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Old 12-18-2016, 03:32 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Andy, my new one has an easy clean feature. Basically you spray the interior with water and allow it to steam clean. Only works on small messes. Something I had figured out already, I did not buy this stove for the easy clean feature.
Oh ok, So a bit more of a gimmick than a worth while feature then would you say?
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Old 12-18-2016, 03:33 PM   #12
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Is that the same stuff they put on automobiles to protect the finish?
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Old 12-18-2016, 08:17 PM   #13
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I just meant the bit about having a self clean 1 for 40 - 50 years, I didn't know they had been out that long, is it a feature worth having?...

Self-cleaning ovens were introduced in 1963.

Absolutely worth having! When you consider the alternative is to get down on your knees and apply, then remove, thick coats of hazardous chemicals that cause you to cough and gasp for air, just flipping a switch is heavenly.
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Old 12-18-2016, 11:46 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Self-cleaning ovens were introduced in 1963.

Absolutely worth having! When you consider the alternative is to get down on your knees and apply, then remove, thick coats of hazardous chemicals that cause you to cough and gasp for air, just flipping a switch is heavenly.
+1!
...
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Old 12-19-2016, 01:46 AM   #15
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I prefer to have an oven with a self-cleaning setting. Basically, as I understand how it works, it has been about since the sixties and just runs the oven at a very high temperature and pulverizes everything to ash. Most ovens with a self-clean also have a locking feature, as they have to cool down slowly otherwise you will crack the steel on on the oven.

I will say EVERY TIME I have used this I am nervous, it takes several hours, and I wouldn't use it in an unattended apartment. I watch it like a hawk, take everything out of the boiler plate drawer below, clean as much out as I can first etc...

However, it is better than getting in there with steel wool, rubber gloves and oven cleaner. It is not a cure all.

So Cooker Man? OK you mention nano, which is cool, and a new technology, I'd want to know how it works, why, and what the limits are. One of the reasons? Darn Teflon.

This was supposed to be THE miracle material, nothing stuck to it. Now I'd say it is sprayed a lot on lower quality aluminium pans. I haven't had ANY teflon pan that can get close to the non-stick of my lodge cast iron pan. Now mine is well seasoned, but there is a hydrophobic coating on that from interactions of iron, hydrocarbons, and water at high heat that makes a teflon pan look like garbage, and the teflon scratches, you can't use a metal spatula, it sublimes, and gets into your food. Have you ever seen a twenty year old teflon pan?

So a nano coating? OK would it wear off, would it sublime into the thing being cooked, nano is small, it is a thin coating, if it is damaged in part, would it be damaged in whole? What is the base on, aluminum? heats up quick but has hot spots, and is uneven, copper? corrodes with acid based sauces, iron? why not use cast iron, titanium? great can we afford it? Stainless steel, a good middle ground, they call it stainless because it is tough to get things to react to it, can you get a nano coating to stick?

I mainly use cast iron lodge products, I have a carbon steel wok, which was a pain in the arse to get conditioned, but now is performing well. I use all clad aluminium sauce pans, they are solidly constructed to give a good heat profile. I have a couple enameled pieces that I use in the oven. My perfect pan on gas and electric burner is a seasoned lodge cast iron pan. The only reason these aren't used in restaurants regular is that they have a curve, it takes a while for them to get to temperature, and a while for them to cool off as they retain heat. While this is a benefit for a home cook, a restaurant line wants timely control over temperature, so they go to stainless or aluminim.

I think if we are talking a coating, my main thing is durability. It might be the best thing ever for 10 uses, but pans get used. Scraped with spatulas, heated up to 450 and quickly cooled to room temperature. That was the problem with Teflon coatings, they gave a slight better than a poorly seasoned cast iron or carbon steel skillet, but the coating would degrade rapidly under heavy use.

I gave up the last of my teflon coated 'non-stick' pots and pans in my last move. Stopped using them, they were all jacked up, and I am in the process of trying to replace all my plastic spatulas, spoons, etc, which all are burned and melted a bit, with decent alternatives for decent pots and pans.

Things sticking to the pan are more often technique than materiel. My lodge 12" skillet is so seasoned right now, I could dump a cup of distilled water on it, shake it thrice, and it would be dry enough I could run a kleenex over it and it would be dry. A good seasoned cast iron is quite hydrophobic.
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Old 12-19-2016, 04:57 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I prefer to have an oven with a self-cleaning setting. Basically, as I understand how it works, it has been about since the sixties and just runs the oven at a very high temperature and pulverizes everything to ash. Most ovens with a self-clean also have a locking feature, as they have to cool down slowly otherwise you will crack the steel on on the oven.

