"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-22-2012, 01:03 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I started using oven safe glass for all meat dishes about 35 years ago. I noticed that dirt accumulated in the creases of loaf pans. I had to use a pointy steak knife or poultry skewer to get it out. Ewww. So I switched to glass. But, it means I can't put the glass roasting pans on the burner (as it says to do in many recipes) to deglaze the pan. I have to rely on the leftover heat in the pan.

Nowadays there are lots of pans that don't have creases in the corner, so maybe I'll try stainless steel. I have one large, SS, lasagna pan, but the sides are so high that it doesn't work well for roasting meat. That sort of put me off SS for roasting meat.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 01:43 PM   #32
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,392
i often use a large ovenproof skillet for roasting. Of course that depends on the size of the roast and the pans available.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 02:05 PM   #33
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
i often use a large ovenproof skillet for roasting. Of course that depends on the size of the roast and the pans available.
I'll have to remember that. I have enamelled cast iron pots that would work.

Does anyone know if a wooden handle would be safe in the oven? Would I risk charring it?
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 02:35 PM   #34
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I'll have to remember that. I have enamelled cast iron pots that would work.

Does anyone know if a wooden handle would be safe in the oven? Would I risk charring it?

I use a 12" CI skillet for small roasts and whole chickens.

Wood handles are usually safe at 350 F but may darken in color (not charring).
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 02:56 PM   #35
Sous Chef
 
no mayonnaise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 553
I don't understand the desire to use glassware for actual cooking anyway, minus things like a double boiler, where the insulative properties of glass can be beneficial. Ceramic seems to have the advantage, especially when covering cast iron.

Also, the link in the OP seems to be broken.
__________________
no mayonnaise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 03:07 PM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,893
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I use a 12" CI skillet for small roasts and whole chickens.

Wood handles are usually safe at 350 F but may darken in color (not charring).
Thanks. I really will have to remember to do that.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 04:39 PM   #37
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
I don't understand the desire to use glassware for actual cooking anyway, minus things like a double boiler, where the insulative properties of glass can be beneficial. Ceramic seems to have the advantage, especially when covering cast iron.

Also, the link in the OP seems to be broken.
Glass pie plates yield the best pie crusts.

SO's brownies in a glass baking dish area always done to a "T". Certainly not the only way but a really good one.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 06:08 PM   #38
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
I saw the CU report on glass bakeware breaking in explosive ways today and wondered if anyone has had this happen and whether you use glass bake ware?

It was interesting to learn about the difference between glass used in the US and the glass used in the EU. Here's a link to the story: Consumer Reports: Hot Glassware Can Shatter Unexpectedly
I've used glass bakeware for years, & never had a problem. I use them in the oven & microwave, & put them in the dishwasher. I pulled one out, & the brand name looks like Anchor. According to their site, there's a two year warranty, if used correctly. I have:

2 square
2 large rectangular
1 round casserole (1 1/2 or 2 qt) w/ lid
souffle dish (1 1/2 or 2 qt) w/ lid
Martha Stewart ramekins
Quiche dish/pan
__________________
Cerise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2012, 08:14 AM   #39
Senior Cook
 
Kitchen Barbarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
I don't understand the desire to use glassware for actual cooking anyway, minus things like a double boiler, where the insulative properties of glass can be beneficial. Ceramic seems to have the advantage, especially when covering cast iron.
It's the only truly nonstick, durable bakeware available.

Personally I HATE cast-iron. Glass bakeware isn't lightweight, but cast iron is even heavier. Also, the enameled stuff can crack and craze in high-heat use due to the differing expansion rates of the enamel and the cast iron.

I've been happily baking in Pyrex for 50 years. Nothing's come on the market yet that beats it. I can't tell you how many metal pans I've ended up throwing away because the eventually become uncleanable - as opposed to my big Pyrex baking pans, which clean up in a snap with about 1/10th the effort. I have Pyrex that's as old as I am. You'll get my Pyrex Flameware double-boiler when you pull it from my cold, dead hands! LOL!

I've never bothered to de-glaze a pan for a roast in my life, so I don't miss that.
__________________
Kitchen Barbarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2012, 10:35 AM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,913
People's differing preferences on things like this crack me up

Over the last several years, I've been replacing the Pyrex dishes I collected in my 20s with Le Creuset ceramic and enameled cast iron. I love how the heavy pieces hold on to heat for serving, and they're beautiful as well. I can brown on the stovetop, braise or otherwise finish cooking in the oven, put the pan back on the stovetop and make a yummy sauce or gravy with the fond and drippings and serve.

In the '90s, our neighborhood was overrun with Pampered Chef parties and during that time, I collected several pieces of their stoneware. I love them, too. They're quite durable and non-stick when used correctly.

Never "bothered to de-glaze a pan"? You don't know what you're missing. That's a lot of great flavor going down the drain.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.