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Old 11-02-2014, 01:25 AM   #11
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I agree it's worth saving so let us know what works!

The good thing is, it doesn't have to look beautiful to give you the pleasure of cooking with an old friend. None of us with experience looks as beautiful as we once did.
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Old 11-02-2014, 01:49 AM   #12
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Copper Glo was my absolute favorite thing to clean my Revere Ware bottoms and my copper bowl. Alas, it's been discontinued. I still have part of an old canister, but have been on a hunt for a suitable replacement. Wright's Copper Cream works OK, but like any of these products you also need to bring elbow grease. I recently bought a canister of Siege Copper Powder Cleaner but haven't tried it yet.

I also found this list on Wiki-How of seven different ways to clean copper. I know my Mom's go-to when she ran out of Copper Glo was the lemon-and-salt method.

Good luck! Revere Ware lasts forever. My Mom got hers in the early 1960s and I and both of my kids are still using the many pieces all these decades later.
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Old 11-02-2014, 06:57 AM   #13
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Same here about Revere Ware. I inherited 3 Revere Ware pots that date back to when I was a boy. They last forever.
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Old 11-02-2014, 07:26 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Stick it in a trash bag with an open dish of ammonia. Seal it tightly and leave it outdoors overnight.
+1
That's what works for me as well.

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Old 11-02-2014, 08:04 AM   #15
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I had one similar to that not as bad - I used a paste of lemon juice (real lemons not bottle) and salt - I rubbed it all over then let it set for 10- 15 min and then used a non abrasive scrub pad (like the green flat ones) and it came out good.
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Old 11-02-2014, 08:25 AM   #16
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There's absolutely no question, as somebody else mentioned, that it's Revere Wear. That's what I learned to cook on and my mom had her set as long as I can remember.

Never tried the ammonia trick but have tried several of the others and they do work. Again, as mentioned, time and patience.

Just an FYI, next time wrap the pot in heavy duty foil. Been there, done that with other pans. There isn't any appreciable difference cooking wise and then clean up is just a peel off and throw away.
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Old 11-02-2014, 08:43 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
There's absolutely no question, as somebody else mentioned, that it's Revere Wear. That's what I learned to cook on and my mom had her set as long as I can remember.

Never tried the ammonia trick but have tried several of the others and they do work. Again, as mentioned, time and patience.

Just an FYI, next time wrap the pot in heavy duty foil. Been there, done that with other pans. There isn't any appreciable difference cooking wise and then clean up is just a peel off and throw away.
A trick we used to use in boy scouts was to rub the outside of the pot with Ivory bar soap. You had to take care to completely cover the outside surface. When the cooking was done, the soot and grime simply rinsed off with hot water.

I like the aluminum foil idea. I imagine it's easier than the soap trick.

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Old 11-02-2014, 09:10 AM   #18
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I prefer the ammonia method as most of the work is done while I'm sleeping.
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Old 11-02-2014, 09:47 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
There's absolutely no question, as somebody else mentioned, that it's Revere Wear. That's what I learned to cook on and my mom had her set as long as I can remember.

Never tried the ammonia trick but have tried several of the others and they do work. Again, as mentioned, time and patience.

Just an FYI, next time wrap the pot in heavy duty foil. Been there, done that with other pans. There isn't any appreciable difference cooking wise and then clean up is just a peel off and throw away.
Back in the day, when I was a Cub Scout, we rubbed soap on the pan bottom when we cooked over an open fire.
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Old 11-02-2014, 09:55 AM   #20
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Back in the day, when I was a Cub Scout, we rubbed soap on the pan bottom when we cooked over an open fire.
I remember this from Boy Scout camping trips. However, if you cook over coals rather than burning wood, the soot factor is minimized.
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