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Old 03-24-2008, 01:32 PM   #21
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I have two lodge pans, both pre seasoned. One was bought four years ago, which I think I did something to the coating, that it is flaking..the other pan is pretty good, almost non stick. I generally was the pans in hot water, wipe them dry, heat them up, then apply pam or oil on the pans.
Does any one know how I can stop the old pan from flaking..and re season it.
thanks
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Old 03-24-2008, 02:18 PM   #22
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I think you want to remove all of the "pre seasoning" and re-season the pan from scratch. I am not sure how well that "flaking" seasoning is on there. The general methods for stripping cast iron should apply these usually involve either the self clean cycle of your oven or some combination of lye(or oven cleaner) and elbow grease. It is pretty hard to hurt your pan so dont worry.

Once you remove all the flaky stuff you should re-season with crisco or lard or your preference of fats.
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:29 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
One reason the old cast irons work better is because they were made better to begin with. The new Chinese ones are not as smooth inside as the old one.

I wash my pans with soap, dry them on the stove burner, and rub a little oil in each time.
Exactly what I do. Also, don't bother with the Lodge cast iron grill pans, they stink.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:53 PM   #24
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The easiest way I've found to remove grime, or old seasoning from cast iron is by taking your pan/s, placing them into a large plastic bag (yard cleanup type bag), along with a glass cerial bowl filled with amonia. Tie the end of the bag closed and let everything sit outside for twenty-four hours or so. The old carbon and grease will pretty much wipe right off. Wash with ordinary soap and water to remove anything that's still on the pan and re-season imediately.

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Old 03-24-2008, 07:38 PM   #25
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Check the country of origin...Out sourced iron from abroad tends to be very rough. That could explain what you are seeing...Buy new or old lines of American made iron if possible.
UB, what I was seeing was an intentional texturing of the surface. The texturing was very similar to a basketball. I'm pretty sure it was a Lodge iron pan.

Far as buying more iron, I have 20+ pieces in the kitchen and around twice that in storage. Right about now I'm looking for the rare and exceptional.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:25 PM   #26
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I just put a coating of oil on the pan and put it in the oven for a few days, Every time I use the oven, I wipe on more oil and then just leave it in for the ride.

I am also a washer.
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Old 04-03-2008, 02:00 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Wart View Post
UB, what I was seeing was an intentional texturing of the surface. The texturing was very similar to a basketball. I'm pretty sure it was a Lodge iron pan.
ick I picked up (meaning handled not bought) a new "martha stewart" CI skillet at the store the other day to inspect this "new" cast iron and yep it had a really gross rough texture. I had never paid close attention before all the CI around had always been older.

The surface of an old wagner or griswold piece is smooth even after years of neglect. The difference in quality between a vintage and new is very apparent.

It is claimed that the new CI will perform fine with enough seasoning but I dont really care to find out.
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Old 04-03-2008, 02:40 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by PanchoHambre View Post
ick I picked up (meaning handled not bought) a new "martha stewart" CI skillet at the store the other day to inspect this "new" cast iron and yep it had a really gross rough texture. I had never paid close attention before all the CI around had always been older.

The surface of an old wagner or griswold piece is smooth even after years of neglect. The difference in quality between a vintage and new is very apparent.

It is claimed that the new CI will perform fine with enough seasoning but I dont really care to find out.
The new Made In USA (Lodge) CI will and does perform fine. It is the out sourced Made In China products that have issues...

Fun!
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:00 PM   #29
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I must respectfully disagree about the new Lodge. I have several old CI pieces and 3 newer Lodge. The Lodge has the sand cast bumps on the interior, and, for me, the pans are difficult to season and difficult clean as the surface is too irregular. I like the interior surface of the old cookware much better.
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Old 04-03-2008, 04:01 PM   #30
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I must respectfully disagree about the new Lodge. I have several old CI pieces and 3 newer Lodge. The Lodge has the sand cast bumps on the interior, and, for me, the pans are difficult to season and difficult clean as the surface is too irregular. I like the interior surface of the old cookware much better.
Obviously you cannot compare old iron to new(er) iron. In time, and with proper seasoning/use the Lodge will be just as smooth.

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