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Old 10-17-2016, 01:44 PM   #21
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We make our pesto with mortar and pestle to get the best result - it's what most people do, and it doesn't take very long, so we usually make it fresh to use at the most within the week. Put into a sterile jar with a layer of olive oil on the top, and it keeps very well in a kitchen cupboard. We make mixed vegetables and other things in the same way, or in wine vinegar, and it works very well, stored in a cool place. Bottling is a favourite way of preserving garden produce here, it's part of the culture. Even in the towns and cities, the supermarket shelves stock lots of bottled items, as they reckon it has better keeping properties than freezing, and the food isn't affected structurally as it can be when frozen. I'm perfectly happy to be proven wrong, but that's what we do over here.

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Old 10-17-2016, 05:28 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
We make our pesto with mortar and pestle to get the best result - it's what most people do, and it doesn't take very long, so we usually make it fresh to use at the most within the week. Put into a sterile jar with a layer of olive oil on the top, and it keeps very well in a kitchen cupboard. We make mixed vegetables and other things in the same way, or in wine vinegar, and it works very well, stored in a cool place. Bottling is a favourite way of preserving garden produce here, it's part of the culture. Even in the towns and cities, the supermarket shelves stock lots of bottled items, as they reckon it has better keeping properties than freezing, and the food isn't affected structurally as it can be when frozen. I'm perfectly happy to be proven wrong, but that's what we do over here.

di reston


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The garlic and basil make storing your pesto with a layer of oil in a cupboard a botulism risk.

It needs to be refrigerated and used within 2 weeks.
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Old 10-17-2016, 08:40 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
The garlic and basil make storing your pesto with a layer of oil in a cupboard a botulism risk.

It needs to be refrigerated and used within 2 weeks.
+1..
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:28 AM   #24
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Smile Best way to store pesto in the freezer

Hi Folks!

I was curious to find out how they store pesto in Italy, so I contacted my friends on it.hobby.cucina, and, as ever they, were magnificently helpful:

This is what Mardot posted:

Hi, from a scientific point of view, I can't think of a sensible answer, but from a point of view of quality I can!

It's true, we Italians, especially where I come from, Liguria (or the Italian Riviera and the home of all pesto's) keep our pesto in the fridge for a while. But 'for a while' for me is no more than 2 weeks at the very most.
If you keep your pesto in the fridge for more than a month, you will notice a significant difference in flavour (even sooner than a month). So it's true, you're better off freezing it if you mean to keep it for any length of time. That applies only if it's a shop-bought pesto.

Homemade is different. You're better off doing it this way: get you're fresh basil, in bulk, when it's in season, chop it fine, and mix in a top quality light and fruity style of olive oil of the type we make in Liguria. Just freeze that. You can get the other ingredients any time, so you're better buying those as and when you need them, then make up your pesto. Job's a good 'un and there's far less risk of toxins developing.

Now that, to me, makes sense!

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Old 10-18-2016, 09:46 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
Hi Folks!

I was curious to find out how they store pesto in Italy, so I contacted my friends on it.hobby.cucina, and, as ever they, were magnificently helpful:

This is what Mardot posted:

Hi, from a scientific point of view, I can't think of a sensible answer, but from a point of view of quality I can!

It's true, we Italians, especially where I come from, Liguria (or the Italian Riviera and the home of all pesto's) keep our pesto in the fridge for a while. But 'for a while' for me is no more than 2 weeks at the very most.
If you keep your pesto in the fridge for more than a month, you will notice a significant difference in flavour (even sooner than a month). So it's true, you're better off freezing it if you mean to keep it for any length of time. That applies only if it's a shop-bought pesto.

Homemade is different. You're better off doing it this way: get you're fresh basil, in bulk, when it's in season, chop it fine, and mix in a top quality light and fruity style of olive oil of the type we make in Liguria. Just freeze that. You can get the other ingredients any time, so you're better buying those as and when you need them, then make up your pesto. Job's a good 'un and there's far less risk of toxins developing.

Now that, to me, makes sense!
It does to me, too. And it's easier than making several batches of pesto at once. I'm going to do that to most of the rest of my garden basil. It's starting to get leggy.
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