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Old 08-15-2007, 12:57 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by bullseye
I know that many recipes for this kind of sauce call for red wine, but I have had much better success with a sweet white or rose. I think the sweetness counteracts the acidity, while the usually drier reds just exacerbate it.
I also prefer white wine for the majority of my tomato sauces. It brings out a better flavor in the tomato and is more balanced. A red wine can also muddle the flavors and just not make the end result taste as good vs. a white wine. I also use chicken stock in my tomato sauces. It gives the sauce a savory characteristic that no one can figure out how I got, but the end result is delicious.
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Old 08-15-2007, 01:13 AM   #22
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and see, for me, I am the same way. When I think of pairing a wine with a food, veggies= a white varietal. I have maybe 2, or 3 uses for red when a veg sauce is made.

As for the herbs, dry=start with, fresh=finish. Just my $.02
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Old 08-15-2007, 01:25 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
I also prefer white wine for the majority of my tomato sauces. It brings out a better flavor in the tomato and is more balanced. A red wine can also muddle the flavors and just not make the end result taste as good vs. a white wine. I also use chicken stock in my tomato sauces. It gives the sauce a savory characteristic that no one can figure out how I got, but the end result is delicious.
Chicken stock, eh? One of the many Ironchef tips I think I must try. Thank you again, IC.
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:02 AM   #24
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With fresh herbs, i usually finish cooking the sauce, then take it off the heat, then stir in the herbs.
For the bitterness of the sauce: Taste it, after cooking. If it is bitter, then stirr in a little honey or sugar, then taste again and then add more sugar if necessary.
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:01 AM   #25
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I also agree on the wine issue. Give me a nice white wine. I don't really have a good palate for red wine.
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:13 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by bullseye
Chicken stock, eh? One of the many Ironchef tips I think I must try. Thank you again, IC.
Just add it in at the same time as the white wine (I usually go 2:1, wine to chicken stock) and let it simmer and thicken, maybe 15-20 minutes. From when I saute the onions until when the sauce is ready takes about maybe 25-30 minutes tops. You always see recipes that people simmer their tomato sauces for like an hour or more but I don't see the point of that. The only pasta sauce that I cook for that long that I can think of off hand is a bolognese or similar type ragout sauce.
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:27 AM   #27
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and see, for me, I am the same way. When I think of pairing a wine with a food, veggies= a white varietal. I have maybe 2, or 3 uses for red when a veg sauce is made.

As for the herbs, dry=start with, fresh=finish. Just my $.02
Hey, when did you become a mod?

Yeah, red wine and vegetables don't usually go well together. But a beurre rouge will pair well with most, if not all vegetables. With all that butter, why wouldn't it...
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