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Old 06-01-2015, 02:03 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I cook rice for about seven minutes in my pressure cooker and it comes out perfect. ... After the correct time has elapsed, place the pressure cooker into your sink and run cold water over the top. This will reduce the pressure in seconds until the safety button releases...
This seems like a lot of extra work for a small savings in time, not to mention using extra water unnecessarily. What is the advantage over cooking it in a saucepan? I don't see the problem with waiting 20 minutes for rice to cook.
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Old 06-01-2015, 02:52 PM   #22
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Um, I just looked up Oruro, it's over 12,000 feet above sea level. So, if that's where Josue is, then that explains why it takes so long to cook.

Josue, if Oruro is, indeed, where you are from, you need to look for recipes specifically for high altitudes and/or ask for help from a neighbor or family member since I'm assuming you haven't been cooking for long since you are on this board asking for help for such a simple dish as rice.
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Old 06-01-2015, 03:07 PM   #23
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Wow. Yes, that would do it. Good thinking, medtran.
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Old 06-01-2015, 03:19 PM   #24
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At at altitude your pressure cooker will take about 30% longer to cook....
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Old 06-01-2015, 04:13 PM   #25
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I've never used the pressure cooker to make rice. As has been said, it takes 20 minutes on the stove. Once it's done, you can take it off the heat and keep it covered and it will stay warm until you're ready to eat. Time the rest of your meal to coincide with the rice and you're good to go
At altitude (I'm at 4000 feet above sea level) it takes more like 30 minutes to cook white rice. I mostly use brown rice, and that takes more than an hour, and about half again as much water as white rice.

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At at altitude your pressure cooker will take about 30% longer to cook....
Why? The point of the pressure cooker is to create a higher pressure in the cooker. Just because the ambient pressure is less, does the pressure cooker pressurize less too? I don't understand why that would be. I'm asking because I've never owned one - never felt a need for it.
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Old 06-01-2015, 04:19 PM   #26
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At altitude (I'm at 4000 feet above sea level) it takes more like 30 minutes to cook white rice. I mostly use brown rice, and that takes more than an hour, and about half again as much water as white rice.
That makes sense. It didn't occur to me.
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Old 06-01-2015, 04:31 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
At altitude (I'm at 4000 feet above sea level) it takes more like 30 minutes to cook white rice. I mostly use brown rice, and that takes more than an hour, and about half again as much water as white rice.



Why? The point of the pressure cooker is to create a higher pressure in the cooker. Just because the ambient pressure is less, does the pressure cooker pressurize less too? I don't understand why that would be. I'm asking because I've never owned one - never felt a need for it.
I imagine it takes longer to get it up to pressure.
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Old 06-01-2015, 05:00 PM   #28
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RPCookin said: "The point of the pressure cooker is to create a higher pressure in the cooker. Just because the ambient pressure is less, does the pressure cooker pressurize less too?"
Yes. The pressure relief valve (the part that goes Hssssss...." relieves the pressure differential between the inside and outside of the pressure cooker. If it's set for 10 pounds (just an example), it will release the pressure 10 p.s.i. above the ambient pressure, no matter what the local pressure is.
In short, local altitude does matter.
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Old 06-01-2015, 05:20 PM   #29
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If you can regulate (increase) the pressure in the cooker (adjustable pressure relief valve) you can compensate and cut the cooking time at altitude.
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Old 06-01-2015, 05:58 PM   #30
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The only pressure cooker I've ever seen in action was my mother's. It was an old Presto (had to be pre 1950), and the relief valve was nothing more than a hole in a stem in the center of the lid, and you used a weighted plug sort of thing that just rested on top of the stem. It was the weight of that plug which regulated the pressure, and when the cooking was over, you just took that off and it depressurized through the relief hole in a few seconds.

That one would have cooked to the same internal pressure no matter the ambient atmospheric pressure because it was controlled by gravity.
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