I will say EVERY TIME I have used this I am nervous, it takes several hours, and I wouldn't use it in an unattended apartment. I watch it like a hawk, take everything out of the boiler plate drawer below, clean as much out as I can first etc...

However, it is better than getting in there with steel wool, rubber gloves and oven cleaner. It is not a cure all.

So Cooker Man? OK you mention nano, which is cool, and a new technology, I'd want to know how it works, why, and what the limits are. One of the reasons? Darn Teflon.

This was supposed to be THE miracle material, nothing stuck to it. Now I'd say it is sprayed a lot on lower quality aluminium pans. I haven't had ANY teflon pan that can get close to the non-stick of my lodge cast iron pan. Now mine is well seasoned, but there is a hydrophobic coating on that from interactions of iron, hydrocarbons, and water at high heat that makes a teflon pan look like garbage, and the teflon scratches, you can't use a metal spatula, it sublimes, and gets into your food. Have you ever seen a twenty year old teflon pan?

So a nano coating? OK would it wear off, would it sublime into the thing being cooked, nano is small, it is a thin coating, if it is damaged in part, would it be damaged in whole? What is the base on, aluminum? heats up quick but has hot spots, and is uneven, copper? corrodes with acid based sauces, iron? why not use cast iron, titanium? great can we afford it? Stainless steel, a good middle ground, they call it stainless because it is tough to get things to react to it, can you get a nano coating to stick?

I mainly use cast iron lodge products, I have a carbon steel wok, which was a pain in the arse to get conditioned, but now is performing well. I use all clad aluminium sauce pans, they are solidly constructed to give a good heat profile. I have a couple enameled pieces that I use in the oven. My perfect pan on gas and electric burner is a seasoned lodge cast iron pan. The only reason these aren't used in restaurants regular is that they have a curve, it takes a while for them to get to temperature, and a while for them to cool off as they retain heat. While this is a benefit for a home cook, a restaurant line wants timely control over temperature, so they go to stainless or aluminim.

I think if we are talking a coating, my main thing is durability. It might be the best thing ever for 10 uses, but pans get used. Scraped with spatulas, heated up to 450 and quickly cooled to room temperature. That was the problem with Teflon coatings, they gave a slight better than a poorly seasoned cast iron or carbon steel skillet, but the coating would degrade rapidly under heavy use.

I gave up the last of my teflon coated 'non-stick' pots and pans in my last move. Stopped using them, they were all jacked up, and I am in the process of trying to replace all my plastic spatulas, spoons, etc, which all are burned and melted a bit, with decent alternatives for decent pots and pans.

Things sticking to the pan are more often technique than materiel. My lodge 12" skillet is so seasoned right now, I could dump a cup of distilled water on it, shake it thrice, and it would be dry enough I could run a kleenex over it and it would be dry. A good seasoned cast iron is quite hydrophobic.
Thank you for your indepth reply, I will respond fully soon, just wanted to send a quick reply so as not to be rude.
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Old 12-19-2016, 05:20 PM   #17
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The self-cleaning setting is great for making pizza.
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Old 12-19-2016, 05:34 PM   #18
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A more specific question

Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
The self-cleaning setting is great for making pizza.

Hm. I would have never thought of that, but you're right. Doesn't it get up to around 500? Sort of like a woodburning oven.
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Old 12-19-2016, 05:49 PM   #19
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The self-cleaning setting is great for making pizza.
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Hm. I would have never thought of that, but you're right. Doesn't it get up to around 500? Sort of like a woodburning oven.
NO!

The self-cleaning cycle raises the temperature to 900F and locks the oven door shut until the temperature drops to a safe level (around 500F). You'd have to put the pizza in before the oven heated up to 900 then leave it in there until it cooled down. I think the pizza would be ash by then and your entire home would be filled with smoke.

...but that's just my opinion.
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Old 12-19-2016, 05:53 PM   #20
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NO!



The self-cleaning cycle raises the temperature to 900F and locks the oven door shut until the temperature drops to a safe level (around 500F). You'd have to put the pizza in before the oven heated up to 900 then leave it in there until it cooled down. I think the pizza would be ash by then and your entire home would be filled with smoke.



...but that's just my opinion.

OK, backpedaling. It is probably NOT a good idea then.
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