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Old 01-06-2009, 01:07 PM   #31
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And that is why it did not stick.

Seasoning is something that takes time. The pre-seasoned pans jsut take care of the initial seasoning. You need to continue seasoning it (by using it) if you want it to become truly non-stick.
So after a good amount of use, one wouldn't need to use any oil to make it not stick? I have always used oil when cooking in pans......this will take some getting use to.

One more thing, do you think searing is obtained more by way of the CI skillet or a stainless steel pan? Take a beef steak for instance.
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Old 01-06-2009, 02:16 PM   #32
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Technically, yes that is correct. After enough time and cooking with enough fat your pan should be seasoned enough that you would not need to add any oil, but you usually want a little fat in there anyway.

I was watching Americas Test Kitchen the other day and they did a piece on cast iron. To prove that they really are non-stick they made scrambled eggs in a well seasoned cast iron pan with no additional fat. The eggs slid right out without sticking at all.

For searing, both cast iron and SS work great. I would say it is a little easier to get a good sear using CI, but it is pretty easy on SS too.
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Old 01-06-2009, 02:55 PM   #33
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Technically, yes that is correct. After enough time and cooking with enough fat your pan should be seasoned enough that you would not need to add any oil, but you usually want a little fat in there anyway.

I was watching Americas Test Kitchen the other day and they did a piece on cast iron. To prove that they really are non-stick they made scrambled eggs in a well seasoned cast iron pan with no additional fat. The eggs slid right out without sticking at all.

For searing, both cast iron and SS work great. I would say it is a little easier to get a good sear using CI, but it is pretty easy on SS too.
So would you cook your favorite steak in a CI or SS?
You need to pick one !
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Old 01-06-2009, 02:58 PM   #34
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My steak, when not cooked on the grill, always goes in my CI. I preheat the pan as hot as it will go. The pan sucks up and holds onto that heat so well that I get a great sear on the meat. SS can absolutely do the same, but CI just does it better.
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Old 01-06-2009, 03:04 PM   #35
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Cast Iron - hands down!! The only things I cook in my stainless steel cookware are dishes that are going to be "saucy". For searing/grilling like plain steaks, chops, etc., nothing beats my well-seasoned regular cast-iron pan or cast-iron grill pan.
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Old 01-06-2009, 03:10 PM   #36
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Cast Iron - hands down!! The only things I cook in my stainless steel cookware are dishes that are going to be "saucy". For searing/grilling like plain steaks, chops, etc., nothing beats my well-seasoned regular cast-iron pan or cast-iron grill pan.
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Old 01-06-2009, 06:09 PM   #37
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Solid fat (not oil) is the best seasoning for castiron. Our foremothers used castiron and they cooked with animal fat (especially lard).

At a minimum, pick up some Crisco. Better yet, collect fat from meat/poultry you purchase - chicken, pig or beef fat are all fine. Fat freezes well so just collect fat from one type in a ziplock bag (in your freezer). When you have a bunch, throw it, frozen, in your castiron pan and render it. Even if you throw out the rendered fat, this is the best (and easiest) way to season (or re-season) castiron.

If you don't know how to properly render fat, see this post Rendering Fat
I agree. Iuse lard or bacon fat.
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Old 01-07-2009, 09:45 AM   #38
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LARD!

My latest endeavors in CI seasoning (will update on progress soon) are definitely leaning me toward lard. before I had used Crisco... I find the lard gives a much nicer seasoning... more even and more stable.... I am not going back to crisco.

The oils really never worked out all that great either. Lard is the one that gave me a real solid seasoning that did not end up getting damaged easily.

I do give a light rub down of oil after use though.
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Old 01-07-2009, 10:04 AM   #39
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Big Jim and Jet--I was wondering myself about sanding off the bottom of the new cast iron pan I just picked up. It is so rough!! What kind of sandpaper did you use?
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Old 01-07-2009, 10:15 AM   #40
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After cooking with cast iron, its hard to go back to anything else! Most of my pieces have been handed down to me from family members. I did buy my dutch oven and I love it. I will never cook by crock pot again. I think my next piece will be an enamal dutch oven.
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