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Old 09-25-2007, 02:18 PM   #1
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Convection Oven - Chuck Roast?

Hey guys for some reason my manual got lost in the move and i have no idea how to use my maytag convection oven to cook up this chuck roast braise im making.

I normally cook top round roasts weighing 1.5-2lbs. This is a chuck roast weighing betwen 3-4 lbs.

First of all how do i adjust the cooking time and temp to a convection oven?

secondly...Is it even worth it? I don't want to screw it up, as money is short right now.

Roasts for me have been in general very hard to mess up, which is why i'd like this to be my intro to using my oven's convection setting.

Im just going to brown the meat, throw in my liquid, throw on the lid, and throw it in a low temp oven until the meat falls off the bone.

Any reco's on time and temp, whether it be convection or conventional oven, would be appreciated, as im used to smaller roasts.

cheers

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Old 09-25-2007, 02:52 PM   #2
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300F for 3-4 hours. Looking for an internal temperature of around 200-210DF.

Convection will make little difference as the meat is in a covered pot.
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Old 09-25-2007, 03:18 PM   #3
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cheers andy
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Old 09-25-2007, 04:38 PM   #4
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LegsBig, I have a convection feature on my oven but I haven't had much luck using it when roasting meat. It's awesome for baking and pizza and that sort of thing but the only roast I tried to cook in the oven using convection came out very badly. (I did it uncovered and didn't know to turn the temp down and reduce cooking time when using convection). Anyway, do try using it for baking and you'll like it very much!
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Old 09-25-2007, 07:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
300F for 3-4 hours. Looking for an internal temperature of around 200-210DF.

Convection will make little difference as the meat is in a covered pot.
Andy,

I don't understand your suggestion of an internal temp of 200-210 degrees F.

I always thought that a temp of 180 to 185 degrees F. would yield a well done roast. Extending cooking at this temp would also tenderize the meat over time. I would be afraid that the meat may become too dry at your recommendation, especially in a convection oven where dry hot air is circulating and drying the surface of the roast more so than in a conventional oven.

I agree with you about the cooking pot. I always prepare pot roasts in a covered pan to keep the moisture contained within the roast.

This is just how I do it. I know that there are as many ways to cook a roast as there are grandmothers.
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Old 09-25-2007, 10:18 PM   #6
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Aurora, this is a pot roast in a pot with a lif on it. The air circulating in the oven will never touch the meat.

I think this will yield a tender roast.
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Old 09-25-2007, 10:25 PM   #7
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My GE Profile convection oven has a feature called "convection roast" - I have roasted beef and pork roasts successfully - very very tender - including cross rib roasts which have a reputuation for being tough. I have also used this feature for chickens and turkey, again, extremely juicy. I usually start my beef or pork roast at 450-475 degrees for 15-20 minutes then drop it to 350 degrees until the temperature registers done (different for each type of meat). My manual said to roast on the bottom rack-which I do, and put the meat on a broiler tray which I don't do because I don't have one. Every one of my roasts was done uncovered. They usually all cook very fast, too. The outside is always nicely browned and crisped while the inside is very moist and tender and juicy. I always let the meat sit for a while after I take it out of the oven too.

I hope it turned out good for you.
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:48 AM   #8
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Hey guys - I cook pizzas in my oven all the time.

I had a feeling that this convection feature would benefit stuff such as this, especially after Andy's assertion

Let's say the directions on my pizza say 400 Degrees for 20 minutes. ( frozen pizza)

How would i adjust this? Is there a formula or is it task specific?

Cheers.
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Old 09-27-2007, 01:27 AM   #9
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Hey, a question I can answer!!! You do frozen pizzas several ways. If you have a thin crust pizza, don't preheat. Set it for 400, turn on the convection and set your timer for a couple of minutes less than allotted on the package. If it's a fairly plain pizza - not a supreme - it could be done by then but for sure within the time specified on the package.

If it's a loaded pizza, I usually pre-heat at 25 - 50 degrees less than specified on the package. Then set your timer for maybe 3-5 minutes less than on the package and check it. It may need the full time but it may not. The thing to remember is to check things early because they can burn fast. And different brands respond a little differently. But the convection melts the cheese so nicely and evenly. I usually sprinkle on some extra mozzarella before baking if it's one of the really cheap pizzas my teens like so when I see the cheese is all melted and gooey, I pull it out.
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Old 09-27-2007, 09:23 AM   #10
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My oven will automatically convert whatever you program in "convection" to 25 degrees lower and the manual suggests that you cook it less time. So your pizza would be at 375 degrees and I would check it in 10 minutes and then again at 15. I have found that the pizzas cook very very fast! Also, my manual discusses rack placement for different things - roasts on the bottom rack, baking stuff on the third to middle rack - you may want to run through your manual for information purposes. What kind of convection oven do you have?
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