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Old 02-24-2014, 05:03 PM   #31
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If I'm not usig bacon fat to fry eggs, I use butter.
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Old 02-24-2014, 05:13 PM   #32
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I'm gonna try heating up the skillet slowly, maybe that's why the eggs stuck some.

I'm also tempted to start saving my bacon grease, storing it in the fridge and using THAT for frying my eggs instead of Crisco (when I'm frying eggs with no bacon).
The speed at which you get the pan up to temp does not matter. The food can't tell the difference.

Absolutely save your bacon grease. Your taste buds will thank you.
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Old 02-24-2014, 05:19 PM   #33
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I have a preseasoned Lodge skillet that does well when I cook eggs after I've cooked bacon. I pour out the excess bacon grease and eggs don't stick at all.

However, when I take a good dab of Crisco and melt it in the skillet and cook the eggs, they stick some. I'm wondering why. I'm thinking that I heated the skillet too high too quickly. I didn't get it frying hot tho. I'm gonna try heating up the skillet slowly, maybe that's why the eggs stuck some.

I'm also tempted to start saving my bacon grease, storing it in the fridge and using THAT for frying my eggs instead of Crisco (when I'm frying eggs with no bacon).
Bacon fat is healthier, and tastes better than Crisco. Lard has no transfats, if it's not hydrogenated, and less saturated fat than butter. It's fairly mono unsaturated fats as well. And deep frying in it gives you far superior results to veggie oils. Your fried chicken will have more crunch. Your french fries will snap.

Bacon fat is lard with the smokey pork flavor of bacon. How can one resist such a thing?

Lard was portrayed as evil incarnate by advertising campaigns by Crisco. It was in their best interest. It made them money.

So what are you going to trust in your gut, something made by nature, or something created by people back in the 40's and fifties, when practically nothing was known about nutrition?

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Old 02-24-2014, 07:14 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post

Bacon fat is healthier, and tastes better than Crisco. Lard has no transfats, if it's not hydrogenated, and less saturated fat than butter. It's fairly mono unsaturated fats as well. And deep frying in it gives you far superior results to veggie oils. Your fried chicken will have more crunch. Your french fries will snap.

Bacon fat is lard with the smokey pork flavor of bacon. How can one resist such a thing?

Lard was portrayed as evil incarnate by advertising campaigns by Crisco. It was in their best interest. It made them money.

So what are you going to trust in your gut, something made by nature, or something created by people back in the 40's and fifties, when practically nothing was known about nutrition?

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Yes, yes, yes! Pork fat rules!

I keep a jar of bacon fat in the fridge that we use, mostly, for frying breakfast potatoes, and a jar of rendered pork fat that I get from simmering pork-shoulder trimmings when I make posole, etc.
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Old 02-24-2014, 11:41 PM   #35
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Properly seasoned CI pan... 1 egg, no Oil, no butter, no fat,... no Stick!
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Old 02-25-2014, 06:07 PM   #36
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Properly seasoned CI pan... 1 egg, no Oil, no butter, no fat,... no Stick!
Pan - $15 at a garage sale
Egg - $0.28 at the grocers
Durability - greater than a cockroach during a nuclear attack.
Ease of cooking and cleaning - priceless!

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Old 02-26-2014, 12:36 AM   #37
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OK, I had to try this with my 4 month old 8" preseasoned Lodge pan which has been reseasoned, no oil.
The egg came up in one piece with just a little residue in the pan. That residue came off easy in the sink. I guess it's not totally non-stick yet. Preseasoned Lodge pans aren't as smooth as I would like, they have that slightly rough texture from the factory which I'm not crazy about.
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:15 AM   #38
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Speaking of the Lodge CI pans .. if one were inclined to sand/grind/polish the inner to be smooth, what would you recommend? just go at it with a wire wheel & drill? or sanding disc? those pumice stone things?
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:43 AM   #39
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Speaking of the Lodge CI pans .. if one were inclined to sand/grind/polish the inner to be smooth, what would you recommend? just go at it with a wire wheel & drill? or sanding disc? those pumice stone things?
If one were inclined, you could use a disk sander, with wet emery cloth to do the job. But there really is no need.l Over time, and with use, that seasoning will fill in the valleys between the bumps, rendering the cooking surface smooth. At least that is what has happened with my own Lodge pans.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-26-2014, 09:48 AM   #40
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Speaking from personal experience, there is no need to do any smoothing to Lodge pans. I have two Lodge Logic pans I use regularly and they both cook eggs without sticking. I can slide the eggs onto a plate with no issue.

If you feel you must make the pan smoother, you will have to re-season. And if that's the case, don't buy pre-seasoned CI. You should have some skill with power tools so you don't mess up the surface.
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