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Old 02-19-2014, 05:23 PM   #11
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This may be a stupid question, but was it ever a good pan or is it one you found and are attempting to clean. I have seen many inexpensive imported CI pans that have such a rough surface they will never be any good.

I would wash it, dry it, put about a half inch of oil in it, heat it, peel and slice a potato, cook up a batch of french fries, wipe it out when it cools.

Stay away from the lye unless you know what you are doing, it is very dangerous and it does not care what it eats!
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Old 02-19-2014, 07:03 PM   #12
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What do you suggest for stripping the old seasoning?
And yes, it used to be a decent pan.

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Stay away from the lye unless you know what you are doing, it is very dangerous and it does not care what it eats!
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Old 02-19-2014, 07:09 PM   #13
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Icor, wait. wait, wait! You don't need any lye. Just fill it with water and some vineagar, boil for a few minutes and start the seasoning process. NO LYE!
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Old 02-19-2014, 07:20 PM   #14
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Watch and see if this video helps.

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Old 02-19-2014, 08:26 PM   #15
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Just reseasoned an old dutch oven I found in my parent's shed. Skipped the electrolysis as it seemed to only have surface rust; my husband used a wire brush on a drill to get all the rust and old seasoning off.

Coated it with peanut oil and left it in a low oven (200) for about three hours. Sticky. Recoated with Crisco and left that sucker in there for a week on the bottom rack while I cooked as normal on the top rack. If I estimate, probably around 4-5 hours around 350 or so, with all the heating up and cooling down included.

It was still slightly sticky, gave it a good rinse with plain hot water, sauted onions and braised some pork chops in it. No sticking of the food, rinsed out easily and it's still coming along nicely. I'd like it to blacken up and get a bit smoother, but I'm happy with the progress.

At least from my experience with reseasoning old cast iron - and I've done it a lot, I have a pretty good collection - time and use just makes it better. I have tried all the oil combos you can think of, and the only thing I can really recommend is to use an oil that can take high heat and use at least two different types while seasoning, like peanut, lard, bacon or Crisco.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:26 PM   #16
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I think that high heat is turning the oil you're using into a sticky gummed-up mess. I've never heard of that method to season a cast iron skillet. I can't figure out the lye method either, or the grinding wheel for that matter.
Maybe it's time to try Salt and Pepper's method just for the fun of it.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:30 PM   #17
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Do not expect eggs to not stick after just a few rounds of seasoning. Eggs are one of the things that stick the most and seasoning does not work right away. You should season at least once before cooking anything and then after the initial seasoning start slowly by cooking foods with a high fat content (like bacon) a number of times. The more you cook foods like that the more it will reinforce your initial seasoning. Eventually, and you will know when, you will start to see and feel a chance in the pan and will be able to cook things with less fat.
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Old 02-20-2014, 05:22 PM   #18
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When you consider the repeated time and money you spent on electricity, doesn't it almost start to approach the price of a brand new Lodge preseasoned skillet?
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Old 02-20-2014, 09:40 PM   #19
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When you consider the repeated time and money you spent on electricity, doesn't it almost start to approach the price of a brand new Lodge preseasoned skillet?
That would depend on the pan. If I were to happen upon a neglected Griswold, or older Wagner CI pan, I would say that restoring it would be the thing to do, as those pans were so well made. The new, preseasoned Lodge pan is well made too, but is substantially heavier, and not finished nearly as well. The cooking surface is very grainy on Lodge pans, while very smooth on the Griswold and Wagner pans.

I have to admit though, that properly seasoned, each brand has it's high and low points. but isn't it that way with everything?

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Old 02-21-2014, 05:53 AM   #20
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That would depend on the pan. If I were to happen upon a neglected Griswold, or older Wagner CI pan, I would say that restoring it would be the thing to do, as those pans were so well made. The new, preseasoned Lodge pan is well made too, but is substantially heavier, and not finished nearly as well. The cooking surface is very grainy on Lodge pans, while very smooth on the Griswold and Wagner pans.

I have to admit though, that properly seasoned, each brand has it's high and low points. but isn't it that way with everything?

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I agree!

Some of my old CI pans are smooth as glass, virtually nonstick, others need a little more experience.
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