich your Veloute with cream. It's especially good when using it for chicken.
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Hi, Chief. Referring back to my culinary school book, fumet is a concentrated fish stock - it can be used to make a sauce, but is not itself a sauce. If you have 1 gallon of fish stock and reduce it to 1/2 gallon, you have 1/2 gallon of fish fumet.

I've only made espagnole and demi-glace while I was in cooking school. I made the beef stock and espagnole at home, and then demi-glace from those, so I could understand the entire process better. And it took two days I doubt I'll do it again. I can purchase a demi-glace sauce base for less than it cost to buy the beef bones.

Cooks' Illustrated recently published a recipe for steak sauces that used a lot of umami-rich ingredients to simulate a demi-glace in a couple of hours. I don't have it in front of me, but I believe it included mushrooms and tomato paste.

I do want to make a Sauce Raifort - bechamel simmered with white wine, freshly grated horseradish, heavy cream and cayenne - for a steak sauce. I just bought the fresh horseradish last week; I'll try to make it Tuesday.

I remember enjoying the Sauce Forestiere Blanc - a veloute derivative with minced white mushrooms (brown gills removed), mushroom essence and lemon juice.

Good topic, Chief
A meat processor, whose processing establishment is about 20 miles or so from my home, gives away beef bones, if you ask for them. My neighbor used to race sled dogs, and regularly got bones from this processor. He gave me about 20 lbs. worth one day last summer, as he had too much for his dogs. The bones still had meat on them, and were fresh.

If you look around, you will find that many small farmers who raise and slaughter, and sell their own livestock, often just toss the bones, as few people want them anymore, and they don't have a large enough stock of them to sell to the large companies that use them for dog food and such. They often sell the bones for very cheap.

I just read about a lady in New York who has created a company that uses the cast-off bones from organic farmers who sell their product at farmer's markets, and makes sauces from them, including chicken, pork, beef, and lamb. She then cans the sauces and gives some back to the farmers, who sell them at market, and sells the rest herself to people who appreciate real stocks and broths.

I know that I'll be hitting up that meat processor for every kind of bone he will give me, including venison and bison.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind fo the North
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