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Old 01-02-2018, 04:00 PM   #1
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Carbon Steel Pan Help Needed

I recently bought a couple of Matfer Bourgeat carbon steel pans. I've owned cast iron for many years, and I read up on carbon steel, too.

I seasoned my pans to a nice dark brown, and cooked some bacon in them as a trial cook. No problems. I spent several hours seasoning the pans in five steps, with thin coatings of flaxseed oil.

On bacon day, I decided to make a bacon sandwich. I cooked my bacon, put the pan aside while I made my sandwich and ate it. Later, I cleaned it by putiing some plain tap water, no soap, in the pan. I heated the water, and used a soft brush to clean the pan.

The seasoning very clearly did not properly bond to the steel, because it pealed off. I've never seen that before with my cast iron.

Any ideas what happened? Suggestions for next steps.

CD

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Old 01-02-2018, 04:08 PM   #2
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I have to ask the most obvious question... are you 100% certain you got ALL the lacquer coating off the pan before you seasoned it? Because that's what it looks like to me.

That lacquer can be a bear to get off.
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Old 01-02-2018, 04:12 PM   #3
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I have to ask the most obvious question... are you 100% certain you got ALL the lacquer coating off the pan before you seasoned it? Because that's what it looks like to me.

That lacquer can be a bear to get off.
That's a possibility. I followed instructions and scrubbed it long and hard. I was expecting a wax coating, but the actual coating was something harder than wax.

CD
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Old 01-02-2018, 04:22 PM   #4
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I would just give it a good scrubbing again, and basically start over. Steel wool works great, and the slight scuffing of the surface will also help the seasoning adhere.

The other thing I've seen go wrong with seasoning is applying too much oil at once. If you do that, it won't bond with the surface properly. To season my pans, I do it completely on the stove top. Get them screaming hot, and then put like two or three drops of oil into the pan and rub it in with a paper towel until it looks like there's not any oil on it at all. Then back on the burner until it starts to smoke. Turn off the burner and walk away for about an hour before applying the second coat. Repeat this process twice more.

I apply no more than three coats before I start using the pan.

By the way, this is one of my two DeBuyers. It's without a doubt the butt-ugliest pan in my kitchen, but it creates an awesome sear. I can also cook something as delicate as an omelette without anything sticking.

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Old 01-02-2018, 05:04 PM   #5
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I seasoned mine the same way, but with two more steps. I only used a few drops of oil, and wiped it almost dry with a paper towel.

CD
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Old 01-02-2018, 11:06 PM   #6
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I seasoned mine the same way, but with two more steps. I only used a few drops of oil, and wiped it almost dry with a paper towel.

CD
I'm sure you did it right. I still think it's probably an issue with not getting all the lacquer off. Especially seeing how cleanly the seasoning peeled away from the pan. Many years ago, I had a carbon steel wok that did something similar. I just gave it a good going over with a copper pot scrubber, and re-seasoned it.
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Old 01-02-2018, 11:27 PM   #7
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Thanks Steve. I didn't realize it would be shipped with a lacquer coating -- or anything beyond wax, although It sure seemed harder than wax when I cleaned it.

CD
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Old 01-09-2018, 06:54 PM   #8
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Let me start by saying Iíve never owned a carbon steel pan. By thought of the other posters thoughts of some Possible lacquer left on it makes sense.

The part that struck me is opís opening post of using flaxseed oil, from what Iíve read and heard with using it on cast iron is it is known to flake off and ready doesnít adhere as well as a good fat or vegetable oil over time.

The flaxseed oil will give you a quick slick cooking surface but seems to lack holding up to the old tried and true old school way.

I may be off base on this, if so please disregard.
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Old 01-09-2018, 08:14 PM   #9
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Let me start by saying Iíve never owned a carbon steel pan. By thought of the other posters thoughts of some Possible lacquer left on it makes sense.

The part that struck me is opís opening post of using flaxseed oil, from what Iíve read and heard with using it on cast iron is it is known to flake off and ready doesnít adhere as well as a good fat or vegetable oil over time.

The flaxseed oil will give you a quick slick cooking surface but seems to lack holding up to the old tried and true old school way.

I may be off base on this, if so please disregard.
I've never used flaxseed oil on cast iron, but all the research I did seemed to favor flaxseed oil for carbon steel.

I'm going with the lacquer thing, for now, but thanks for your input. I'll keep it in the back of my head (where it will probably get lost) if the lacquer thing doesn't "pan out" (pardon the pun).

CD
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